Nîmes Off The Beaten Path

  • View at the Gardon River.
    View at the Gardon River.
    by Jerelis
  • Close up of the Pont du Gard.
    Close up of the Pont du Gard.
    by Jerelis
  • Great and historical spot to be!
    Great and historical spot to be!
    by Jerelis

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Nîmes

  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    SAINT-GILLES -- BENEDICTINE ABBEY

    by LoriPori Written Dec 24, 2004

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    Benedictine Abbey

    Founded in the 9th century to shelter the tomb of the hermit Giles, the BENEDICTINE ABBEY was to become an important shrine for Christians during the 11th and 12th centuries. The religious wars (1562-1622) dealt the abbey a blow from which it never recovered. In the 17th century the remains of the Romanesque nave were used to build a Church (1650) in a rather undistinguished late Gothic style.
    As Hans, Wim and I were visiting the abbey, there was a lot of commotion around it, as a wedding was about to take place. We watched as the friends and family of the bride and groom arrived. When the bride and groom emerged from the Church, the bells rang and firecrackers went off. Then they proceeded by foot and followed by friends and family, disappeared into the neighbourhood. It was quite an experience.

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    SAINT-GILLES -- TOWN HALL

    by LoriPori Written Dec 24, 2004

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    Hans in front of Town Hall

    On September 23 and 24, Hans, Wim and I stayed at this charming little town of Saint-Gilles. We decided to get a hotel here, because of its central location. It is southeast of Nimes, west of Arles, south of Pont du Gard and Avignon and north of Montpellier and Marseille. It was a nice, quiet town and close to many of the places we wanted to visit. In this photo, Hans is standing in front of the Saint-Gilles Town Hall.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    PONT DU GARD ---THE ROMAN AQUADUCT

    by LoriPori Written Dec 20, 2004

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    Pont du Gard

    Did you know that the GARD ROMAN AQUADUCT is only the most spectacular and best preserved piece of engineering in a magnificent 50km (30 miles) aquaduct that crosses the River Gard, circumvents hills, goes underground and resurfaces again taking water from the source of the Eure River near Uzes to Roman Nimes.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    PONT DU GARD

    by LoriPori Written Dec 24, 2004

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    Pont du Gard

    Standing 49 metres high, the PONT DU GARD was built by the Romans to supply the town of Nimes with water. Providing pure water for Nimes was also creating wealth and ensuring the well-being of the people of Nimes.
    In the acconpanying photo, you get the idea of just how high the aquaduct really is. Those are people walking below (left foreground).

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    PONT DU GARD

    by LoriPori Updated Dec 20, 2004

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    Pont du Gard

    The only remaining three-tier Roman Aquaduct in the world, the PONT DU GARD crosses the River Gard. The Roman architects and engineers who designed and built the aquaduct around 20 BC , created a technical as well as an artistic masterpiece.

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    Uzes

    by roamer61 Written Jun 3, 2007

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    The Duche (Ducal Palace)

    Located near Nimes and not far from the Pont du Gard is the city of Uzes. A seat of once powerful Bishops and Dukes, this well restored city retains a number of historic buildings dating to the Middle Ages. Largest of these is the Ducal Palace, which is a conglomeration of structures built during its long history.

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    Graffiti

    by leics Updated Aug 15, 2008

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    1844 graffito

    One of the 'aisles'of the Temple de Diane in Les Jardins de la Fontaine has been restored with more 'modern' stone, which can clearly be seen.

    I suspect these stones date from the time when the temples ruins were used as a church in Medieval times.

    But the 'off-the-beaten track' thing is the graffiti. Go down the covered 'aisle' to your right as you enter the temple (steps lead there from the 'altar' end). Look carefully at the more modern stones: some (not all) of the graffiti is fascinating.

    The photo shows graffiti dating from 1844, so it is now of historical interest in itself.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Rather nice fountain

    by leics Written Aug 16, 2008

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    Gentle cascades

    This is a modern fountain, but really rather pleasant.

    It may not look much in the photo, but the continual sound of falling water is very soothing.

    Set in a little square of Rue Poissoniere, at the side of the cathedral, it is a series of cascades through which one can walk.

    A nice place to have a rest on a hot day.

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  • Pierre_Rouss's Profile Photo

    Pont du Gard

    by Pierre_Rouss Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Pont du Gard
    This ancient roman viaduc is still standing after 2000+ years. Now the bridge exists about 300m long, 49m above of the river.
    The hike is interesting, and you have to take a dive in the water upstream or downstream of the bridge.

