Arles Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by kenningst
  • Things to Do
    by Herkbert
  • The coliseum in Arles
    The coliseum in Arles
    by Herkbert

Most Recent Things to Do in Arles

  • Redang's Profile Photo

    Eglise Saint-Trophime

    by Redang Updated May 6, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Eglise Saint-Trophime (Arles, France)
    4 more images

    The Eglise (Church) Saint-Trophime is also known as Primatiale or the Cathedral of St Trophime.

    Built over several stages, the main part of the building dates back to the 12th century, and today it is a Parish Church.

    It was Built over several stages and the main part of the building which we see today dates back to the 12th century, when its façade, orginally sober, was highlighted by a splendid historic statuary. It is one of most important Provençal Romanesque buildings. In addition, it is one of the churches containing relics on the Way of St James. A Gothic choir replaced the Romanesque apses in the 15th century.

    The monument was built over several stages. It has the

    Was this review helpful?

  • International Photographie Festival

    by Vanguest Updated Apr 28, 2010

    During every Sommer, from July to September, the city beseides the International Photographie Festival which is one of the major photo events in the world. Each year more then 70,000 visitors come from all around the world to Rencontres d’Arles to visit the 60 exhibitions presented throughout the city. It is a gathering place for many art and photographie professionnals who come during the Opening Fortnight in July every years.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toshioohsako's Profile Photo

    Visit Van Gogh Cafe

    by Toshioohsako Written Oct 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Its a famous cafe in Van Gogh's painting "The Night Cafe Terrace". It was closed when I visited. There are also interesting restaurants around. It has been said that some friends told Gogh to go to Arles because there are many beautiful women here. Its a question mark until you come here!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Beausoleil's Profile Photo

    Go ahead . . . be a tourist.

    by Beausoleil Updated Sep 1, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Little Tourist Train by the Roman Coliseum

    This is a golden oldie photo but we did finally take the little tourist train in Arles. I absolutely love the little tourist trains and drag my husband on little trains all over the place. It honestly is a good way to get the lay of the land when you are visiting a place for the first time and most of the folks on there with you will be adults, mostly European tourists, who are also addicted to the little trains.

    You chug around town listening to a commentary and make mental notes of where you want to walk back and spend some time. The price here is in francs, long outdated. The last little tourist train we took was in Nice and was around 5 euros which seems an excellent price for a fun ride around town.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • kenningst's Profile Photo

    Out of Arles: Horse Riding

    by kenningst Written Jul 30, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As we were travelling from the National Park back to our hostel, we pass by a lot of "farms" offering horse ride into the national park and we thought is was a good idea and went for it. We chose Promenade A Cheval Poney because we saw that their horses are much more well maintained. Good choice and had loads of fun for a 1.5 hours ride into the woods, across the river and back to the farm. Loved it...

    Was this review helpful?

  • kenningst's Profile Photo

    Out of Arles: Parc Ornithologique

    by kenningst Written Jul 30, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    We went to Parc Ornithologique from Arles. One of the best most well preserved national park I've ever been to. Even the toilets are promoting natural recycling which simply amazes me. The best part is that majority of the wild animals are not kept hostage in cages but they simply have created an environment that is so friendly that the animals chose to stay in this area. Main highlight of the place is the Flamingos which runs in packs. AWESOME!!! A must visit place...

    p/s: bring mosquitoe repelent. loads of them here waiting to feast on you..

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Notre-Dame-de-la-Major

    by Tom_Fields Updated Jan 4, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Notre-Dame-de-la-Major
    2 more images

    This is the church of the herders in the Camargue region. Here, each May first, they celebrate the feast of their patron saint, Saint George, and the priest blesses their horses.

    Built on the site of an ancient Roman temple, this Romanesque church was begun in the 12th century. Damaged in World War II, it's been extensively restored.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Baths of Constantine

    by Tom_Fields Written Jan 4, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman baths
    2 more images

    These baths offer a look at how the Romans bathed, which they generally did daily whenever possible. The baths were a center of social life, where people gather and talk about the day. There were three main parts: the tepidarium, the caldarium, and the frigidarium. The first was lukewarm, the second hot, and the third cold. Bathers would enter them in that order. Then they would dry off. Slaves kept the fires burning to heat up the water. One can still see where they would toil, constantly moving new coals into the cavities beneath the water and sweeping out the ashes.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • davequ's Profile Photo

    Beautifully preserved Roman Theatre in Orange

    by davequ Updated Nov 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    from Culture Spaces / Theater Antique
    1 more image

    This is the beautiful 2000 year old Roman Theatre in the Provence city of Orange. Its theatre wall is still wonderfully preserved. Plays and concerts still take place here.

    In my opinion, one the best 'ruins' sites in Provence

    Here is admission rate and other info.

    Orange is about an hour drive north from Arles.

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • micrologus's Profile Photo

    Montmajour Abbey

    by micrologus Written Sep 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The monastry
    4 more images

    L'Abbaye de Montmajour, située à 5 km du centre ville d'Arles est bâtie sur un îlot rocheux et constitue un remarquable répertoire des formes architecturales romane, gothique et classique.
    Elle s'illustre par la construction de deux ensembles monastiques du 11ième au 18ième siècles, lieux de vie d'une communauté de moines bénédictins.

