Marseille Off The Beaten Path

  • Abbaye Saint-Victor (Marseille, France)
    Abbaye Saint-Victor (Marseille, France)
    by Redang
  • Art or vandalism?
    Art or vandalism?
    by bisous333
  • The shop front
    The shop front
    by bisous333

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Marseille

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    Rough concrete building on legs !

    by JLBG Updated Jan 7, 2006

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    Rough concrete building on legs !
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    Le Corbusier was a Swiss and French architect, leader of the International Style of architecture, born October 6, 1887, died August 27, 1965. His architectural theory of the ideal house was a "machine for living".

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    The whole building is built on strong reinforced concrete legs that give it an aerial look though the general look is very massive, with extensive use of concrete, without any unnecessary adornments. Le Corbusier is one of the main instigators of modern, functional architecture.

    Le Corbusier was the first who dared using raw concrete as a décor of its own. Of course, the formworks have to be especially good looking so that the figure of the boards will make an artwork, without anything added. This is now something widely admitted and practiced but in 1952, that was often considered as shocking !

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    La Cité Radieuse, the streets

    by JLBG Updated Jan 7, 2006

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    La Cit�� Radieuse, the streets
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    At each level, the "streets" are much wider than corridors and permanently lit. The walls are either covered with wood (first photo) or made of rough concrete or of "granito" (small pebbles embedded in the concrete but showing) (second photo).

    Letterboxes are not all together at the ground level as usually but at each level, at the end of the "street"

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Le Corbusier, La Cité Radieuse

    by JLBG Updated Jan 17, 2005

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    Le Corbusier, La Cit�� Radieuse
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    Designed by Le Corbusier after World War II and completed in 1952, the "Unité d'habitation" in Marseille, France was envisioned as a "machine for living in." When it was built, the people in Marseille called it "la maison du fada" (the house of the cracked one) !

    One level of the building is now a hotel. Look at my hotel tip.

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    La Cité Radieuse, the principles

    by JLBG Updated Jan 7, 2006

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    La Cit�� Radieuse, the principles

    The lobby of the building can be visited. A poster reminds the basic principles of its structure. "In the living unit, apartments are grouped by pairs, fitting one into the other tête-bêche along corridors called inside streets… The typical apartment is built on 2 levels, as a house. The living room is full height (4.80 m) with a 3.66 m glass window that gives an unobstructed view on the landscape.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Chateau d’If

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2012

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    Marseille - Chateau d'If
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    Marseilles' bay is enclosed and protected by three offshore islands. The smallest, the Chateau d'If, is the best known.
    The island was fortified by Frangais I in 1524 to defend the approaches to Marseilles from an attack by sea.

    At the end of the 16th century, the work was completed by the walls which surround the island, a church and a guard house. Indeed well calculated and the Chateau d'If acted as deterrent by discouraging any potential attackers.

    In 1634, the Chateau d'If became a state prison. Assuch it received many famous prisoners including the brother of the King of Poland (1638), Mirabeau and many others.

    The most famous of all is doubtless Edmond Dantes, fictional hero of Alexandre Dumas' the "Count of Monte Cristo".
    These days fiction has become fact and his cell is open to visitors (a national monument since 1926)!

    You can watch my 2 min 59 sec Video Chateau d'If out of my Youtube channel.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Inspired by Le Corbusier !

    by JLBG Written Dec 27, 2004

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    Close to the "Cité radieuse" of Le Corbusier stands a building which has been built recently and of which I do not know the name of the architect. However, I took its picture because I felt that it was beyond any evidence deeply inspired by Le Corbusier. Actually, there are plenty of spiritual sons of Le Corbusier !

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    Emergency exit !

    by JLBG Updated Dec 27, 2004

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    For Le Corbusier, in a building, everything had to be functional and there was no fancy décor added. On the other hand, instead of hiding, for example emergency exits, he thought them as a part of the scenery. He associates straight lines and curves with a great sense of harmony.