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    Balauziere grotto

    by lonestar_philomath Updated Mar 19, 2007

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    The cave overlooks the Gardon from a rocky outcrop, 800 metres upstream of the Pont du Gard. It is on the left bank on the Saint Privat property. The interior of the cave tells an interesting geologic tale and contains deposits from the Paleolithic era.

    The grotto was listed as an Historic Monument in 1958.

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Pont du Gard – UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    by Jerelis Written Feb 7, 2013

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    Amazing structure.
    4 more images

    Built in the 1st century AD, the Pont du Gard is the highest of all Roman aqueduct bridges and is the best preserved. It was added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1985 because of its historical importance. From the 18th century onwards, particularly after the construction of the new road bridge, it became a famous staging-post for travelers on the Grand Tour and became increasingly renowned as an object of historical importance and I can imagine why.

    We stayed at the site for over two hours. We passed the aqueduct via the Avenue du Pont du Gard and walked our way back via the Gardon River. Being under this amazing structure really gives you an idea how huge it is. We stood there in awe to be honest. After this hike we entered the Pont du Gard aqueduct and this is also quite an experience, beautiful long views all the way around. After this we had a nice dive into the Gardon River close to the aqueduct, so this means swimming with some historical notice. On our way back to the car we passed the restaurant and tourist office, time for a drink and of course some picture postcards. Full filled with a great experience we continued our drive to Narbonne. A great spot to have a stop!

    Address: 400 Route du Pont du Gard, 30210
    Directions: Coming from the highway A9, take the exit to Remoulins. Once you’re on that road just follow the signs of the Pont du Gard.

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  • Catane's Profile Photo

    Around Nîmes, you've got LOT...

    by Catane Updated Sep 10, 2002

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    Catane Taulelle - 1997

    Around Nîmes, you've got LOT of wonderful place to see... Don't plan to come in Nîmes without visiting the surroundings !!! It's so beautiful...

    Here a pic from a place called 'La Mer de rochers' (the rocks' sea), next to a small village named 'Sauve'. After half an hour of walking, you could see blue rocks all around you, mixed with the colours of green nature, it's incredible !

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    The town of Aigues-Mortes

    by Pierre_Rouss Updated Nov 6, 2002

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    Aigues-Mortes
    The little town was founded by Louis IX in 1241. It is enclosed by crenellated and tower-strengthened walls 25 to 30 feet (8 to 9 m) high, which trace a rectangle roughly 1/2 by 1/4 mile (800 by 400 m). The medieval town plan remains intact.
    This fortified city is beautiful.
    Located West of the Camargue.

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  • Blizzle's Profile Photo

    Amazingly Awesome Drive

    by Blizzle Written Mar 14, 2012

    For stunning vistas of southern France take D168 south out of Narbonne towards Narbonne Phage. It is short, only about 10Km, but you would be hard pressed to find a better road. It is windy, so watch out. My favorite memory of our trip thus has been this road and the stunning views of the French country side.

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Pont du Gard – Bridge of the Gard.

    by Jerelis Written Feb 7, 2013
    At the overview of the entire park.
    4 more images

    In the summer of 2011 we visited the southern part of France. We had stayed in Lyon for a night and were on our way to Narbonne, close to the French border with Spain. Driving over the highway A9 we decided it was time for a rest and a lunch. By that time we were close to Nimes and the exit Remoulins. Right in time to leave the highway and get on our way to Pont du Gard …literally: Bridge of the Gard.

    So what is the Pont du Gard exactly? Well, it is an ancient Roman aqueduct bridge that crosses the Gardon River in Vers-Pont-du-Gard near Nimes. For us this beautiful historical site was ideal for a nice walk to stretch the legs and have a lunch, before getting on our way again. Once at the Pont du Gard we were pleasantly amazed by how beautiful it was right there. We learned that it is part of the Nimes aqueduct, a 50 km-long structure built by the Romans to carry water from a spring at Uzès to the Roman colony of Nemausus (Nimes). Because the terrain between the two points is hilly, this aqueduct bridge needed to be built to get the water there. Just walk around, have a jump in the cold river, enjoy the view at the Pont du Gard and relax and unwind!

    Address: 400 Route du Pont du Gard, 30210
    Directions: Coming from the highway A9, take the exit to Remoulins. Once you’re on that road just follow the signs of the Pont du Gard.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Archeology

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Nîmes Off The Beaten Path

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