Fun things to do in Avignon

  • Avignon Pass
    Avignon Pass
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  • Season program book 2013-2014
    Season program book 2013-2014
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    Park by the Ramparts
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Avignon

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    The Rhône River

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 20, 2014

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    The Rhône River starts in the Swiss Alps. It flows into and out of Lake Geneva (Lac Leman in French), so Lake Geneva could be thought of as a very wide and deep part of the Rhône. At the lower (=west) end of the lake, the Rhône has a brief moment of glory as one of the world’s cleanest rivers as it flows through the city of Geneva, the reason for this unusual cleanliness being that all the gunk has settled to the bottom of the lake. But after a few hundred meters the first tributary comes in, and the murkiness resumes.

    By the time the Rhône reaches Avignon it is seriously polluted. You can row on it, as these people are doing, but you shouldn’t swim in it and certainly not drink the water.

    Second photo: I took this photo from the Daladier Bridge, a modern bridge that now connects Avignon with Barthelasse Island and Villeneuve lez Avignon.
    The Daladier Bridge has one of the narrowest bike lanes I have ever cycled on, and the sidewalk isn’t very wide either, so it is not a pleasant bridge for cyclists or pedestrians – but the view is nice, if you can find a place to stop and take a picture.

    Third photo: The Rhône and the historic Saint Bénezet Bridge, as seen from Barthelasse Island.

    Fourth photo: The Rhône is especially picturesque when viewed from a distance. Up close, it turns out to be quite scummy in places.

    Fifth photo: When I visited the Grand Gallery of Evolution in Paris in 2012 I found this model showing the increasing pollution of the Rhône River as it flows through France down to the sea. Reportedly the Rhône has accumulated such dangerous levels of PCBs – polychlorinated biphenyls – that the French government has outlawed the consumption of fish from the entire length of the Rhône, from the Swiss border all the way down to the Mediterranean.

    See also:
    The Rhône River on my Lyon page.

    Next: Shuttle boat (Navette)

    Rowing on the Rh��ne The Rh��ne from Daladier Bridge Rh��ne and bridge from the island Scum in the Rh��ne Pollution of the Rh��ne

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    Opéra Grand Avignon

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 4, 2014

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    This theater was built in 1846-47 to replace an earlier theater that had been destroyed by fire. For many years it was called Opéra-Théâtre d’Avignon or just Opéra d’Avignon, but on January 1, 2013 it was given a classy new name, so now it is officially known as the Opéra Grand Avignon.

    The reason for this is that the opera is now supported not only by the financially strapped city of Avignon, but by Avignon and fourteen surrounding cities and towns which have joined together to form the agglomération of Grand Avignon.

    For the benefit of my fellow Anglophones, I should point out that the name Grand Avignon does not necessarily mean they have delusions of grandeur. Grand simply means large or larger.

    Also the word agglomération needs a bit of explanation, since it has mainly negative connotations in English but not in French. The English dictionary on my desk defines agglomeration as “a confused mass or pile” and gives as an example sentence: “The town is surrounded by agglomerations of ugly new houses.” But in French the connotations are neutral or even positive. The French word agglomération (pronunciation here) means simply a city and its suburbs and nearby towns which have joined together to cooperate in various ways, without totally giving up their independence.

    In addition to running and financing the opera house, the “Communauté d'agglomération du Grand Avignon” (to give it its full name) is responsible for economic development, land use, environmental protection and public transport. The bike sharing system Vélopop’ is a project of Grand Avignon, as is the proposed new tramway.

    In most parts of France, the mayor of the largest city is usually also the president of the agglomération, but this is not the case in Grand Avignon (as of 2014) because the mayor of Avignon, Cécile Helle, is a Socialist while the Conservatives have a majority in most of the surrounding area. So at present the mayor of Villeneuve lez Avignon, Jean-Marc Roubaud, is the president of Grand Avignon, even though his town is much smaller than Avignon itself.

    Second photo: These statues of the playwrights Corneille (1606-1684) and Molière (1622-1673) are located to the left and right of the front entrance to the theater. Corneille was best known for his tragedies and Molière for his comedies, so nineteenth-century French theaters liked to display statues of both to show that they performed both genres (unlike earlier theaters which specialized in one or the other).

    Third photo: The façade of the theater lit up at night.

