Ingolstadt Things to Do

  • The Old Anatomy
    The Old Anatomy
    by Kathrin_E
  • deer (in Wildpark)
    deer (in Wildpark)
    by iaint
  • the bison
    the bison
    by iaint

Most Recent Things to Do in Ingolstadt

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    AUDI Museum

    by iaint Written Dec 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    an older - very classy - model
    4 more images

    The museum is located at the AUDI Forum - the round building. It’s all very high tech and sophisticated.

    It houses a wide range of vehicles going back to the early 20th century and some - especially the older ones - are beautiful. They also have quite a few motorcycles on display.

    A centrepiece is a revolving display of modern models, but sadly it had broken down when we were there. The cars could still be seen, but not all from close up. Some of the rally cars and the Le Mans model were extra interesting.

    Highly recommended if you're a petrolhead, and also if (like me) you're not.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • agepiroshiki's Profile Photo

    Audi Museum Mobile of Audi Forum Ingolstadt

    by agepiroshiki Written Aug 22, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Audi Museum Mobile
    1 more image

    I visited in August 2011.

    History of Audi company is shown in the museum. You can see various cars and motorcycles with stylish bodies (especially, old typed ones) and why the Audi symbol of 4 circles were formed.

    Besides the museum, there are an Audi goods shop and a cafe in the area. You can enjoy German beer and talking about Audi.

    Admission fee w/o guided tour costs 2 euro.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • chuying's Profile Photo

    Everything for Audi

    by chuying Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Audi Marketing dept.

    Audi Museum, 2-hrs plant tour is very interesting and informative. No photos allow inside the plant. It's fun to watch how sheets of steel to become a stylish sedan on-site. English guided tour 11:30am daily (may change). Since no one else booked the English tour, we had a "private tour" and were able to ask a lot of questions!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Alte Anatomie

    by iaint Updated Apr 3, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    lovely

    My walking tour was all about (i) getting a quick impression of the old town and (ii) deciding which things I'd like to come back to visit properly.

    This is on the "must see next time" list.

    It is the German Museum of the History of Medicine. Built in a baroque "orangerie" style starting in 1723, it was the medical faculty of the state university, and sits in a delightful garden full of plants with medicinal qualities (opium poppies, for example).

    We only took in the garden, and next time around I'll go inside!

    UPDATE!

    I did go around the inside in March 11. My guide was a local doctor, so I was very well informed! Well worth a few minutes.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Stadtmuseum - History of the City

    by Kathrin_E Written Mar 3, 2011
    Stadtmuseum in Kavalier Hepp
    1 more image

    The historical museum is located in Kavalier Hepp, a gate building of the 19th century fortress. The permanent exhibition presents the history of the city and region from prehistoric times to the present. The 50 small rooms present the historical eras and topics like stone age, ancient Romans, the foundation of the city in the early middle ages, the medieval town walls, the Duchy of Bayern-Ingolstadt, the university, the counter-reformation and the Jesuits, the magistrate and ist representation, coins, baroque art and lifestyle, the age of enlightenment, crafts, trade and traffic, religious life, the development of the city in the 19th and 20th century, industrialization, Nazi time and World War II, post-war development. The toy museum has been integrated into Stadtmuseum and fills two rooms with its exhibition of historical toys. Another department is dedicated to the river Danube and its significance for Europe. Then there are temporary exhibitions about changing topics.

    The museum is worth seeing to get a better idea of the city and its history, although the amount of details might be confusing. Probably the most spectacular exhibit is the stuffed white horse that the Swedish King Gustav Adolph rode during the 30 Year War. The poor horse was killed in battle in 1632 not far from here. A bit creepy... Article in German with some photos here

    Photography is strictly forbidden, so no pictures of the interior here. I have to note that I found museum staff a bit grumpy.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Münster Church

    by Kathrin_E Updated Feb 26, 2011
    M��nster steeples
    3 more images

    The mighty gothic church, impossible to overlook in the cityscape, is a relic of those times in the 15th century when Bayern-Ingolstadt was an independent Duchy and Ingolstadt its residential city. Like Neues Schloss, the church was built to express the status and the ambitions of the ruling Duke. The city had just been extended and surrounded with a new wall. A second parish was founded for the new quarters. The Münster was partly built as their parish church, but even more as the church of the ruling dynasty and their burial place. Duke Ludwig der Gebartete (Louis the Bearded) must have been incredibly worried about his worldly sins and his eternal welfare - he donated a foundation for 1000 poor but religious people who had to perform an everlasting prayer service according to a complicated schedule.

    The church was begun in 1425. Construction works lasted for almost 100 years. Then the works were stopped, although the steeples remained unfinished. It was named "Kirche zur Schönen Unserer Lieben Frau", Church of the Beautiful Our Dear Lady - the grammar is a bit strange in here.

