Cathédrale de la Major, Marseille

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  • Cathédrale de la Major
    by Nemorino
  • Cathédrale de la Major
    by Nemorino
  • Cathédrale de la Major
    by Nemorino
  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Cathédrale Sainte-Marie-Majeure

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 11, 2013

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    This unusual cathedral was built in the nineteenth century in Romano-Byzantine style. They say it is the only one of its kind in France.

    Construction of this cathedral took forty-one years, from 1852 to 1893. (So I suppose we shouldn’t be too impatient with some of the big construction projects in Germany that are only eight or nine years behind schedule.)

    On our guided walking tour we had a look at the cathedral (outside only), before going on to the nearby Fort Saint-Jean.

    Second photo: The cathedral with a construction site in the foreground, 2012.

    Third photo: The cathedral as seen from the boat, the Frioul If Express.

    Fourth photo: A mural on the wall of a building in front of the cathedral.

    Next stop on our guided walking tour: Fort Saint Jean

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    Cathedrale de la Major

    by maykal Written Nov 11, 2012

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    Cathedrale de la Major
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    For a cathedral in a major city, it does seem a bit forgotten and isolated, stuck on the wrong side of a busy road at the wrong end of Quartier du Panier, wedged between a motorway tunnel and the ferry docks. Notices on fences around the cathedral show the authorities have grand plans to reincorporate the cathedral into the city by way of gardens and pedestrian walkways, but for now it's a bit cut off, but that's not a reason to skip it.

    Similar to the Basilique de Notre Dame on the hilltop across the Vieux Port, the cathedral was built in the 19th century in Byzantine-Roman style, all ornate domes and stripy black and white walls. Inside, it is nowhere near as colourful as the Notre Dame basilica, but much more peaceful (the tourist trains don't seem to bother with this one) and still impressive.

    An older cathedral sits even more ignored to the side of the new cathedral, almost like an annex. I hadn't realised that it was actually a separate church, and only took a photo of it because there happened to be a boules match going on outside.

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    THE NEW MAJOR CATHEDRAL - "NOUVELLE MAJOR"

    by balhannah Written Sep 9, 2012

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    Nouvelle Major
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    I was glad we were walking as I think if we had taken the Shuttle into the city centre, we would have missed seeing this lovely Cathedral.

    The "New Major" is the Cathedral of Marseille and is one of the most important national monuments in France. A Roman Catholic Church, it has been a Basilica minor since 1896. What a sight it was, a huge grey & white striped building built in Romanesque style and overlooking the harbour

    I read its proportions are comparable to Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome: 142 metres long with a central cupola - the sixth largest in the world - soaring up to 70 metres at its highest point. It can accommodate 3,000 people.
    The Cathedral doors were closed, I believe it's being restored, so no inside look for me! I read it is very nice inside, and has elaborate mosaic floors.

    I walked around the Cathedral, and this is well worth doing. I found plenty of statues, plus the views from here are wonderful.

    OPENING HOURS
    Tuesday - Thursday..9am-noon & 2:30p-5:30pm
    Friday - Sunday 2:30p-6pm
    Closed Mondays.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Modern Cathedral

    by hquittner Updated May 17, 2011
    The 19C La Majeur
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    The new Cathedral or "Sainte-Marie-Majeur" is called Neo-Byzantine. It was built between 1852 and 1893. Really it is a fine neo-Romanesque church. The only outside elements that are Byzantine are the little domes on the top of the west towers. It is the longest French church built since the Middle Ages. The length is 460 feet and the height is 197 feet. This and the immediately adjoining previous cathedral should be entered.

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Standing tall

    by tini58de Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This 19th century cathedral was built in the neo-Romano-Byzantine style, the same style as Notre Dame de la Guarde. I must say, walking around the corner and suddenly seeing this imposing building was quite breathtaking!

    Unfortunately in November 2006 the area around the cathedral was under heavy construction, so we were not able to cross the street and get to see the cathedral from the inside. For those of you who are curious anyway, click on the link below!

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    La Major Cathedral

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 29, 2007

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    Marseille - La Major Cathedral

    Two churches on a same site answer to this name. One is very old and the other contemporary.
    The present day cathedral, which stands on the banks of the Joliette district, is the work of architects Vaudoyer and Esperandieu. Started in 1852, it was completed at the beginning of the 20th century. Its inspiration is Bysanttine, richly built from variaety of materials (Calissane and Gard stone, green stone from Florence, white marble from Carrare, onyx from Italy, mosaics from Venice etc.).

    It was built to sumtuos dimensions: 20 m high central nave, 142 m long with 17,7 diameter dome. This building which may be thought heavy in style, casts a shadow over the more modest but very beautiful Major Cathedral or Sainte Marie Cathedral. In Romanesque style, this Cathedral is the oldest church in Marseille.

