Arles Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Arles

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    St Trophime Cloisters

    by davequ Updated Jan 5, 2007

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    So much has been written about and so many pages have been done on this beautiful piece of medieval architecture, so I won't bore you.... just go see it.

    Front door (West entrance) to St. Trophime with all its beautiful detailed sculpture, frieze, etc. is on Place Republique in town center.

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    Rome ruins

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 23, 2007

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    People often give Arles the name of "a small Rome on banks of Rhone". It always laid on crossing of roads between Italy and Spain. In 49 year B.C. July Caesar during the war with Marseilles addressed for the help to owners of local ship-building shipyard as required the military ships.

    After a victory he allocated the legionaries with huge territory on which those should base a colony, submitted authorities of Rome. The magnificent city with a forum, a temple, an amphitheater, circus and terms has been constructed soon.

    Arles - Rome ruins
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    L'Espace Van Gogh ~ as Van Gogh Painted It

    by Lady_Mystique Updated Apr 12, 2005

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    Van Gogh spent several visits at the Hotel Dieu (hospital), after his automutilation.
    Upon this subject, several interpretations have been issued. The newspaper "Le Forum Républicain", issued on the 30th of December 1888, printed these lines:
    "Last Sunday on 11:30 pm, the named Vincent Vaugogh (sic), painter from Holland, appeared to the brothel n°1, asked for Rachel and gave her his cut ear, saying "keep this object carefully", then he vanished.
    Informed of this event , the police came the day after to his address where they found him laying in his bed, giving almost no sign of life. This poor devil was admitted in urgence to the hospital."

    "The Courtyard of the Hospital at Arles"
    Arles, April 1889
    Oil on canvas, 73 x 92 cm
    Winterthur, Collection of Oskar Reinhart

    The Courtyard of the Hospital at  Arles ~ Van Gogh
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    St. Trophime

    by rwlittle Written May 9, 2004

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    The ornate entrance (shown in the photo) to this church conceals a mix of Romanesque and Gothic interior features. The church was built in the 12th century.

    We went in and walked through the church and the cloisters...check out the other photos in the travelogue.

    St. Trophime, Arles
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    The Roman city

    by micrologus Written Sep 24, 2007

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    First go to the Tourist office, there you can buy a booklet with 5 pedestrian tours you can do. The first of these tours is the ancient Arles. It starts at the 'Musée d'Arles et de la Provence antiques' and leads to the Roman Circus, the rests of an temple of the Forum, the 'Cryptoportiques', the obilisk, 'Les Alyscamps' or the necropolis, the gate of August, the ancient theatre, the arena and the thermal baths of Constantin.

    The Arena The museum and the excavations at the Roman Circus Remains of a temple of the Forum Les Cryptoportiques The Ancient Theatre
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    Bring on El Toro

    by rexvaughan Written Aug 5, 2004

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    This is the floor of the Roman Arena. As you can see, it is prepared for the bullfights which I think is about its only use these days. Apparently many of the original seats are still in use. It amazes me to find anything 2000 years old still functioning as it did originally. Why don't we build stadia like this anymore?

    Arena floor
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    Saint Trofim Church

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 23, 2007

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    Saint Trofim is the most ancient church of Arles. It was constructed in VII century. It was named in honour of the first bishop of Arles. The legend says, that he was sent here by apostles for the sermon of the Christian doctrine.

    The church is the sample of the Provence-Roman architectural style. The portal decorated by sculptural images of apostles is especially beautiful. There is a monastery near the church. Romance and Gothic gallery form together harmonious ensemble.

    Arles - Saint Trofim Church
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    Le Theatre Antique

    by rwlittle Written May 9, 2004

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    Near to the amphitheatre are the ruined remains of a Roman theatre. Over the years, the stones were quarried away to be used in other buildings, leaving mostly jumbled remains.

    The photo shows one view of Le Theatre Antique, with myself standing in front of the "two widows" (the two standing columns remaining).

    Le Theatre Antique
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    Roman Arena

    by rexvaughan Written Aug 5, 2004

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    In the bowels of this arena you can see the basics of stadium construction even today. This one once held more than 20,000 people watching the gladiators get slaughtered by wild animals. Today it is used for a much more civilized passtime - bullfighting! In the middle ages it was used as a fortress and at one time contained the whole city to protect themselves from marauders.

