Fun things to do in Languedoc-Roussillon

  • Loius XIV and the shady trees
    Loius XIV and the shady trees
    by Suet
  • Amphithéâtre (Nimes, France)
    Amphithéâtre (Nimes, France)
    by Redang
  • Cathédrale Saint-Nazaire.
    Cathédrale Saint-Nazaire.
    by JLBG

Most Viewed Things to Do in Languedoc-Roussillon

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    Quillan

    by GentleSpirit Updated Apr 14, 2014

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    The town of Quillan dates from around the 12th century. It is probably not a tourist destination in itself. It is,however, an excellent base to explore the upper Aude Valley and Cathar country. There are good transportation links to Quillan and it is an easy trip to the Cathar Castles, Gorges de Galamus. During the week you can use the bus to get to the Pyrenees Orientales and Villefranche de Conflent and Prades. I stayed here for two nights and was satisfied with the services available to the traveler in this town. Hotels were plentiful and considerably cheaper than Carcassonne. One thing I did not try, which is a major attraction in Quillan and this region, is white water rafting, which is very popular in this part of Languedoc Rousillon. There are a number of outifts that will take you white water rafting, canyoning, via ferrata and other outdoor activities.

    Please visit my Quillan pages here

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    Rennes le Chateau

    by GentleSpirit Updated Apr 14, 2014

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    Rennes le Chateau offers a unique chance to explore a place that is mysterious. Wrapped in local legend you can delve into the controversial questions about this place. At the center of it all is Mary Magdalene, who has long been a local legend. Did she die in the South of France? Was she Jesus' concubine? If you are a fan of Da Vinci code this will have to be one of your stops. Rennes is a mystery wrapped up in a riddle.

    It is a bit remote, the views from Rennes over the surrounding countryside are magnificent. That said, its not easy to reach Rennes, and almost impossible by public transport.

    Please visit my Rennes le Chateau pages here

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    Alet les Bains

    by GentleSpirit Updated Apr 14, 2014

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    Alet les Bains started life as a Roman settlement, mainly due to the presence of hot springs. What you can see today is a small town that has remains from various eras- some Roman, plenty of medieval remains. Interestingly, this small town once had an enormous pilgrimage church whose importance far exceeded its size. This was because at one time it had a relic there, a fragment of the True Cross that was donated by one of the Popes.

    What you see today are ruins of the once great monastery, quite well maintained all things considered. You can still see the walled town and medieval half timber houses.
    A charming place to visit. Give yourself a couple of hours. Easiest to reach from Quillan or Limoux

    note-easily reached by public transport, even on Sunday

    Please see my Alet les Bains page here.

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    The Cathar Castles

    by GentleSpirit Written Nov 7, 2013

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    The Aude department trumpets itself as Pays Cathare, the land of the Cathars. Indeed, a major draw for tourists is the possibility of seeing a few of what are popularly called "Cathar Castles."

    These are isolated fortresses basically on or near what used to be the border between France and Aragon. Today it is the border between the departments of Aude and Pyrenees Orientales.

    The castles known as the Five Sons of Carcassonne: Queribus, Aguilar, Peyrepertuse, Termes and Puilaurens were not built by the Cathars. Historical evidence seems to indicate that yes, Cathars took refuge there, but these were not Cathar castles per se. Some were not even part of France at the time of the Crusade and would therefore not have seen any significant warfare at the time. These were generally rebuilt to serve as frontier posts as they guarded the border with Aragon at the time.

    What these castles have in common is there stunning location. Their original function as defensive castles was excellent. They were generally considered unassailable due to their remote location as well as the difficulty of actually getting to them since they are all located on fairly steep hills.

    As Castles go these are spectacular places. You are left to wonder how the builders made these places in the first place. The views are magnificent. There are some tours available and most of the castles have audioguides available. If you are in this part of France, definitely try to see at least one of the so called Cathar castles.

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    Carcassonne

    by GentleSpirit Written Oct 16, 2013

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    One of the most important reasons to come to Languedoc is to see the fabulous castles here. As castles go, Carcassonne stands out like few others can. It is visually stunning, taking up the entire hillside You have to wonder how it could even have been attacked, it seems to amazingly well protected and mighty. You have that wonder as you walk through the castle and see for yourself the huge ramparts.

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    Port-Vendres

    by grayfo Updated Jul 13, 2012

    Port-Vendres is the only natural port along the rocky Mediterranean coast (called the Vermilion Coast, because of the bright red colours of the rocks) and is situated near the Spanish border in south west France. Port-Vendres is both a deep-water commercial port and fishing and yachting harbour working all year round.

    July 1982

    See My Travel Page for more information.