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  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Cathédrale de la Major

    by JanPeter74 Written Nov 16, 2005

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    Cath��drale de la Major
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    This was one of the largest cathedrals (approximately 135m long) built in Europe in the 19th century. It was built between 1852 and 1893. The interior is adorned with mosaic floors and red-and-white marble, whereas the exterior is in Romanesque-Byzantine style. The building has almost swallowed its 12th-century Romanesque predecessor (originally a baptistery) that was built on the ruins of a Temple of Diana. When looking at the building it is definitely impressive. Whether or not it is beautiful, people might disagree on.

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  • BeChar's Profile Photo

    R17) Cathedrale (Nouvelle major)

    by BeChar Updated Jun 7, 2005

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    Cathedrale de la Major

    This Roman-Byzantine cathedral was built from 1852 till 1893 (Plans: L. Vaudoyer, H. ESPERANDIEU for domes and H. REVOIL for decoration) on the remains of the ancient
    Roman-Provençal "Major" building (12th Century). Beautiful decoration (marble, porphyr). With a capacity of 3000 seats, it is the largest cathedral in France.

    With the cathedral in the back, follow "Esplanade de la Tourette" in the direction of Fort St John.

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  • eden_teuling's Profile Photo

    THE MAJOR CATHEDRAL(S) OF MARSEILLE.....

    by eden_teuling Written Jan 4, 2005

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    CATHEDRAL(S) MARSEILLE...

    Two churches at the same site answer to this name! One is very old and the other one ) is contemporary.

    The present-day Cathedral, which stands on the banks of the JOLIETTE district, is the work of the architects Vaudoyer and Espérandieu.

    Started in 1852, it was completed at the beginning of the 20th Century.
    Ites inspiration is BYZANTINE, richly built from a variety of materials (Calissane and Gard stone, green stone from Florence, Italy, white marble from Carrare, Italy, onyx from Italy, mosaics from Venice, etc.).

    It has sumptuous dimensions: 20 m high nave, 142 m long with 17,70 m diameter dome.

    This building, which may be thought heavy in style, casts a shadow over the more modest but very beautiful Major or Sainte Marie Majeure cathedral (see photograph). This was built in Romanesque style and is without doubt the oldest church in Marseille.

    The evidently largest baptistery in Gaul already existed on this site in the 5th Century.

    The Cathedral was laid to sack by the Saracens in 923 and then reconsructed in the 112th and 12th Centuries...

    Both very impressive and worth the walk through the old city centre, which already is a pleasure an sich!

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    Marseille's largest cathedral

    by rwlittle Written Sep 24, 2004

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    Cathedrale de la Major & Fort St. Jean, Marseille

    Cathedrale de la Major is one of Europe's largest cathedrals built in the 19th century. Its exterior has the feel of both Romanesque and Byzantine churches. The cathedral is built right next to its 12th century Romanesque predecessor, almost swallowing it up.

    We snapped this photo of the cathedral from Parc du Pharo...the photo also shows Fort St. Jean, guarding the other side of the entrance to Vieux-Port.

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  • aliante1981's Profile Photo

    Cathédrale de la nouvelle Major

    by aliante1981 Written Jan 17, 2004

    Marseille seems to me to have an extraordinary number of cathedrals, at least in name. And Cathedrale de le nouvelle Major is one of them. This is an imposing 19th century building in the pseudo Romanesque-Byzantine style. The interior decoration is a lavish one - as was usual when the architects followed Byzantine style - in marble and porphyry.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Cathedral la Major

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 13, 2003

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    Green stone from Florence, white marble from Carrare, Calissane and Gard stone, onyx from Italy and mosaics from Venice make up most of the materials used to build this Byzantine inspired Cathedral. Although impressive I could not say it was beautiful. The different colored marble and stones make it unique but not necessarily classic. While we were in Marseille the cathedral was being worked on and there was partial scaffolding on one side of it.

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  • alectrevor's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by alectrevor Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    Cathedral
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    this cathedral is in area of Gare Maritime where the ferries go to Corsica etc. The cathedral is a 19th century building in romanesque style.

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  • Huks's Profile Photo

    Very impressive Cathedral

    by Huks Written Aug 21, 2007

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    Very impressive - right?

    This Byzantine style church looks really very impressive and inside has mosaic floors. This 19th century building is worth to visiting and this sight is located nearby to Vieux Port.

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  • Pierre_Rouss's Profile Photo

    Cathédrale de la Major

    by Pierre_Rouss Updated Oct 20, 2002

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    A nice old white cathedral that was looking over the sailors of Marseille.
    Classification: Museums , Photography , Site Seeing

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