    Fourth and fifth photos: Spectators outside the theater after a performance.

    Address: 1 Rue Racine, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Place de l’Horloge, next door to the City Hall
    Location and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: +33 4 90 14 26 00
    Website: http://operagrandavignon.fr/en

    Next: In the opera house

    Corneille and Moli��re
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    In the opera house

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 4, 2014

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    The auditorium of the opera house is arranged in the notorious ‘Italian style’ with horseshoe-shaped balconies, meaning that those sitting off to the sides of the balconies do not necessarily have a full view of the stage. This arrangement was popular in the nineteenth century and earlier – popular especially among those who could afford to pay for the more expensive seats in the center. The Opéra Grand Avignon has seats for 1,120 spectators.

    Second photo: Here the stage is set up for a concert performance.

    Third photo: This door is now nothing more than a quaint reminiscence from the nineteenth century. The gold letters read: LOGE DE M LE MAIRE, which means the Loge of His Honor the Mayor (literally ‘Loge of Mister the Mayor’). Since the current mayor is a woman, Cécile Helle, this is something of an anachronism, quite apart from the fact that mayors don’t usually get this sort of special privileges any more.

    Fourth photo: This is the Mayor’s Loge, which was empty on the night I was there.

    Fifth photo: Program book of the Opéra Grand Avignon for the 2013/2014 season. There are only five fully staged opera productions per year, but they have a wide variety of other programming such as musical, ballet, chamber music, symphony concerts and plays.

    Address: 1 Rue Racine, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Place de l’Horloge, next door to the City Hall
    Location and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: +33 4 90 14 26 00
    Website: http://operagrandavignon.fr/en

    Next: Le Dilettante d'Avignon

    Auditorium Stage arranged for a concert Door to the box of the mayor The box of the mayor Season program book 2013-2014
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    Tourist Office at Square Agricol Perdiguier

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 4, 2014

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    The city tourist office is just a five-minute walk from the central railroad station, straight ahead through the Porte de la République and along the main street Cours Jean Jaurès.

    This is the starting point for their guided walking tours (in French only) of the Old Town and the Palace of the Popes. You can also book the tours here, but I booked mine online a week in advance to be sure of getting a place. The cost was € 19.50, which included admission to the Popes’ Palace.

    Second photo: One thing you should definitely do at the tourist office is pick up an Avignon Pass. Unlike most passes in other cities, this one is free, so you don’t have to set up a spreadsheet to figure out if it is a good value. The way this pass works is that you pay the full price at the first place you visit. Ask them to stamp your Avignon Pass, and then it entitles you to a discount at all the other listed places in Avignon and even across the river in Villeneuve lez Avignon.

    Third photo: Next to the tourist office is a park called Square Agricol Perdiguier and the former church Saint Martial, which fell into disuse after the French Revolution and is now a Protestant Temple. (Location and photo on monumentum.fr.)

    The square was named after Agricol Perdiguier (1805-1875), a French writer and politician who was active during the revolution of 1830 and later in the second and third French Republics. (‘Agricol’ was a fairly common first name in southern France in the 18th and 19th centuries, but is no longer used today.)

    Address: 41 Cours Jean Jaurès, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Next to Square Agricol Perdiguier.
    Phone: +33(0)4 32 74 32 74
    Website: http://www.avignon-tourisme.com/home-1-2.html

    Next: Guided walking tour

    Tourist Office Avignon Pass Square Agricol Perdiguier

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    Guided walking tour

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 3, 2014

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    On a Saturday afternoon I took a guided walking tour, organized by the city tourist office, called Avignon au temps des Papes (Avignon in the time of the Popes). This was a tour not only of the Old Town of Avignon, but also of the Palace of the Popes. Entrance to the Palace was included in the price of the tour.

    Our guide, Christine, spoke very clearly, without a microphone, and was easy to understand despite the wind. We were in the second day of a Mistral, a strong cold wind which she explained could last anywhere from one or two days up to a week or more. (As it happened, this one only lasted two days. The next day was rainy but not windy.)

    Second photo: Starting at the city tourist office on Cours Jean Jaurès, she led us through the narrow streets of the Old Town, pointing out buildings that had been started in the time of the Popes, such as the livrées cardinalices that served as luxurious residences for the wealthy cardinals.

