Garmisch-Partenkirchen Sports & Outdoors

  • cross-country skiing
    cross-country skiing
    by MrBill
  • cross-country skiing
    cross-country skiing
    by MrBill
  • Parasailing
    Parasailing
    by Imaniac

Most Recent Sports & Outdoors in Garmisch-Partenkirchen

  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    downhill skiing

    by MrBill Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    skier Bernie Haslam  photo by Nick Sloane

    I used to like skiing in Garmisch-Partenkirchen a lot. It was a great little mountain to have in my backyard.

    I don't want to sound like a spoiled brat, but it seems that the Gemeinde Garmisch-Partenkirchen have done everything possible to ruin the skiing experience in GAP? They have built a new Kreuzeck gondola, which is super fast compared to the old one, but in exchange they closed the Wank bahn and several connector lifts on the mountain. This has had the effect of channeling more skiers onto fewer runs and causing longer lift lines.

    On the Alpspitz they closed the T-bar at the top, and now you have to ski all the way to the mid-station to catch the chairlift back up. This entails a long, flat, ski-out on a cat track, which is death for snowboarders. Then they run the double ski lift at half-capacity because they need to pick-up passengers half-way up the mountain who are skiing the short run at the top.

    Equipment: They also closed the smaller T-bar on the Oesterfelder, which was a nice run to warm-up on. This means skiers now have to shoot the gap (another cat walk) and then ski all the way around to the mid-station gondola for a ride back up. There is a flat section so you have to keep your speed up or you risk having to pole later on the flats. This usually means you waste some good verticle feet of skiing.

    They closed the Wank, which was a nice release valve for when GAP got too busy on the weekends. The Wank used to have a nice small ski hill feeling and usually only locals went there. Now if GAP is too crowded, locals will either drive to Lermoos & Ehrwald or to Seefeld in Austria.

    These moves were designed to save money, but they have resulted in GAP becoming less fun to ski at. This is surely an unintended consequence. Perhaps the solution was not to close lifts, but to partially privatise the ski areas and allow expansion.

    I still love GAP, but I would not book a week long ski holiday there anymore.

    Related to:
    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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    always wear suncream

    by MrBill Updated Apr 4, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    source: www.pizbuin.com

    Do not forget your sun lotion. You should always have it on. Not only does it protect your skin against harmful UV rays, but also against drying out in the wind and cold. Most ski instructors and ski patrollers have dried leather for skin when they get older. You want to protect yourself with a high UV factor suncream. Apply generously. After sweating heavily, re-apply. Re-apply at lunchtime as well. Wear a ball cap with a brim. Don't forget the sun bounces off the snow as well as comes from above, so don't forget to apply behind your ears, under your chin, on your neck, your wrists and hands if they are exposed, etc. Each square inch of skin should be covered with clothing or sun cream. The sun is stronger than you think at 3000m.

    ''During the winter time use double the sun protection factor than during the summer time. The UV rays are being reflected by snow and ice and also intensified by 13% per 1000 meters altitude. Moreover 80% of UV radiation is reflected by snow and sand.

    Equipment: Dehydration is one of the main problems for the skin in winter due to dry air and cold temperatures. It may induce redness, chapping and cracks in the skin and can also worsen premature skin ageing. This is even more the case if you practice snow sports as wind and cold can further dehydrate your skin. Use a sun protection cream specially designed for winter, with appropriate protection against UV radiation as well as against dry skin, cold and wind" Source: www.pizbuin.com

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Skiing and Boarding

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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    cross country skiing - 3 -

    by MrBill Written Jan 12, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    do not walk

    There are so many walking trails in and around Garmisch. They are all well marked and many are maintained in winter. However, ski trails are not walking paths for you or for your dog. The ski trails are clearly marked with this sign indicating DO NOT WALK on the trail. It destroys the perfect grooming needed for classic cross country skiing. Also, when every where is white and clean, it is almost disgusting to see where dogs and relieved themselves everywhere. Please have some common curtiousy and respect the cross country skiers, their trails, and everyone's right to a clean environment. Thanks.

    Equipment: Cross country ski equipment can be bought for between EUR150-300 depending on your ability and the quality. A set can be rented for about EUR10 per day. Needless to say, it is usually better to rent if you are only going to do it a few times, and do not know if you like it? Also, spring close out sales are the perfect time to pick-up last year's models and save up to 50-70% on new. Ski heil!

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Skiing and Boarding

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    cross country skiing 2 -

    by MrBill Written Jan 12, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    cross-country skiing

    Within Garmisch the two trails branch out from the Hausberg Lodge - one in the direction of the Olympic Stadium, which is about 4 kms of trails, and the other in the direction of Grainau, which is about 8 kms in total. Therefore, within the city you can ski up to 12 kms and never be more than a few minutes away from the warmth and heat of one of the many lodges or restaurants along the base of the mountain between the Hausberg and Alpspitzbahn.