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    Collioure

    by grayfo Updated Jul 12, 2012

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    Things To Do: Collioure

    Located only 20 minutes from the Pyrenees and Spanish Catalonia, Collioure is an attractive port that was home of the Fauvist Movement, favoured because of the rare quality of the light. The town said to resemble St-Tropez before it was spoiled, a French answer to England’s St Ives. Collioure is a charming and alluring port, said to be at its best in spring and autumn. When visiting don’t miss the Chateau Royal, few forts are more impressive, with sheer walls rising out of the water. In the 13th and 14th centuries it was part of the Kingdom of Majorca; it was fortified in the 15th century and fought over by the kings of Aragon, Spain and France in the 16th and 17th centuries.

    July 1982

    See My Travel Page for more information.

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    Canet-Plage

    by grayfo Updated Jul 8, 2012

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    This seaside resort is a favourite with the locals from Perpignan with its 9 kilometres of sandy beaches and its immense sea front boulevard. The busy yachting harbour has moorings for over 1,000 boats.

    July 1982

    See My Travel Page for more information.

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    Argelès-sur-Mer

    by grayfo Updated Jul 6, 2012

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    Argelès-sur-Mer is an old Catalan village located on the Mediterranean coast 20 km south of Perpignan, near Spain and at the foot of the Pyrenees, in one of the sunniest regions of France. Its small, narrow streets and picturesque houses give it an outstanding French charm. The area boasts a sandy beach 7km in length, that’s been awarded the European Blue Flag for cleanliness repeatedly. The beaches offer plenty of activity for the nautical enthusiasts, renowned wind surfing area, diving and snorkelling.

    July 1982

    See My Travel Page for more information.

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    List of Roman bridges

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    The Romans were the world's first major bridge builders. The following list constitutes an attempt to list all known Roman bridges, many of which still survive to this day.

    Most data not otherwise marked comes from O’Connor's Roman Bridges which lists 330 stone bridges for traffic, 34 timber bridges and 54 aqueduct bridges.
    Pont du Gard is one of the most impressive.

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    Gard-river

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    The Gardon or Gard (Occitan and French: Gardon, Gard) is a river in southern France. It is the namesake of the Gard département. Several of its tributaries are also called Gardon.

    The Gardon is 133 km long including its longest tributary "Gardon de Saint-Jean".
    The Roman aqueduct Pont du Gard and the 16th-century Pont Saint-Nicolas are two historic bridges that cross the Gardon. The Gorge du Gardon, which ends at Pont Saint-Nicolas, is a popular recreation area for kayaking, canoeing, rock climbing, and hiking.

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    Pont du Gard

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    The Pont du Gard is 275 metres long at its highest level, with a height of 44,77 metres. The first two bays are constructed with arches superimposed and juxtaposed in the same architectural scheme.
    The archways do not all have the same opening, that which spans the bed of the river is larger to allow freer passage of the river water. The central row of pillars rest on those of the base line, all this weight giving these latter elements better resistance to lateral pressure from the arches. As for the top level, this represents a very much lesser load.

    You can watch my 1 min 49 sec Video Pont du Gard out of my Youtube channel.

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    Pont du Gard Museum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 10, 2012

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    On the site of the Pont du Gard, you will find a museum tracing the history of the Roman aqueduct. Models, virtual reconstructions, multimedia screens and sounds draw you into the Ancient Roman world.
    Every day from 7 am to 1 am
    Cultural spaces and welcome desk are open from 9 am to 5.30 pm (Winter opening hours available until the 29th of february)
    Single rate : 18 € per vehicle (up to 5 persons per car).
    This fee gives you access to the whole site and the cultural spaces (Museum, Ludo, Mémoires de Garrigues, Cinema, Exhibition, Resource center)

    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel

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    Vernet-les-Bains

    by tompt Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Vernet-les-Bains is a mountain village ( altitude of 650 m (± 2,000 ft)) in the eastern Pyrenees of France. The village is set in a sheltered valley in the foothills of the Canigou mountain (2,785 m (over 9,000 ft).
    Vernet-les-Bains is known for its hot springs. A health centre is specially equipped for the treatment of respiratory and rheumatic conditions.
    The city like to call itself Centre for green tourism. Over 1,500 trees are located within the village from 200 species. There are many walks in the Canigou massif, and in the Cady valley.
    There is also a geological museum.

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    Stone organ pipes

    by tompt Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The beautifull sandstone formations : Site G?ologique des Orgues, are defenitely worth visiting.
    An easy road to walk to the site from the carpark takes you in 20 minutes to the site.
    A leaflet explains all the things you see on your way there. From the riverbed you are walking through to the birds in the area.
    The organpipes are sanstone formations formed by rain and wind during centuries.

    More pictures in our travelogue at our France page.

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Languedoc-Roussillon Hotels

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Languedoc-Roussillon Things to Do

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