    Built on the island of Mont Majour in the Middle Ages, the abbey comprises an 11th century pre-Romanesque structure, the Saint Peter hermitage, a crypt that is unique in Provence, an abbey church and a 12th century Romanesque cloister, Montmajour was enlarged in the 18th century when a second monumental monastry was built to the west to honour Saint Maur.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • micrologus's Profile Photo

    Arles and Vincent Van Gogh

    by micrologus Updated Sep 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Van Gogh arrived in Arles in February 1888. Then starts an period of intens and passionate work in the lights of the 'Midi'. This was the most producting period in the live of the artist. He produced a lot of paintings and drawings while staying in Arles, more than 300 works in only 15 moths. In May 1989 he left Arles and went to Saint-Rémy-en-Provence where he was hospitalised, but the name of Vincent van Gogh will always been linked to the name of Arles.
    There is a tour leading you to places Van Gogh made imortal in his works: Le Café "Le Soir" (Place du Forum); L'escalier du Pont de Trinquetaille (Pont de Trinquetaille); La nuit étoilée (Quai du Rhône); La Maison Jaune (Place Lamartine, la maison fut bombardée en 1944); Les Arènes (the Amphitheatre); Le Vieux Moulin (Rue Mireille); Les Alyscamps (les Alyscamps); Le Jardin Publique (Boulevard des Lices); Le jardin de la Maison de Santé (Espace Van Gogh) and Le Pont de Langlois aux Lavandières (route du pont de Langlois, the bridge has been moved to the south of Arles)

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • micrologus's Profile Photo

    Arles in the Renaissance and the Classical Period

    by micrologus Written Sep 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porte de la Cavalerie
    2 more images

    The tour leads you to the 'Hôtel de Ville, Place de la République, Eglise Sainte Anne, Archévêché, Chapelle de la Charité, Espace Van Gogh, Hôtel de la Lauzière, Chapelle des Trinitaires, Museon Arlaten, Hôtel Damian de Vinsargues, Hôtel de Divonne, Place Paul Doumer, Hôtel de l'oeuvre du Bouillon, Eglise Saint Martin du Méjan, Musée Réattu, Grande Boucherie, Hôtel de Grille, Eglise Saint Julien, Porte de la Cavalerie, Fontaine Amédée Pichot, Couvent des Ursulines, Hôtel Barrème de Manville, Hôtel de Luppé, Hôtel Courtois de Langlade, Hôtel de Donine, Hôtel Quiqueran de Beaujeu, Maison des Amazones, Hôtel de Castillon, Hôtel Doutreleau, Place du Forum, Hôtel Léautaud de Donine, Hôtel Perrin de Jonquières, Hôtel Icard Duquesne, Chapelle des Jésuites and Le plan de la cour,

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • micrologus's Profile Photo

    The Mediveal City

    by micrologus Updated Sep 24, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saint Trophime church
    4 more images

    The tour leads you from the Church Saint Trophime to the Cloister Saint Trophime, the old entrance to the cloister, the 'Tour de Roland', the 'Porterie du Grand Couvent', St Jean de Moustier and St Blaise Chapels, 'Les Alyscamps', the 'Tour des Mourgues', Notre Dame de la Major church, the towers at the arena, the 'Cour de la commanderie de Sainte Luce', 'Eglise des Prêcheurs' and the 'Palais des Podestas'

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • micrologus's Profile Photo

    The Roman city

    by micrologus Written Sep 24, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Arena
    4 more images

    First go to the Tourist office, there you can buy a booklet with 5 pedestrian tours you can do. The first of these tours is the ancient Arles. It starts at the 'Musée d'Arles et de la Provence antiques' and leads to the Roman Circus, the rests of an temple of the Forum, the 'Cryptoportiques', the obilisk, 'Les Alyscamps' or the necropolis, the gate of August, the ancient theatre, the arena and the thermal baths of Constantin.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LauraWest's Profile Photo

    Unique Roman Theatre

    by LauraWest Updated Sep 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman Theatre of Arles was built at the end of 1st century B.C., on top of the hill of Hauture, not against the hillside as man other Roman theatres. The stage was a wooden platform with curtain machinery underneath. Behind the stage stood a wall of a hundred pillars, decorated on 3 levels. Many statues stood there. The Venus of Arles, now in the Louvre in Paris, was from this theatre. The photo shows the remaining pillars and some of the bases remaining.

    Today, much of the semi-circle stone seating rises up from the ground. A platform stage is used for performances. I took this photo of the stage. The chorus once sang in front of the stage, back in ancient times. Today the theatre is called The Theatre Antique.

    For a small ticket you may walk around here and take photos, of course. Stand on the stage and sing,imagining you were once a Roman, in a past life! Or find the latest schedule of events and go to one as an audience member. I would prefer to do the later!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Arles

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

82 travelers online now

Comments

Arles Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Arles things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Arles sightseeing.

View all Arles hotels