Füssen Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Bavavia
  • HOHES SCHLOSS
    HOHES SCHLOSS
    by balhannah
  • HOHES SCHLOSS
    HOHES SCHLOSS
    by balhannah

Most Recent Things to Do in Füssen

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Kurfuerstliches Schloss

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 6, 2015

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The construction of the Castle started in 1291 and finished in 1504. The Castle has late Gothic appearance. It was required more than two centuries to finish construction of this Castle at the top of the hill of Schlossberg. The "Hohes Schloß" - once the domicile of the Augsburg Archbishops - stands sentinel above the historic town of Füssen. It’s idyllically situated in the Alpine foothills.

    The "Hohes Schloss" (High Castle) is one of Swabia's largest and best preserved late Gothic castle complexes. One hall of the Castle is used as a concert hall, a collection of late Gothic paintings and sculptures are exposed in other halls.

    You can watch my 5 min 55 sec Video Füssen once again out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    State Gallery

    Fuessen - Kurfuerstliches Schloss
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Schlossberg

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 6, 2015

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The history of the city began at the hill of Schlossberg. In III century Romans have chosen this hill for erection of the strengthening. This rocky hill occupies favorable position above the Lech River and by its nature it is as though intended for construction of a fortress or a castle on it.

    As Fuessen is situated on the well-known Emperor August-road from Rome to northern German grounds of the great Roman Empire the construction of the fortress was caused by necessity of protection this road from attacks of barbarians.

    You can watch my 5 min 34 sec Video Füssen out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Fuessen - Schlossberg
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Linderhof - the inside story

    by iandsmith Updated Oct 9, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From my emails:
    "The tours of the palace were only in German (they have to have a minimum of 15 for a specific guide) but they do have excellent and easy to read sheets and you just tack on to the back of a tour.
    The exterior's classical excellence is only exceeded by the baroque and rococo-gone-mad interior. It has been compared to the Palace of Versailles, and Ludwig was a huge admirer of Louis XV, but this is only about one hundredth the size.
    In the quality stakes however, it certainly loses nothing. Not since the Palacio Real in Madrid have I been as impressed with a room as I was here.
    The master bedroom and the dining room (with a still working lift that lowers the dining table beneath the floor so it's out of sight) are masterpieces of design and the effect when all the candles are lit and reflected in the massive mirrors of the dining room is something you can't begin to imagine.
    There are only 8 rooms, the main four forming the points of a cross, while the corner rooms are called closets. Mind you, with walls of pure silk, stunningly framed portraits adorning them and the rococo rolls everywhere, they bore little resemblance to any closet I have ever seen."
    For mine, at times, it bordered on overkill but was nonetheless amazing for that.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Enter the castles

    by iandsmith Updated Oct 8, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Of course, you've come to Fussen or Schwangau or any of the outlying villages to see Neuschwanstein. If you don't already know, there are several others in the area. My advice, for what it's worth, is to allow time to do more than just visit one. There's a lot more this area has to offer.
    Fate took me to Hohenschwangau first. I alighted from the bus and went to get a ticket for Neuschwanstein. "Sorry, it's closed today." It's a constant source of amazement to me that places such as the Green Vault at Dresden and Neuschwanstein even contemplate shutting. They have a captive audience 365 days of the year and to shut over 50 of them surprises me. Still, governments have their reasons.
    Anyhow, I bought a ticket and chose to walk up to Neuschwanstein first before my tour commenced, English language tours not as frequent as German ones naturally.
    Our guide was rugged up in a long coat with layers beneath while I walked in with just my shirt on after walking for the last hour and a half.
    He looked at me knowingly when I queried that it must be cold in here, though my doubtful tone and look didn't go unnoticed.
    He was a good guide, taking time to explain things clearly and elaborating when asked (usually by me as I have an insatiable curiousity).

    Classic castle shape Hohenschwangau from the Neuschwanstein walk Note swan on top
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Neuscwanstein and Hohenschwangau Castles

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jun 15, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hohenschwangau was looking good during our visit but Neuschwanstein which is normally magnificent was being renovated and was covered in scaffolding. Work on Neuschwanstein will continue into 2013.

    You can walk to the castles from Fussen in around 40 minutes. It is about 3KM. There is also a bus from Fussen Train Station.

    I've been inside the castles years ago, but not recently. Nowadays I enjoy walking to them and swimming in the lakes near them.

    Entry fee was 12 Euro for each castle for adults. There is also a museum to visit, too.

    There are shops and restaurants next to the castles. Souvenir shops that is.

    My husband in front of Hohenschwangau. Neuschwanstein in the distance not at its best.
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Walderlebniszentrum (forest experience centre)

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The Forest Experience Centre Ziegelwies is found south of Füssen; from Bad Faulenbach it’s a 15-minutes-walk to that place. There’s a nice exhibition which gives information about the forest, bees and ants. Parts of the exhibition are interactive, for example there’s something to smell and you can test how a snow slide is working. And you also can watch real bees in a hive.
    Outside then there are two paths that you can take, the “Auwaldpfad” (lowland forest path) with a lengths of 1,5 km and the “Bergwaldpfad” (mountain forest path) with a length of 1,7 km. They are also building a tree top walk which is supposed to open in spring 2013.
    We took the Auwaldpfad which is close to the Lech river. It’s rather something for kids, but we also enjoyed it. We even tried the slide down from the centre... On the path, you’ll pass a “tree telephone”, then there’s a trunk of a tree for balancing and you can try several different ways on crossing the rivulet like a tree trunk bridge, a plank bridge or a float. Especially that float was nice! You also can do a detour to the Lechfall which is not far away.

    Open Tuesday to Friday from 10 to 16, during school holidays also on week-ends. No admission.