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    Aix

    by albert34 Written Dec 15, 2007

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    Instead of travelling by train,the bus (navette) from Saint Charles bus station in Marseille is cheaper,twice quicker and more frequent.
    This picture shows the popular confectioner's La Cure Gourmande in Place de l'Hotel de Ville.There is another shop of La C.Gourmande in Marseille,19 rue La Canebière.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Building on legs !

    by JLBG Written Dec 27, 2004

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    The whole building is built on strong reinforced concrete legs that give it an aerial look though the general look is very massive, with extensive use of concrete, without any unnecessary adornments. Le Corbusier is one of the main instigators of modern, functional architecture.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Same inspiration, different result !

    by JLBG Written Dec 27, 2004

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    Not very far from the "Cité radieuse" of Le Corbusier, in the direction of the University of Marseille at Luminy, I also took this picture of two recent buildings. It was late afternoon, the light was perfect for a picture. However, I feel that even if the architect has taken some inspiration from Le Corbusier, he has not taken the best.

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    La Cité Radieuse, the landscape

    by JLBG Written Jan 7, 2006

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    La Cit�� Radieuse, the landscape
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    From the terrace of La Cité Radieuse, you have an unobstructed view on the whole city.

    The first photo shows the southwards view towards the city center, the Vieux-Port and the open sea.

    The second photo shows the view southwestwards with the islands in the background.

    The third photo shows the southeastwards view.

    The last photo shows the northeastwards view, inland.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    La Cité Radieuse, the terrace

    by JLBG Written Jan 7, 2006

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    La Cit�� Radieuse, the terrace
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    A terrace tops the whole building. Anybody can go and visit it, with its gorgeous landscape. I suppose there are not many visitors, otherwise, it would not remain as a free access !

    Everything is made of raw concrete and the facilities (air exhaust, central heating, etc…) are used as element of the décor. There is a small swimming pool, empty but we were in December. There is also a meeting room (second photo).

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    La Cité Radieuse, the shops, bar and restaurant

    by JLBG Written Jan 7, 2006

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    La Cit�� Radieuse, the  bar and restaurant
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    The Cité Radieuse was thought as a unit of living and it should have been possible to live entirely inside, not having to go outside. The third and fourth levels were shopping malls. There were all kinds of shops. Along the time, most have closed and are now apartments. They have closed at the same time than, in the city centers, small proximity shops have closed as people preferred more and more to make their shopping in supermarkets, on the outskirts of the cities.

    In the Cité Radieuse remain only a "Boulangerie Patisserie" (Baker and Pastry shop) that embalms the air with baking bread scents and a hotel, restaurant and bar. Look at my hotel tip and at my restaurant tip.

    The bar works as a small city bar, with regular visitors. The restaurant has not many customers (on our visit, we were the only ones) but every week-end, they organize special events. The owners and managers live in the building and are obviously great admirers of Le Corbusier. There are a lot of Le Corbusier data, books, etc on display in the bar.

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  • bisous333's Profile Photo

    A taste of Madagascar in Marseille

    by bisous333 Updated May 20, 2008

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    The shop front
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    My friend that I stayed with is Malagasy and also with my impending mission to the country in Ocotber, I couldn't resist the chance to have a taste of the country by venturing to this rather fascinating Malagasy shop in the older town area of Marseille.

    The owner spoke for a looong time with my friend in Malagche, so she had to translate after we left. It's got all you may be interested in, food, games, artefacts, toys, books to learn Malagache, maps, flags, whatever you'd expect from a shop that gave you a real taste of a country.

    After my visit there, I became more excited about my upcoming mission.

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    Jardin Pierre Puget

    by rwlittle Written Sep 19, 2004

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    statue in Jardin Pierre Puget, Marseille

    We snapped this photo of a statue of A. Pierre Puget, with a small waterfall behind, at Jardin Pierre Puget. This was a nice little familar park, which we encountered as we walked up from the old harbor (Vieux Port) to see Notre Dame de la Garde.

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