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    A RHINO ON ISLAND IF?

    by balhannah Written Sep 10, 2012

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    Favorite thing: This is one of the stories that I read about while in the Chateau d'If. I even saw a drawing from the old times of the Rhinoceros.

    It's TRUE.......

    THIS IS THE STORY.....
    A rhinoceros had been presented by the King of Gujarat in India to the King of Portugal who, in turn, decided to pass it on to Pope Leo X. The Rhino, as it was going to a very important person, was 'dressed' in a gilt-iron chain and a green velvet collar decorated with gilt roses and carnations.".....Have you got the picture in your mind!!!

    As it happened, on its way from Lisbon to Rome, the Ship had to make a stop-over at the Island If, at this time, there wasn't a Chateau. The Rhino remained as an attraction for several weeks, before he was on his way to Rome again, only for the Ship to be struck with bad seas and wrecked!
    Poor Rhino, he wasn't able to be rescued alive, but they did bring the dead Rhino ashore, and had him stuffed so he could still be presented to the Pope!

    Love it, I do!

    Castle drawing of the Rhino
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    TOILETS

    by balhannah Written Sep 10, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Toilets seemed to be scarse in Marseille, so much so, that we went to the Tourist Information Centre to find out where some were located.
    I can't remember where they were, only somewhere close to the Old Port.
    Look for a building the same as in my photo, and you have found them. Men & Women use the same Toilet.

    Marseille Toilet Marseille Toilet
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    MARSEILLE CITY PASS

    by balhannah Written Sep 9, 2012

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    Favorite thing: This is the name of the Pass I bought for our full day in Marseille.

    I listed what we wanted to see and do, then checked it against the card. As it happened, by buying the card, we came out in front.

    The CARDS COST IN 2012....
    City Pass 1 day : 22 €
    City Pass 2 days : 29 €

    So, what does it cover........

    Boat and visit to If Castle
    Tour with the tourist train to Notre Dame de la Garde
    1 guided tour proposed by the Tourist Office according to the program
    One day transport ticket
    Free acces to 14 museums
    Guided Tours of the town (Panier, Saint-Victor, Longchamp…)
    Reduced rates and 10% discount at certified boutiques
    Discounted price : sightseeing tour by open-deck coach and other events.
    10% discount for boat excursions with Croisiere Marseille Calanques, Icard Maritime et Bleu Evasion( Boat with solar energy).

    Museums ARE CLOSED every Monday and on bank holidays



    http://www.marseille-tourisme.com/en/to-organize-your-stay/city-pass-short-break/book-your-city-pass/

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    ARRIVING BY CRUISE SHIP

    by balhannah Written Sep 9, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Our Cruise ship offered a return shuttle bus service into Marseille for quite a hefty price.

    I had checked public transport, and found there was some close by.
    Our Cruise ship docked at the Place de la Joliette, known as La Port Autonome de Marseille.
    We walked to the end of the pier, then caught a Bus into the City centre.
    I read the Port is not pedestrian-friendly, which was true, it was an awkward walk because of footpaths or lack of. It probably took us 20mins to find where to catch the Bus, as we couldn't find the metro [Joliette station] which is meant to be right outside the terminal.

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    Ugly architecture

    by tini58de Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Marseille has some absolutely beautiful architecture, but I have very seldom seen so much ugly architure in one place at a time!!! In the most beautiful spots they have erected sterile concrete blocks which might be nice to live in, but are extremely ugly to look at! I don't have many pictures, because that is nothing that you really want to remember, but the main picture is a blatant example of what I mean!

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    Marseille under construction

    by tini58de Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    Favorite thing: When we visited in November 2006 (and March 2007), there was a lot of construction work going on throughout Marseille. Streets (like the first part of the Canabiere near the Bourse or the street in front to the Cathedral) were torn up, but also buildings were being restored and/or under scaffolding, so there were some disturbances in what I otherwise found to be a very beautiful city! But you can't have it all, and maybe next time it will all be even more beautiful thanks to the renovations!

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    Restaurants in Rue Saint

    by chicabonita Updated Mar 6, 2007

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    Favorite thing: If you're looking for a restaurant don't miss Rue Saint! Here you will find several restaurants. If I remember correct most were French cuisine. We found a few we wanted to try ... but only tried two of them

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    Travel guides

    by chicabonita Updated Mar 6, 2007

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    Favorite thing: If you know some French I can highly recommend to buy Le Guide du Routard for Marseille as it offers many adresses, tips and information. Some may say that Guide du Routard is the French version of Lonely Planet. It was very helpful because we didn't find a German travel guide just for Marseille, there is only the combination with Provence and the section about Marseille is usually not very big.

    You even could get some discounts or a free drink in some restaurants when representing the guide. We got a free breakfast in our hotel every day due to the guide.

    Also the Marseille cartoville was quite handy as the maps give a good overview and there are tipps for every area.

