Angers Things to Do

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  • Things to Do
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Best Rated Things to Do in Angers

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    Cointreau Distillery

    by TimDaoust Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Inside the Cointreau distillery

    Yum, Cointreau, a liquor created in 1849 by two brothers, Adolphe and Edouard-Jean Cointreau, distilled from bitter and sweet orange peels and oh so tasty.
    This place rocked. What can I say? A tour of the factory and their gallery of old Cointreau ads and framed newspaper clippings and then at the end free cocktails (included with the price of the tour) and a nice gift shop. It was well worth the visit. They never did let us on the third floor though because they said they were afraid of international spies getting their secret recipe. The distillery is on the outskirts of la ville d'Angers so it may require a bus ride but definitely take the time.

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    Le Chateau D'Angers

    by TimDaoust Updated Jan 28, 2005

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    Les Jardins du Chateau d'Angers

    This medieval era chateau sits atop a much older (Gallo-Roman) structure of something like 17 enormous towers with a dry moat surrounding them. Tours are cheap and will take you into the medieval era castle where the Tapisserie de l'Apocolypse, a tapestry that depicts the book of Revelations from the Bible, is housed. There are also many other tapestries of the same era contained within. After the tour you should roam around the top of the towers and the chateau gardens. Also, in passing the chateau, one can see the magnificent gardens down in the dry moat surrounding the towers, one of the most beaufiul in the city. Also see the Promenade de Port Ligny and the rose garden at the foot of the walls on the side of the chateau facing the river . For a little more history on the Chateau go here

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    Le Cathedrale Saint Maurice

    by TimDaoust Updated Apr 30, 2005

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    Cathedrale St. Maurice

    This is another huge landmark within the city and very hard to miss. The Cathedrale exterior as well as interior are not to be missed. It sits atop a wide staircase often referred to by the same name as the Cathedral. It towers over all else around and contains some beautiful stained glass windows. There is still a bishop seated here and they hold regular services as well. The structure itself was built over the course of many centuries, from the Gallo-Roman period on until the 15th century. Go here for a great panorama of the cathedral and the staircase.

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    Musee Pince

    by TimDaoust Written Jan 28, 2005

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    Musee Pince courtyard

    This museum I did see and on the same day as the Fete de la Musique so I regret to say we rushed through it in anticipation of the coming evenings events. But I did see it all.
    There was a huge collection of Asian and African art all within the small rooms of the historic Hotel Pince on rue Lenepveu, giving the museum a very intimate feel to it. I'll have a picture from inside the museum up here soon.

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    Musee Jean Lurcat

    by TimDaoust Written Oct 7, 2004

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    Outside Musee Jean Lurcat

    This is a nice spot for those who enjoy art galleries and museums but don't want to wait in long lines or spend an entire day in some place as big as the Louvre. It is a collection of Tapestries done by Jean Lurcat (1892-1966) called "Le Chant du Monde. They are all based on the artist's rendition of the world before during and after the apocolypse.

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    Château du Roi René - overview

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ch��teau du Roi Ren��
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    The château du Roi René is a 13-century fortress with beautiful gardens. It was erected under Blanca of Castilla, Louis IX's regent, in 1228-38. It has a shape of irregular pentagone with 17 towers. Inside, you can see the famous Apocalypse tapestry.
    It took its name from Duke René d'Anjou, aka René of Naples (1409-1480).
    For information about prices and opening times, see the site below.

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    Maison du Vin

    by TimDaoust Written Jan 28, 2005

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    Maison du Vin

    This is a nice place to go and taste wines from the Loire Valley. They are relatively inexpensive to buy there and you can taste as well for free before you buy. The lady who works there is really nice too, if the same one is still there. It is conveniently located across the street from the Chateau d'Angers and beside the Office du Tourisme. Go, see, taste!

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    Maine River

    by TimDaoust Updated Jun 13, 2006

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    Me by the Maine

    The Maine River bisects the city of Angers and connects to the Loire river a few miles south of Angers. There are numerous quays that border the river and three main bridges that cross it; Pont de la haute Chaine, Pont de Verdun and Pont de la basse Chaine. This is the Quay Eric Tabarly on which I sit in this picture playing a guitar a bought in Angers for 75 euros at a local shop.

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    Jardin du Mail - the wild part

    by Mikebond Updated Sep 1, 2007

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    high trees
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    This is the wild part of the jardin du Mail. It isn't so wild as a forest, but the high trees show that man hasn't interfered much with nature here. Also the flowerbeds are wilder and not so artistic as in the previous tip. Pity that the building on the second pics spoils this bucolic atmosphere!

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    Galerie David d'Angers

    by TimDaoust Written Jan 28, 2005

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    This collection of sculptor David d'Angers' works is housed in the restored Toussaint Abbey on rue Toussaint. I never got a chance to go and see them but it's 3 EUR for adults and free for children, between Oct. 3 through June 5, it's open every day except Mondays 10am-12pm, and 2pm to 6pm. From June 6 to Oct. 2 it's opened 10am to 7pm every day of the week but it stays open until 9pm on Fridays. Go check it out.

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    Chateau d'Angers

    by shrimp56 Updated Apr 2, 2005

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    Chateau d'Angers

    The chateau occupies the highest promontory in the city over looking the Maine-et-Loire River. Fortunately for sightseeing it is close to the cathedral!
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    The Tapestry of the Apocalypse displayed inside the chateau is the main reason many people visit the chateau. It is 100 meters long tapestry series, finished in1378. It recounts tells the story of St. John's Vision of the Apocalypse. There is also the lovely Ste Genevieve Chapel.
    .
    It has a perimeter of almost a kilometre and seventeen towers! The entrance is on the uphill, town side.

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    Château - Tapisserie de l'Apocalypse

    by Mikebond Updated Dec 8, 2005

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    tapisserie de l'Apocalypse
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    The tapisserie de l'Apocalypse ("Apocalypse tapestry") is a series of 75 scenes (there were 98 originally) from Saint John the Apostle's Apocalypse, the last book of the Bible. It was made by Parisian artist Nicolas Bataille between 1373 and 1380 on paintings by Hennequin de Bruges. It is 13 metres long and 4.50 metres high; it was restored in 1843.
    I took some photos but unfortunately the quality is not the best because it was forbidden to use flash and I was using a normal camera.

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    St. Maurice Cathedral

    by shrimp56 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St Maurice

    There has been a bishop seated here since the 4th century, but the building dates from the 12th century with plenty of revisions since.
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    We arrived at the beginning of a Sunday mass so were only able to see the building from the very back of the church's nave

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    Jardin du Mail

    by TimDaoust Written Jan 28, 2005

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    Go see these gardens in Angers. Created around the 17th century, the paths in the garden converge on a fountain done by Barbezat. The park is open year round. I'm sorry to say that I don't have any pictures because I never got a chance to go but I shall on the return journey this December.

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    Musée Jean Lurçat

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    Mus��e Jean Lur��at

    The musée Jean Lurçat et de la tapisserie contemporaine is located in the ancien hôpital Saint-Jean, one of the oldest in France: it was built between 1174 and 1186. The salle des malades ("room of patients"), built in 1181 and used until 1854, hosts works by Jean Lurçat (1892-1966), in particular ten tapestries forming the Chant du Monde ("Song of the World").
    I enjoyed this museum very much, but unfortunately it was forbidden to photograph. This pic has been taken from the site of the city hall.

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