    Third photo: At Place Saint Didier, an inscription on the wall reminds us that in medieval times this was the site of a market for wood and pigs.

    On this square there is a church, also called Saint-Didier, which was built between 1356 and 1359 during the reign of the fifth Avignon Pope, Innocent VI. The church was built in the style called gothique méridional or even gothique avignonnais. (Location and photo on monumentum.fr.)

    Adjoining the Place Saint-Didier there were two livrées, the mansions of the two richest and most powerful cardinals in the city, Pampelone and Ceccano.

    (Our guide didn’t say this, but I got the impression that being a cardinal was a sure way to get rich in the fourteenth century, sort of like being the CEO of a hedge-fund today.)

    Fourth photo: The Church of St. Pierre, on the square of the same name, was also begun during the reign of Pope Innnocent VI. (Location and photo on monumentum.fr.)

    Fifth photo: Our tour group on the way up to the Palace of the Popes.

    Next: Guided tour of the Popes’ Palace

    Our tour guide Tour group in the Old Town Place St. Didier Square and Church of St. Pierre On the way up to the Palace of the Popes
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    Petit Palais Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 2, 2014

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    This ‘small palace’ is small only when compared to the huge Palace of the Popes on the same square, but by any other standards the Petit Palais is itself a large building, and it is filled to the brim with outstanding medieval religious artworks.

    To my relief, most of these artworks do not depict saints being martyred in hideous ways (as in the off-putting collection at the State Gallery in Augsburg, for example). On the contrary, most of the scenes are quite peaceful, like this first one by Florentine painter Neri di Bicci (1419-1491) of the Crowning of the Virgin.

    What I find particularly interesting about this painting is that several of the angels are playing musical instruments such as were commonly used in Florence in the fifteenth century.

    Second photo: There are only a few mild excursions into sadomasochism, such as this sculpture of a bored-looking Christ perfunctorily flogging Saint Elzéar of Sabran (1285-1323). The third figure, who seems to be clutching her breast and waiting impatiently for her turn, is presumably Elzéar’s virtuous wife Delphine of Glandèves (1284–1358), with whom he lived a life of chastity, prayer, charity and mortification of the flesh.

    Third photo: I find it interesting to observe how the devil is depicted in these old paintings. Here, in the Vierge du secours by the Italian painter Giovanni Pagani (1465-1544), the devil is black (racism?) and has wings like a bat, a tail like a rat, profuse pubic hair and three-clawed feet. The Virgin’s facial expression is mild, but in her right hand she is holding a big stick and threatening to hit the devil, presumably to protect the frightened boy holding her left hand.

    Fourth photo: Statues in the museum.

    Fifth photo: The courtyard of the museum.

    Address: Palais des archevêques, Place du Palais, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Location and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: +33 4 90 86 44 58
    Website: http://www.petit-palais.org/

    Next: Lapidaire Museum

    Crowning of the Virgin Christ flogging Saint Elz��ar The Virgin to the Rescue Statues in the museum Courtyard of the museum
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    Lapidaire Museum

    by Nemorino Written Jul 2, 2014

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    Granted that the fourteenth century was the most significant in Avignon’s history, because of the Popes and the Papal Court and all the Cardinals and scholars and hangers-on, it does no harm to learn that the city existed long before that. The earliest remains are two graves and some furniture, flints and tools from around 3000 BC.

    The Lapidaire Museum, in the old chapel of the College of the Jesuits from the 17th century, contains the archeological collections of the Calvet Museum, which have been on display here since 1933. The collections include “Egyptian, Gallo-Roman, early Christian and medieval sculptures,” as well as vases and ancient glassware.

    After picking up your Avignon Pass at the tourist office, it would make sense to go straight to the Lapidaire Museum as your first museum visit. It is only a block away from the tourist office and is a good introduction to the early history of Avignon, before the coming of the Popes.

    Another more mundane reason for making this your first museum visit is that this is the cheapest museum in Avignon, so if you pay the full price here (two Euros as of 2014) and get your Avignon pass stamped, you can later get reductions at the other more expensive museums and monuments.