    Amphitheatre
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Arena (cont)

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 23, 2007

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    The size of its ellipse is equal from 107 till 136 meters. 43 of some spectator places rise above the arena. It is allowed to be placed about 30 thousand spectators here. Lines crown 60 arches.

    The arena is on 2,5 meters below the first spectator. It protected spectators from possible attacks of animals participated in gladiatorial battles.

    Arles - Arena Arles - Arena - Me
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    St. Trophime Church

    by rexvaughan Written Aug 5, 2004

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    What an entrance into this 12th Century church! As usual the stone reliefs tell the story in pictures. Above is Christ surrounded by the symbols of the gospel writers and below them are the 12 Apostles. This doorway alone is worth a stop but go inside and into the Cloister. It is also magnificent. The church is named after a 3rd century local bishop and sits on the Place de la Republique which is a great plaza as well.

    Grand Entry!
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    Muséon Arlaten

    by Lady_Mystique Written Apr 12, 2005

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    Frédéric Mistral began his collection of ethnographic items from Provence in 1896.
    In 1904 when he won the Nobel Prize, he used the money to purchase the 16th-century Hôtel de Castellane-Laval to house his Muséon Arlaten.
    Mistral's aim was to record the details of everyday life in Provence for future generations.

    The evolution of the traditional Arlésienne costume is thoroughly documented. Nowadays, the female museum attendents here are the last Arlésiennes to wear the traditional costume, as they sit crocheting by the windows and gossiping (not in Provençal, but French).

    One room is dedicated to the Félibrige, and another to Mistral himself, with the great man's cradle under glass.

    Open:

    April - May and September:
    9:30am - 12:30pm and 2 - 6 pm
    June - August:
    9:30 am - 1pm and 2 - 6:30 pm
    October to March:
    9:30 am - 12:30pm and 2 - 5pm
    October to June:
    Closed on Monday

    Poster
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    Republic Square

    by davequ Updated Aug 28, 2004

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    Place de la Republique in old city center of Arles is, along with the forum, the hub/center of the old city.

    It contains the 34-foot Egyptian obelisk in the middle of the fountain.

    The picture I took from the steps of Saint Trophime church on Saturday 9/26/03 is not good quality, but it means very much to me.

    If you look closely to the right of the tree in the foreground you will see the outline of a man playing the flute.

    His name is Gonzalo Vera, and he is very talented. I was a professional musician for 15 years and I can attest not only to his talent, but even more, to the feeling with which he played. He is accompanied on tape by sythesizer recordings, simple and tastefully done, played on the speakers at his feet.

    The overall effect and beautiful sound of an excellent flutist backed by classical synthesizer, echoing through the ancient Place de la Republique actually brought tears (the good kind) to many who stopped to listen, myself included.

    I spoke with Gonzalo during a short pause, and bought one of his cds. I still listen to it now and then, as it is very well produced and sounds excellent, to bring back the memory of that moment.

    Thank you Gonzalo, for sharing your talent in such a beautiful place.

    Gonzalo casting his spell
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    Better pictures of Gonzalo Vera

    by davequ Updated Aug 28, 2004

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    These are much much better pictures of the excellent flutist, Gonzalo Vera, who was playing in Arles Republic Square this last September 2003.

    On the the left, a close shot I took of him playing. The one on the right is from his cd "Sounds" that I bought from him and listen to when the mood is right.

    I think his home is Barcelona, but I am not sure. His email address "gonzalovera90@hotmail.com" appears to be inactive, so I cannot send him a thankyou.

    If you ever see/hear him, please tell him David says "hola."

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    Musée Réattu

    by Lady_Mystique Updated Apr 26, 2005

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    The building which houses this museum and stands on the banks of the Rhône, was once the Priory of the Knights of Malta.
    Built in the 14th century, this was the headquarters of the knights who came from all over Europe. The knights, who were divided into eight langues (tongues) used this as their local headquarters for the 'Langues de Provence'.

    After the Revolution, an academic (and somewhat mediocre) painter named Jacques Réattu purchased the priory and his daughter made it into the Musée Réattu.

    Besides Réattu's own contributions, there are works by Théodore Rousseau, 57 drawings from Picasso (in gratitude for the many bullfights he enjoyed in Arles).
    There are also more recent works by César and Pol Bury.

    Upstairs is an exhibition gallery devoted to photography.

    Mus��e R��attu
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Arles Things to Do

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