    Equipment: Cross country ski equipment can be bought for between EUR150-300 depending on your ability and the quality. A set can be rented for about EUR10 per day. Needless to say, it is usually better to rent if you are only going to do it a few times, and do not know if you like it? Also, spring close out sales are the perfect time to pick-up last year's models and save up to 50-70% on new. Ski heil!

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Skiing and Boarding

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    cross country skiing in and around GAP

    by MrBill Written Jan 12, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    cross-country skiing

    There are many cross country trails in and around GAP and towards Klais and Seeheld in the direction of Innsbruck, and around Ehrwald, Lermoos and Bieberwier in the other direction. The elevation in GAP is between 700-800 meters and the snow only typically lasts 6-8 weeks before warm weather and/or rain destroys the crosscountry ski trails. The other areas around GAP are higher up to 1000 meters so they hold the snow a little better.

    Equipment: Cross country ski equipment can be bought for between EUR150-300 depending on your ability and the quality. A set can be rented for about EUR10 per day. Needless to say, it is usually better to rent if you are only going to do it a few times, and do not know if you like it? Also, spring close out sales are the perfect time to pick-up last year's models and save up to 50-70% on new. Ski heil!

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Skiing and Boarding

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    carry a shovel in your knapsack

    by MrBill Written Sep 9, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ortovox adjustable shovel

    I usally carry a shovel, probe poles, a first aid kit, a water bottle, a Swiss Army knife or Leatherman, a whisle, fruit & granola bars, gum, lip balm, sunblock, a dry under layer, ski goggles, an emergency blanket, and a water proof cushion to sit on in my 25-litre knapsack. And, sometimes my 0.5 litre thermos of coffee if its cold. Drinking warm water is better than cold water when it is cold out.

    I wear my gortex outlayer - ski pants and ski jacket with hood - with the following layered underneath.

    Synthetic=Polyester-nylon-wool blend.

    Synthetic socks, underwear, t-shirt, shirt, fleece or fleece vest, and then I take off what I do not need and keep it my knapsack. I wear thick, jockey short style underwear for a little extra warmth for sitting on those cold chairlifts.

    Of course, if it Springtime I might wear lighter variations, but on a glacier you have to be prepared for minus 20 degrees to above zero and sunny and warm. The best is to wear layers and be prepared to change often. You want to avoid sweating profusely and then freezing, which is not easy when you are working hard. Therefore, it is not good to be dressed too warm, but good to have extra clothes in your pack.

    Equipment: I have switched to a 3-in-1 glove system. The outer, leather and gortex glove has very little insulation and is ideal most of the time. When I am ski touring or cross country skiing, I often only wear the glove liners. Then if it is cold, they can be combined. They are so light, I always have them with me in my pack.

    Good sunglasses are a must. As is a hat and or a touque depending on how cold and windy it is. I wear a ski hat, as normal ballcaps will blow off with a sudden gust of wind or when you are skiing. Also, ski hats have ear flaps which make me look like Elmer Fudd, but I can accept that.

    Related to:
    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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    wear an avalanche transceiver

    by MrBill Written Sep 9, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ortovox transmitter & receiver

    Serious skiers never go off-piste alone. They always ski in groups. Each member of the group should have an avalanche transceiver (make sure its turned on and you know how to use it), avalanche probe poles, and a shovel. Usually, you have these in your knapsack along with your first aid kit, a Swiss Army knife, a bottle of water, and some food. Each time you go out on the mountain, you should be prepared to spend a night on the mountain in an emergency. Therefore, it is also good to carry extra dry clothing, especially a dry underlayer, which is light, but worth its weight in gold on a cold day and even more when you are forced to overnight on the mountain.

    Related to:
    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Skijumping on new year's day

    by sabsi Written Jan 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Simon Ammann in the air!

    Every year on new year's day there's the "Neujahrsskispringen" in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. It's the 2nd stage of the annual four hill tournament (Vierschanzentournee). It's an amazing atmosphere here, 20000 people screeming "Ziiiieh" for every jumper.

    Equipment: You definitely need a ticket in advance if you don't want to risk the event being sold out in the end. Then you need to dress warmly because even when it's sunny it can get quite cold in the shade. Warm shoes are most important, you will stand here for quite a long time so the feet will get cold otherwise! A camera with a zoom and flags to cheer for your favourite jumpers are good to have, too. But you will get all sorts of free advertising such as flags, caps etc here, too.

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  • Imaniac's Profile Photo

    Parasailing

    by Imaniac Written Oct 17, 2003
    Parasailing

    In the winter you can ski at the famous new years day skiing area. But in the summer this hills make a good place to go parasailing. Especially for people who haven't done it before.

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