    Address: 27 Rue de la République, 84000 Avignon
    Phone: +33 4 90 85 75 38
    Website: http://www.avignon.fr/en/musees/lapidaireen.php

    Next: Angladon Museum

    Lapidaire Museum Lapidaire Museum Ancient gravestones Entrance to the museum
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    Angladon Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 2, 2014

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    This mansion in the center of Avignon, just behind the Lapidaire Museum, was once the home of Jean and Paulette Angladon-Dubrujeaud, the heirs of a famous Parisian couturier and art collector, Jacques Doucet.

    The upper floor of the house has remained much as it was when the donors lived there, with a “medieval and Renaissance room”, an artists’ studio, a “Chinese room” and a living room with art works and 18th century furniture.

    In my first photo, the painting on the easel is a winter landscape by Alfred Sisley (1839-1899). Some of Sisley’s best-known paintings are on display on the fifth floor of the Orsay Museum in Paris.

    Second photo: A painting by the eighteenth century painter Charles François Grenier de Lacroix, also known as Charles François Lacroix de Marseille. He was born in Marseille around 1700 and died in Berlin around 1779 or 1782. This painting is a typical idyllic maritime scene of the type that was popular in the 17th and 18th centuries, with sailing ships, towers and temples at sunrise or sunset. The most famous paintings of this type are probably those by Claude Lorrain at the Louvre in Paris.

    Third and fourth photos: When I went to the Angladon Museum in Avignon in 2014 they had a popular temporary exposition on the ground floor about the painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901).

    Fifth photo: Until the spring of 2013 I don’t think I had never even heard of the painter Tsuguharu Foujita (1886-1968). But then on a guided walking tour of the Montparnasse district of Paris we were shown the courtyard of the building where Foujita’s atelier used to be, and later in Reims I saw the Chapelle Notre Dame de la Paix, popularly known as Foujita’s chapel, which he decorated single-handedly at age 80 after his belated conversion to Roman Catholicism. And in the Angladon Museum in Avignon I saw these two paintings, showing the artist himself and his wife. (I’m still not too impressed, but apparently some people are.)

    Address: 5 Rue Laboureur, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Location on OpenStreetMap
    Phone: +33 4 90 82 29 03
    Website: http://www.angladon.com/

    Next: Louis Vouland Museum

    Winter landscape by Sisley 18th century harbor scene Toulouse-Lautrec exhibit Toulouse-Lautrec exhibit Paintings by Foujita
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    Louis Vouland Museum

    by Nemorino Written Jul 1, 2014

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    Louis Vouland (1883-1973) was a rich industrialist who owned a factory in the Champfleury district of Avignon (south of the city center) for making industrial food products. He started his factory in 1911 and managed to get a monopoly on the importation of ‘zebu’ beef from Madagascar. Using this beef, he invented a product known unofficially as the boite à singe (‘monkey box’), which he sold in great quantities to the French army for feeding troops in the field during the First World War. This product was the forerunner of what is now known as ‘corned beef’. (Perhaps also a forerunner of ‘spam’, a staple of American field rations during the Second World War.)

    In the 1920s and 30s Vouland’s factory was reputed to be very modern and efficient and was famous for its ‘Mireille’ sausages. The factory was destroyed in the Second World War during a night of bombing in May 1944, but was rebuilt afterwards, bigger and better than before.

    During the Trente Glorieuses (The Glorious Thirty), meaning the thirty years of unusually rapid economic growth between 1945 and 1975, Vouland’s enterprise played a major role in the regional economy of Avignon and vicinity. Because he died in 1973, Vouland did not live to see the end of the Trente Glorieuses and the return to a more normal and less spectacular period of economic activity.

    Throughout his years of getting rich on corned beef and sausages, Louis Vouland was also a passionate art collector. He collected art works and objects of all types, often from the period of Louis XV (who reigned from 1715 to 1774) and Louis XVI (from 1774 until the French Revolution). Vouland’s collection is now on display in his former residence at 17 Rue Victor Hugo, which has been turned into a museum.

    Second photo: The entrance to the museum.

    Third photo: Unfortunately no photography is allowed in the museum, so I can’t show you any of the items on display, but this poster on a nearby street corner gives an impression of what the museum is like.

    Fourth photo: The museum and other buildings on Rue Victor Hugo.