    Walderlebniszentrum - Auwaldpfad Walderlebniszentrum - slide Walderlebniszentrum Walderlebniszentrum - Auwaldpfad
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    City park/ arboretum

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The “Baumgarten” (arboretum) is a nice park between the old town of Füssen and Bad Faulenbach, located on a hill. There already used to be a herb garden around 1500, and in the 17th century, there probably was a baroque garden. In 1897, an elevated tank was built to supply Füssen with drinking water. It looks interesting as it’s disguised as ruins! At that time the garden was designed with several paths and various trees, partly forming alleys. If you walk from Füssen to Bad Faulenbach or vice versa, this park is a nice alternative way than following the Lech river.

    Baumgarten Baumgarten - elevated tank Baumgarten - elevated tank
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Weißensee

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    Weißensee is a lake near Füssen and also the name of a village that belongs to Füssen. We only did a short visit of the lake and found some free parking spaces outside of Oberkirch at the street. From there it’s just a short way down to the lake. There’s a hiking path of about 6km around the lake which seems nice. And for warm summer days, there’s also a beach at the lake.
    The Weißensee is located west of Füssen and is just one of the many lakes you find around Füssen. A much larger one is the Forggensee in the north, but there are also several smaller ones nearby.

    Wei��ensee Wei��ensee Wei��ensee
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Bad Faulenbach & Lech waterfall

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    Bad Faulenbach is a small spa village that is part of Füssen. The village is located in a valley and you can walk to it from the old town of Füssen in about 15 minutes. In Bad Faulenbach, there’s a “park of the senses” and you have several smaller lakes nearby where you can walk around. Also, the Lechfall is close by – that’s an artificial waterfall of the Lech river. We had a hotel in that village and found it a good starting point for sightseeing and hiking. See my %L[]Bad Faulenbach page for more information.

    Park of the senses - barefoot path Lech waterfall

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Kalvarienberg

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The Kalvarienberg is a hill opposite of the old town, on the other side of the Lech river. But it’s more than that: Actually the Kalvarienberg (Calvary in English) is the place where Jesus was crucified (mostly called Golgotha), but the name Kalvarienberg is also used for sculptures representing the crucification, usually on a hill. So that’s what you find on that hill, together with a Stations of the Cross when you walk up the northern side. It’s a very interesting path up the hill, with several little chapels with paintings of the scenes of the Way of the Cross. Lots of the buildings date from the 19th century, like the Marienkapelle (St Mary chapel) which is a larger chapel about half way up the hill. On the top of the hill, or rather in the top, there’s a chapel with a shrine showing the dead Jesus Christ. A tunnel leads to that chapel, and there’s another corridor with several paintings.
    On the top then there’s a platform, next to the three crosses. From there you have a fantastic view! You can see the Schwansee and castle Neuschwanstein with all the mountains around, and in the other direction there is Füssen and its surroundings.South of the town

    Kalvarienberg Kalvarienberg - Marienkapelle Kalvarienberg - view on Schwansee and castles Kalvarienberg - view on F��ssen
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Town wall

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The first town wall was built in the 13th century when Füssen received its official status as a city. Several gate towers were added in 1330, and later in the early 15th century it also got a battlement parapet with gabled roofs. After 1812 then, many parts of the town wall got dismantled and all three main gates don’t exist anymore. At least parts of the expansion along the Lech and the eastern part of the town are still there, so that you can see some stretches of a town wall and some towers.

    Town wall Tower of the town wall
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Heilig-Geist-Spitalkirche (Holy Ghoast church)

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The Holy Ghost Infirmary Church was built 1748 as rococo church. Next to it was the infirmary, which took in old, poor and sick citizens .Already the colouful facade is eye-catching. It’s showing the Holy Trinity as well as large figures of St Florian and St Christopher. I wonder whether Florian, the patron saint of firefighters, was chosen as the earlier church did burn down in 1733.

    Heilig-Geist-Kirche Heilig-Geist-Kirche Heilig-Geist-Kirche
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Hohes Schloss / Castle of Füssen

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The castle used to be owned by the bishopric of Augsburg, and between 1486 and 1505 was transformed into a representative residence. Nowadays, it’s used as museum/ gallery and also as finance office. What I found really nice is the facade, you will find illusionistic paintings from 1499 there, showing windows and other details. They are very well made and are unique amongst German late-gothic architecture.

    Open April to October except Monday from 11:00 to 17:00.

    Hohes Schloss zu F��ssen Hohes Schloss zu F��ssen - illusionistic painting Hohes Schloss zu F��ssen Hohes Schloss zu F��ssen
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Basilica St Mang

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The church St Mang is a nice, bright church with lots to see. It’s a medieval basilica that was turned into a baroque church in the early 18th century. The basilica belongs to the St Mang monastery. The church dedicated to St Magnus and you can see that at various places – for example there’s a crypt with a Magnus fresco, and a ceiling fresco with pictures about the Magnus legend.

    St Mang basilica St Mang basilica St Mang basilica - crypt St Mang basilica
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    St Mang Monastery

    by himalia11 Written Oct 17, 2012

    The St Mang Monastery was a Benedicte monastery which was already founded in the 9th century. In 1687, the previous building was replaced by a baroque complex with Venetian elements. Due to the Secularisation, the monastery was dissolved in 1802. Later, the town acquired the monastery building and used the north wing as town hall. In the south wing, you now find the “Museum der Stadt Füssen”. This museum gives information on the history of the monastery, the town and the local manufacturing of lutes and violins, and includes a visit of the baroque ceremonial rooms and the Anna chapel.

    St Mang monastery St Mang monastery - town hall
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Füssen

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

55 travelers online now

Comments

Füssen Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Füssen things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Füssen sightseeing.

View all Füssen hotels