    The position of the two western steeples is a particularity. They are not parallel to the nave but attached diagonally to the corners, just like the main tower of the New Palace. This seems to be an Ingolstadt particularity. The steeples are too small and too short for the huge nave.

    The church is open in the daytime through the doors of the side naves. The enormous gothic hall looks even more impressive inside. Details that should not be missed: the fantastic vaults of the small side chapels along both naves.
    Photos of the interior can be found here in this travelogue.

    Photo tip: the best spot to catch the enormous building without 'falling lines' is from the courtyard of Canisiuskonvikt (photo 4).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Münster Church: Treasure Chamber

    by Kathrin_E Written Feb 26, 2011
    M��nster treasure chamber
    1 more image

    The church treasures of the Münster parish are on display in the treasure chamber, which is located inside the southern steeple.
    Access is from inside the church. Entry is free. There is no one there standing guard, you just open the door and walk in.

    This treasure is incomplete, though. The most precious possessions of the church have disappeared in the secularization 200 years ago, when state authorities took the most valuable pieces because of the monetary value of the materials, and silver, gold and jewels went into the treasury of the Electorate, later Kingdom of Bavaria. Paintings show what these pieces looked like.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Maria de Victoria, the "Asam Church"

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jan 15, 2011
    Asam church
    4 more images

    This baroque jewel was built for the Jesuit college and for a Marian congregation of Ingolstadt citizens attached to the Jesuits in 1732 - 1736. The interior was created by the Brothers Asam. The fresco on the flat ceiling is known as the masterpiece of Cosmas Damian, the painter among the two.

    The fresco reflects Jesuit theology and ideas. It represents the worldwide mission. In the four corners we see the four (then known) continents: Asia and Europe above the altar, Africa and America at the opposite end. The central scene shows the Assumption of Mary.

    The painting is full of tricky perspectives that cause astonishing effects in the eye of the lookers-on. Like: In Africa (photo 3) there is a hunter aiming at a lion; when you walk the opposite nave the hunter's arrow keeps pointing at you. The temple above the choir grows larger when you approach the altar until it covers half the ceiling. When you walk/run towards the exit, watch Michael confronting Lucifer and his angels above the organ - looks as if the bad angels are indeed falling. And so on, there are several more. A guided tour that shows you these effects is worth joining. A small entrance fee applies and the person at the cash desk will happily guide you. Watching the tricks of the fresco requires quite a lot of walking and running around, as you have to see them from certain angles and then walk a certain way to see the changes - wind blowing into the fire, a tree falling and hitting a stag, and so on.

    However... Well, I had a really funny experience in there, I think this was the funniest guided tour I ever had in a church. The really sweet elderly man from the cash desk struggled hard to point out the peculiarities of the fresco to a group of visitors. That group was from Thailand (all of them medical professionals on the way to a congress in Prague, they stopped in Ingolstadt for the Museum of Medical History and a bit of sightseeing). All the Thais spoke good English but our guide's English was, well, limited. He herded them around and showed them where to look in English but the explanations what to look at came in Bavarian. Some desperate people in the group asked me if I could translate, and soon I was translating for the whole group, much appreciated by the guide. It was a big laugh for everyone involved. We were running all over the church, to and fro. He started telling us something and after three words I said, wait, I have to explain what that is - the 30 Year War, or whatever. It was hilarious.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    A visit to the church also includes the treasure chamber. The church's most treasured object is the large monstrance (photo 4) , considered the most precious of its kind in the world. Created by a goldsmith in Augsburg in 1708, it depicts the Battle of Lepanto (a battle between the fleets of the Christian Holy League and the Ottoman Empire in 1571, which the Christians allegedly won thanks to the help of the Virgin Mary).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Pecunia Europhaga, the Rarest Medical Plant

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jan 15, 2011
    Pecunia europhaga
    1 more image

    The rarest and most unusual plant that flourishes in the apothecary garden behind the Museum of Medical History deserves a special mentioning and a tip of its own. I have never seen this species anywhere else, it is really unique.

    What does it cure? Hmmm, maybe the doctor's bank account...

    Pecunia Europhaga translates to "the Euro-eating money plant". It is in fact a box to collect donations from visitors to the garden. A funny and clever one, though...
    When you put a coin into the slot and press the lever to make it fall, the metal flower of the thing opens (see photo 2).

    The plant is 'growing' at the entrance to the garden, impossible to overlook.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Herzogskasten - The "Duke Box"?!?

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jan 15, 2011
    Herzogskasten

    "Herzogskasten" can be translated, tongue-in-cheek, as "Duke Box". This building is the residential house of the 13th century castle in Ingolstadt. Here the Dukes of Bavaria stayed during their occasional visits to Ingolstadt before the construction of the new castle.

    Later on it served as grain storage and as the city's cash office (which explains the name: "Kasten" is the box the money was put into, and further on a word for the whole administration of said money box and its content). Nowadays it hosts the public library.