    Address: 17 rue Victor Hugo, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Location on OpenStreetMap
    Phone: +33 (0)4 90 86 03 79
    Website: http://www.vouland.com/

    Next: Calvet Museum

    Louis Vouland Museum Entrance to the museum Poster on the next street corner Rue Victor Hugo
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    Calvet Museum

    by Nemorino Written Jul 1, 2014

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    The main building of the Calvet Museum is this mansion on Rue Joseph Vernet. The mansion was built from 1741 to 1754 for a family called Villeneuve-Martignan, and the museum has been located here since 1835.

    The street was named after the eighteenth century painter Joseph Vernet (1714-1789). Many of his paintings are on display in the Galerie Vernet of the museum. Joseph Vernet’s son, grandson and great-grandson also became well-known painters during their lifetimes.

    Second photo: The courtyard of the museum.

    Third photo: In the Calvet Museum I was surprised to find an early sculpture by Camille Claudel (1864–1943), showing her brother Paul as a young Roman, dressed in a toga. (See also: Camille Claudel at the Rodin Museum on my Paris page.)

    Fourth photo: This sculpture, Moissonneuse endormie by Louis Veray (1820-1891), shows a young female harvest worker (note the sickle by her side) who has apparently fallen asleep on the job. This is said to be an example of the ‘official’ conventional sort of sculpture that was common in the middle of the nineteenth century.

    Fifth photo: The Vernet family was not the only dynasty of famous painters in Avignon. These busts are of six painters from the Parrocel family, spanning several generations.

    Address: 65 Rue Joseph Vernet, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Location and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: +33 4 90 86 33 84
    Website: http://www.musee-calvet-avignon.com/

    Next: Paintings in the Calvet museum

    Calvet Museum entrance Calvet Museum courtyard Sculpture by Camille Claudel Sculpture by Louis Veray Busts of six painters
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    Paintings in the Calvet Museum

    by Nemorino Written Jun 30, 2014

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    Of all the paintings I saw in the Calvet Museum, the one that surprised me the most was this one (first photo) called Ugolin et ses fils (Ugolino and his sons) by Charles-Hippolyte-Émile Lecomte-Vernet (1821-1900).

    On orders of his mortal enemy, the Archbishop, Ugolino and his sons have been imprisoned in a tower and left there to starve to death, the keys having been thrown into the river. At least two of the sons seem to be unconscious, but one is wide awake and is pleading with his father to eat their bodies after they die, so at least the father will survive.

    What surprised me is that this depiction is so different from the well-known sculpture by Auguste Rodin. In Rodin’s version, all the figures are naked and in agony. In Lecomte-Vernet’s painting, they are clean and fully clothed, and at least the two main figures look positively aristocratic – which of course in real life they were.

    To see the contrast, have a look at my review of Ugolino and his children, by Auguste Rodin on my Paris page.

    As I explained in that review, there really was a man named Ugolino della Gherardesca who lived in the thirteenth century, from about 1220 to 1289. He was an Italian count who betrayed his city and his allies. He is remembered today primarily because his story was told by Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) in his Divine Comedy – in the Inferno part, of course. In Dante’s version, Ugolino was punished for his sins of betrayal and cannibalism by being condemned to eternal torture in the ninth circle of hell – along with his enemy, the Archbishop.

    Second photo: Les Las (The Weary) was painted in 1897 by Jules Adler (1865-1952). This large painting of exhausted workers and their families was inspired by Émile Zola’s novel L’Assommoir.

    Third photo: This is a maritime scene by Joseph Vernet (1714-1789), showing a port with a temple at sunrise. If I have understood correctly, Joseph Vernet was the great-grandfather of Charles-Hippolyte-Émile Lecomte-Vernet.

    Fourth photo: This Baigneuse endormie (a bather who has fallen asleep) was painted in 1850 by Théodore Chassériau (1819-1856).

    Fifth photo: This view of the Palace of the Popes in Avignon was painted in 1845 by Jules-Romain Joyant (1803-1854).

    Address: 65 Rue Joseph Vernet, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Location and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: +33 4 90 86 33 84
    Website: http://www.musee-calvet-avignon.com/

    Next: City Hall

    Lecomte-Vernet, Ugolin et ses fils, 1852 Les Las (The Weary) by Jules Adler, 1897 Maritime scene by Joseph Vernet Baigneuse endormie by Th��odore Chass��riau Palace of the Popes by Jules-Romain Joyant, 1845
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    City Hall (Hôtel de Ville)

    by Nemorino Written Jun 30, 2014

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    The Avignon City Hall is next door to the opera house on the city’s main square, the Place de l’Horloge (Square of the Clock). You can’t see the clock, because it is hidden behind the City Hall.