    Guide Routard - Marseille

    Cartoville - Marseille

    Studying Le guide du Routard Cartoville gives a good overview
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    Marseilles - History II

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 21, 2006

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    Favorite thing: 1481 Marseilles and Provence are united to the Kingdom of France
    On his death bed, Charles II dictated his will by which he left Provence to Louis XI. This meant that the city was absorbed into the Kingdom of France. However, this union, which had been much sought after by the trading community, who saw the advantages in abolishing the frontiers which isolated them from the fairs in Lyons, did not bring peace. An arsenal was built and a fleet of warships had to be reconstituted. Marseilles was to prove its allegiance to the monarchy.
    In 1516 Francois I visited the city which received him with much pomp and ceremony. Miranda, the King's commissioner, had the city's ramparts reconstructed.
    The Chateau d’If was built to defend the bay from marauders.
    In 1535, Francois I formed an allegiance with the enemies of Christianity, the Turks. This treaty gave Marseilles a major role in trade with the East. At the same time as it expanded as a trading centre, Marseilles also developed as a naval base.

    Marseilles - Notre Dame
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    Marseille - History IV

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 21, 2006

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    Favorite thing: During the Second World War Marseilles was bombarded several times and some districts around the Vieux Port were destroyed.
    Today Marseilles still keeps traces of its tumultuous past: in turn free and then dominated, rich and poor, crucible of different cultures, this ancient city with its origins dating from the beginnings of European history, is a modern, attractive and bustling city. Marseilles has a powerful charm which encourages the visitor to stroll through its old districts around the Vieux Port, in the gardens of its recently revealed Phocaean remains or those of Longchamps Palace and, of course, on the esplanade of Notre Dame de la Garde Cathedral overlooking the city.

    Marseille
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    Marseille - History III

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 21, 2006

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    Favorite thing: HENRI IV of FRANCE - Marseilles was declared a free port. It prospered and grew in spite of many political disputes.
    1720 - The city was stricken by the worst plague in its history during which 38,000 of its population died.
    1789 The French Revolution and Marseilles. - A battalion of voluntary patriots was sent to Paris. They sang Roget de 1'Isle's hymn written for the Rhine Army. This was to retain their name, the Marseillaise, and be adopted as the national anthem. It was during the Second Empire that Marseilles took on its present day form with the building of the rue Imperiale, now called the rue de la Republique and the erection of splendid monuments, Longchamps Palace, the Stock Exchange, Pharo Palace, etc., which until then had been absent from the city. The Second Empire was the period during which the city took on a more "bourgeois" appearance. Nevertheless, the visitor to Marsilles will doubtless be struck by the absence of splendid middle-class town houses or monuments dating from the prosperous periods in the city's history. This can be partly explained by the fact that the middle-classes were primarily business people, mainly involved in trade. Tacitus, a historian and moralist living during the Roman era, had already mentioned the lack of monuments and observed that this was also the case in Phocaea, Marseilles' founding city.

    Marseille
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    Marseilles - History

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 21, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Xth century - King Conrad the Peaceful granted Arlulfe sovereign rights over the region of Trets. Arlulfe was to be the ancestor of a line of Marseilles Viscounts who governed until the 12th century.
    XIIth century the Republic of Marseilles - Marseilles was governed according to its own legislation which was gathered in five volumes to form a code of statutes for the city. Power was in the hands of a Council of twelve rectors. In 1221, the population appointed a Podesta, a magistrate specialised in municipal administration. Marseilles issued its own money. 1246 –1343 Marseilles united to the Kingdom of Anjou
    Charles d'Anjou, who became the Count of Marseilles through his marriage to Beatrice, pursued a policy of annexations. After surviving many intrigues Marseilles finally had to submit. The city lost its commercial independence but retained certain legal and economic privileges.

    Marseilles
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    Cité Radieuse-3: Upon the roof ...

    by BeChar Updated Jun 21, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The roof, accessible by the lift (floor '9') is a terrace that has been adorned with shaped concrete utility parts. The perimeter (more than 350 m) can be used for jogging; musculation and fitness are possible in the gymnasium and there is a (outside) pool for
    small children and benches.

    Unfortunately working on the roof in May 2005...

    Building Le Corbusier: roof
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    La Cité-Radieuse 2: Inside

    by BeChar Written Jun 21, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The Glorious City was designed to be "a town in the town". 1600 people live there in more than 300 apartments from 23 different configurations accommodating single persons up to 10 members families. The building incorporates a wide range of services like crêche, shops, sport facilities, a theatre and a hotel-restaurant.

    You can see an apartment preserved and furnished as in the 1950s by calling the building +33 4 91 77 81 74, or the Hôtel Le Corbusier +33 4 91 167800.

    Inside building

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    La Cité Radieuse-1: Outside

    by BeChar Updated Jun 21, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The "Glorious city" is a residential building designed in 1947 by Le Corbusier (Charles-
    Edouard Jeanneret) and finished in 1952. The architecture was unique in using glass
    and concrete. The result is a 50,000 ton building (160x24 m and 56 m high), supported by concrete pillars. Deep balconies and bright colors (red, green, yellow) are other particular external features.

    6 such buildings were planned, but only one was realised.

    Very good architectural reference at galinsky.

    Le Corbusier building
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