    The building is a plain rectangular block. Its only ornaments are the stepped gables on both sides. The small oriel on the western side is the choir of the palace chapel.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Bavarian Army Museum

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 15, 2011
    Vaulted hall on the ground floor
    4 more images

    Bayerisches Armeemuseum (Bavarian Army Museum) consists of two parts. The topics and exhibits from the middle ages to the 19th century are presented in Neues Schloss. An exhibition on World War I can be visited in Reduit Tilly on the opposite river bank, only a short walk away across the pedestrian bridge. The ticket is valid for both. Due to lack of time I only saw the exhibitions in Neues Schloss.

    I am not a war buff at all, but from a historian's point of view there is a lot on display which is of interest. So what were the things I found interesting?
    First of all, seeing the interior of the palace - there is no furniture left but there are gothic vaults on the lower, wooden ceilings on the upper floors, frescoes, stonemason door frames and such.
    The exhibit about the 30 Years War in the 17th century includes a collection of tiny models of weapons, cannons, carts and acrriages - these were the catalogue of a Nürnberg salesman (photo 5).
    The Turkish hall with items that were conquered or otherwise acquired during the wars against the Turks in the late 17th century.
    The large collection of embroidered banners.
    A temporary exhibition of photographs, recently taken, of what is left of the World War II fortifications along the coast of Dordogne.

    See the website for all practical details and up-to-date information.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Neues Schloss - New Castle

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jan 15, 2011
    Neues Schloss, riverside facade
    4 more images

    The castle is named the "new" because it was new in the 15th century. In 1392 the Duchy of Bavaria was divided among three heirs and Ingolstadt became a ducal residence. The present castle, Herzogskasten, was suitable for occasional stays but too small to accommodate a permanent court. Duke Ludwig der Gebratete ("the Bearded") decided to build a new castle on the southeastern corner of the town close to the river. His sister Isabeau was the Queen of France and Ludwig was well used to court life in more powerful and fashionable countries. So he started an ambitious project for his new home. The castle was only finished two generations later, though.

    The front of the main palace with the three towers is an eyecatcher from the other side of the river. The front is not regular. The main tower is attached diagonally to the corner of the building. This seems to be a local fashion - compare the steeples of Münster church.

    The main palace and a number of economy buildings surround a wide rectangular court. Access is either from Ludwigstraße, the main pedestrian street of the old town, over the bridge and through the baroque gate tower, or from the river bank up some stairs. The courtyard is free to access during the day but closed at nighttime.

    The main palace hosts the Bavarian Army Museum (see separate tip).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Taschentorturm - Another Gate Tower

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 14, 2011
    Town wall and Taschentorturm from Scherbelberg
    4 more images

    South of Kreuztor in direction towards the river a significant part of the town wall with towers is preserved. This wall protected a weak spot in the town's fortification, the point where a small stream entered the town. In later times when the wall had no longer a military value, houses were built against it. The ground outside the wall has since then been used as gardens by the inhabitants of those houses.

    Following the wall you'll soon reach another gate tower, painted white and crowned by stepped gables. It might be a bit younger than Kreuztor but not very much. The Taschentor and the adjacent part of the town wall is dated to the end of the 14th century. Taschentor is closed to car traffic, the gateway is for pedestrians and bikes only.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Kreuztor, Ingolstadt's Landmark

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 14, 2011
    Kreuztor and M��nster steeples
    4 more images

    Kreuztor on the western side of the old town is the most beautiful of its medieval gate towers. An inscription dates the gate to the year 1385. It is built from bricks with a few ornaments in white limestone.

    The old town gate is completely preserved. It still has the outer gatewhich is connected with the tower by walls on both sides to form a small bailey.

    Photographers: The gate tower and the steeples of Münster church behind make an impressive panorama from the outward side. Take care, though, when looking for the best spot to take a photo because this is a very busy intersection of three major streets. The best spot would be in the middle of a road. Beware.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    City Hall

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 13, 2011
    City hall
    4 more images

    Ingolstadt's city hall was first mentioned in 1321 but is probably even older. In the run of the centuries it has seen several changes. Its present appearance was shaped in 1883 when the old town hall, the chancellery and the adjacent parsonage of St Moritz were combined and refurbished with neorenaissance facades.

    The church of St Moritz with its big steeple, unfortunately behind scaffolding at the moment, is right behind the city hall. City hall and Moritzkirche together form a photogenic view (photo on my intro page) on the northern side of Rathausplatz, they seem to be one single complex of buildings but they aren't.

    The slender tower of the city hall used to be a watchtower. The tower is named Pfeifturm ("whistle tower") after the whistle of the watchman who lived up there.

    Better ignore the New City Hall on the Western side of the square, an ugly 1960s block.

    Important for visitors: The ground floor hosts the tourist information.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Ingolstadt

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

94 travelers online now

Comments

Ingolstadt Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Ingolstadt things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Ingolstadt sightseeing.

View all Ingolstadt hotels