    Second photo: City Hall window, with flags.

    Third photo: Inside the City Hall, with lots of flags.

    Fourth photo: Place de l’Horloge (Square of the Clock), with the City Hall and nearby buildings.

    Address: Place de l’Horloge, 84000 Avignon
    Directions: Next door to the Opéra Grand Avignon.
    Location and photo on monumentum.fr.
    Phone: 04 90 80 80 00
    Website: http://avignonfrance.ca/attractions/avignon-city-hall.html

    Next: Place Pie

    H��tel de Ville City Hall window Inside the City Hall Square of the Clock
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    Place Pie

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 30, 2014

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    This is a large, lively square with several cafés and restaurants that seem to be popular with students and other local people. In the background off to the right behind the trees in the first photo is the city’s covered market hall.

    As you may have guessed, the name of this square has nothing to do with the English word pie. When the square was laid out in the sixteenth century, it was named after the then-reigning pope Pius IV (known as 'Pie IV' in French). This was an Italian man named Giovanni Angelo Medici di Marignano, who was pope from 1559 to 1565. (He resided in Rome, of course, because the popes had left Avignon nearly two hundred years earlier.)

    Fourth photo: This painting by Pierre Grivolas (1823-1906) is on display in the Calvet Museum. It shows Place Pie as it looked in 1868.

    Directions: Vélopop’ station 02.

    Next: Place des Corps Saints

    Place Pie Place Pie Place Pie Place Pie in 1868
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    Place des Corps Saints

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 30, 2014

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    In earlier times this was a cemetery for poor people, but now it is a shady little square with cafés, restaurants and a fountain in the middle, and the old Church of the Cèlistins in the background.

    During the Avignon Festival in July this must be a busy place, because one of the slimier pizza restaurants has a notice in its menu saying that they do not change pizza toppings during the festival.

    I can’t claim to have tried all the restaurants here, but some of them do look a bit dubious. As a rule of thumb, just avoid restaurants that have ‘Trip Advisor’ stickers in their windows, and you should be all right.

    As an uninitiated foreigner, I was puzzled by the name of this square. Holy Bodies? Saintly Bodies? More likely they mean Holy Relics or at least the bodies of various saints who were buried here. The first apparently was a young cardinal named Pierre de Luxembourg, who died in 1387. In accordance with his last wishes, he was buried here in the cemetery for poor people. Later, in 1674, the relics of Saint Bénézet were removed from the bridge which bears his name (because the bridge kept falling down and was not a safe place to store relics) and placed in the Church of the Célestins.

    Directions: Location and photo on monumentum.fr.

    Next: Les Demoiselles d'Avignon

    Place des Corps Saints Place des Corps Saints Place des Corps Saints
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    Centennial Monument

    by Nemorino Written Jun 29, 2014

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    This Centennial Monument (Monument du Centenaire) was put up in the year 1891 to commemorate an important event that had happened a hundred years before.

    The event was that in 1791, during the French Revolution, Avignon finally became a part of France, which it hadn’t been up to then.

    Originally the monument stood on the main square of Avignon, the Place de l’Horloge, in front of the opera house and the city hall, but it was moved to its current location in 1974. I’m not surprised that the monument was moved, since it was designed in a style of nineteenth-century pathos that not many people can identify with today.

    Fourth photo: At the base of the monument there is a quotation from the speech given by the mayor of Avignon in 1891, pointing out that during its long history Avignon had been conquered three times by different kings of France, but always resisted and never really became a part of France until it did so voluntarily during the French Revolution.

    Address: Boulevard de l’Oulle, Avignon
    Directions: GPS 4°47'57" East / 43°56'50" North
    Website: http://www.petit-patrimoine.com/fiche-petit-patrimoine.php?id_pp=84007_3

    Next: The Ramparts

    Centennial Monument Avignon joined France in 1791 Avignon joined France in 1791
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Avignon Hotels

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    € 53,36/ 350 FF per night, with shower. (2001) I'm sure we paid much less in the early 90s and...

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  • Hotel Le Colbert

    Small hotel type marries family, managed by the proprietary marriage, who they have decorated it in...

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