Chantilly Off The Beaten Path

  • hospice Grand Condé
    hospice Grand Condé
    by gwened
  • Chantilly
    Chantilly
    by Toyin
  • Chantilly Wallabies
    Chantilly Wallabies
    by freya_heaven

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Chantilly

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    Church Notre Dame de Chantilly

    by gwened Written Jul 9, 2013
    church Notre Dame de Chantilly
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    a wonderful church by the back of the racecourse and near the castle. Built by Henri-Jules, son of the Grand Condé from 1687 to 1691, on a plan of the architect Mansard then enlarged by Louis Henri, Duke of Bourbon in 1724, it was consecrated under the patronage of our Lady of the assumption.Inside, paintings by Louis de Boulogne said the younger (1654-1733), Léon Bénouville (1821-1859) and Jules Lenepveu (1821-1859), the monument of the hearts of Condé and the organ filed since 1980.

    Tragic events of a revolution ,any revolution, can be read from this church. Some of that history here
    The rising revolution suppressed the Jesuit professed house,at rue St-Antoine in Paris. The hearts of the princes of Condé, that it housed, were transferred, February 4, 1791, in the Church of Chantilly on the order of the prince de Condé, who had already emigrated. Two months later, the Abbot Robert and his two vicars were removed, after refusing to swear an oath to the civil constitution of the clergy. October 15, 1793, it was "the abomination of desolation": the objects of worship stolen, burned the hearts of the princes thrown in the old cemetery behind the Church, desecrated graves.Two of the bells were sent to the melting and the Church closed became a storage of saltpeter used for the manufacture of gunpowder.

    A silence of eight years would fall on the Notre-Dame parish; only one survived the Church of the catacombs, supported by Abbots Aillot, former prebendary of St - Nicolas of Cya and Dufresnoy, former Vicar of St-Rieul de Senlis. The renaissance after the storm, in 1801 the Abbot Robert returned to Chantilly, and on 16 May 1802, a solemn Te Deum was sung in the Church. In 1814, after the return of the Princes, the only Bell left to the Church, cracked, was replaced by a small, second-hand, which bears the inscription: "A the mother of God, the Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel, to the celestial Mother Teresa of Jesus" and a medallion with the child Jesus and Saint John. After the looting of the Church in 1793, the innkeeper Petit had gathered the hearts of the Princes and he handed them to the Prince de Condé in 1814. It was put in a Cabinet of the sacristy where was to join them, on 3 September 1830, the heart of the Duke of Bourbon, last name of the line.
    The chapel of the castle had been destroyed, as the rest of the building, at the end of the Revolution, but the stone of the altar, saved by Ms. Séguin, was given to the Church of our Lady (Notre Dame). And so the church reborn for all of us to cherish it and enjoy it.
    You should stop by when in town
    a pdf file in French from the tourist office
    http://www.chantilly-tourisme.com/brochure/eglise.pdf

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Hospital of the Grand Condé

    by gwened Written Jul 9, 2013
    hospice Grand Cond��
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    one of the landmarks of the city often overlook but very nice noble and historic. The hospital or hospice de Grand Condé

    a bit of history that explains better this beautiful peaceful place in Chantilly

    The Foundation Conde at Place Omer Vallon, established in Vineuil Saint Firmin by Charlotte de Montmorency, under the direction of Saint Vincent de Paul and Louise de Marillac, was transferred to Chantilly in 1711 when it became "Hospice Condé" and "Hospital de Chantilly". Successively enlarged and transformed buildings operate today as social housing.

    The Chapel of the Hospice at Place Omer Vallon was built in 1836-1837, on the orders of Queen Marie-Amélie (administrator for his son, the Duke of Aumale) the Chapel is dedicated under the patronage of St. Vincent de Paul.

    The Chapel Saint Laurent at square Versepuy was built in 1534 on the lawn, not far from the grill of honor, near the trough of the castle part of seven chapels built by Anne de Montmorency. During the construction of the great stables, it was removed and rebuilt in the garden of the hospital. Saint Laurent Street was the old city cemetery of the town and it took the name. Inside, a nice collection of vases of pharmacy.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

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    Watch the traffic

    by Toyin Written Nov 27, 2004

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    Chantilly

    I observed that the roads are very narrow and one has to be very careful, even when you are taking a walk. The vechicles seems to move very fast and there are very few space for people that are walking.
    This may be because we arrived here when majority of tourists were hurrying out and back to Paris.

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    Wallabies

    by freya_heaven Written Nov 7, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chantilly Wallabies

    At the far end of the park in a north east (ish) direction from the Chateau is a relatively new attraction, a wallabie enclosure in a corner of a large field. There must have been about 15 wallabies here. I actually felt considering the size of the field they could have made their enclosure much bigger. Its about a 20 minute stroll from the Chateau.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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