Ingolstadt Things to Do

  • The Old Anatomy
    The Old Anatomy
    by Kathrin_E
  • deer (in Wildpark)
    deer (in Wildpark)
    by iaint
  • the bison
    the bison
    by iaint

Most Recent Things to Do in Ingolstadt

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    Audi museum mobile

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 13, 2011
    Cars do have faces... Smile!
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    I admit that I am no car freak. Not at all. Nevertheless I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to the museum mobile, especially the part with the pre-war cars. Those big old carriages like the green one look simply gorgeous!

    The cars are presented with some background about the times they were built and used in. So they can be viewed with some historical interest. We had a guided tour which was excellent.
    The permanent exhibition begins on the top floor with the oldest cars. The second floor shows the deelopment since World War II. The ground floor is used for temporary exhibitions - they had a presentation of car colours at that time, quite fascinating.

    The story of Audi begins in Zwickau when the engineer August Horch founded his company in 1904. "Horch" soon became a renowned brand of luxury cars. After some troubles Horch was kicked out of his own company and founded another. Since the brand name was already taken, he simply translated his name into Latin: Horch ("Listen") became Audi.

    The new museum is part of the Audi Forum in the factory grounds. Seeing the factory requires a different tour, though.

    Click me for a travelogue with more photos

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    Tilly House

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 13, 2011
    Tilly House
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    This house made history in the middle of the 30 Year War. In 1632 Johann t’Serclaes Count of Tilly, the general of the Emperor's army, died here of tetanus on April 30, 15 days after being wounded in the battle of Rain am Lech. In those times the house belonged to the university professor Arnold Roth. An inscription on the facade recalls this houese's "one moment in time".

    Note the relief of the lion on the oriel on the corner. The golden angels are a recent, rather kitschy addition.

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    Hohe Schule, the First University Building

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 11, 2011
    Hohe Schule
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    In 1472 the Duke of Bavaria founded the first university in his state in Ingolstadt. The so-called Hohe Schule (High School) soon became one of the most renowned universities in the German-speaking area, beside Prague and Vienna. Ingolstadt's Hohe Schule was a centre of humanism, catholic theology and counterreformation. In the 19th century the Bavarian state university moved first to Landshut, then to Munich and became the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität. Nowadays Ingolstadt is again a university town with some faculties of the Catholic University Eichstätt-Ingolstadt.

    The building that is still called "Hohe Schule" is, however, older and was originally meant for a different purpose. It was built in the 1430 as a hospital for 15 prebendaries who were to pray for the founder, Duke Ludwig the Bearded. However, his successors decided differently. The building was given to the newly founded university. Later on separate buildings were erected for the different faculties because the Hohe Schule became too small for them all.

    After the university left Ingolstadt the building served as school. Now it hosts again university institutions. Rooms on the ground floor are used by a restaurant. In there, a fresco is preserved with a scene from Greek mythology that referred to the subject of medicine: The famous doctor Asklepios reanimates a young man who had died in an accident with horses and is punished by Zeus for this abuse of his abilities (photo 4).

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    Old Anatomy, Museum of Medical History, and Garden

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 10, 2011
    The Old Anatomy
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    The medical faculty of the university had a new building for teaching, research, and dissections erected in the 1720s and 1730s. The pretty baroque building looks more like a manor or town palace than a place where corpses were cut into pieces. Nowadays it hosts the German Museum of Medical History (Deutsches Medizinhistorisches Museum).

    I have, embarrassingly, admit that even a visit to a modern physician's or dentist's studio scares everything out of me, and imagining how and with what tools the doctors and dentists of former times treated their patients gives me the creeps. So I decided not to visit the museum and I do not regret my decision. In case your nerves are as weak as mine, you'd rather follow my example.

    Anyway, the harmless part is suitable for people with the weakest of nerves: the beautiful apothecary garden behind the anatomy building. Here they grow all kinds of medical herbs and plants that were or still are used in treatments. Walk past the museum entrance and round the corner of the building. The garden is free to visit but donations are appreciated.

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    Maria de Victoria...

    by iaint Updated Jul 25, 2010

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    ...also known as the Asam Church.

    Sorry - no photos. Flash photography is not allowed inside and I didn't know how to eliminate the flash on my new Nikon. Couldn't get a decent angle of the exterior - quite a tall building accessed from a narrow street.

    Built between 1732 & 1736, it is reknowned for two features - the frescoed ceiling by Cosmas Damian Asam (the most famous Bavarian baroque artist), and the most valuable monstrance in the world.

    I'm not sure what the function of a monstrance is (not being Catholic) but it is a large chunk of gold & silver, which I suspect gets waved at the congregation by the priest. I know what ceilings are for.

    Both are impressive.

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    Neues Schloss

    by iaint Updated Jul 18, 2010

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    the main building
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    Construction of the "new castle" was begun in 1418. These days it is the Bavarian Military Museum.

    This is another of the sights I have earmarked to come back to. so on my visit I only saw the exterior.

    Even that is impressive, however, with several large cannons in a large courtyard and a beautiful baroque clocktower at the entrance.

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    Old Town Walk

    by iaint Written Jul 17, 2010

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    Rathausplatz
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    The tourist information office produces a very useful map/brochure with a route for walking around the old town.

    It's not too strenuous, although in my case it was 35c that day and I had just arrived from more "temperate" Scottyland (16c) with no time to acclimatise, so I struggled after a couple of hours. Good excuse to find a beer garden of course!

    How long it takes really depends on whether you go into everything along the way, or just look and move on.

    Address below is for the information office. The tour starts there...

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    The Solar System sans Pluto

    by Vamanosxx Updated Jul 12, 2007

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    Saturn looking toward poor Pluto
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    I can't believe this little gem of a park doesn't show up on the Ingolstadt Old Town Walking Tour map. Everyone I've shown it to loves it.

    It's a scale model of our solar system with each planet portrayed in its relative distance from the sun and in its proportional size. In about 50 meters, you can walk among the planets and the dog poop from the Sun to Pluto.

    Well, not actually Pluto. In a mysterious side note, in early 2006, only about 6 months before the International Astronomical Union declared that Pluto is not a planet, someone stole the tiny replica of Pluto, leaving its granite pedestal as a silent monument to Pluto's sad slip from the pantheon of planets in our solar system.

    Was this the work of vandal lashing out at society after failing grade school science, or that of an astronomer making his point that only objects large enough to be dominant over smaller bodies in their path should be called ‘planets’? In either case, the timing of Pluto’s disappearance is uncanny, don’t you think?

    Check it out, I think it's a highlight of Ingolstadt. (The park, not the missing Pluto pedestal).

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    Shhhhh!! Don't tell anyone - Berlin Wall

    by Vamanosxx Updated Jul 12, 2007

    There's a chunk of the Berlin Wall secreted away where you'd never find it unless you're one of the smokers who hangs around outside the Technikerschule between classes.

    I don't think it's a real piece of the wall, I think it's art. But, I like it.

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    Zip Line!!

    by Vamanosxx Written Jul 6, 2007
    Zip Line - it's not just for kids

    I'd never seen or heard of a zip line until I moved to Germany. I'm told that unlike the US, they're common playground equipment in Europe.

    Ingolstadt's zip line is longer than most I've seen and lots of fun--worth the short walk to get there.

    There's also a nice playground next to the zip line with a trampoline kind of thing that's lame, a basketball hoop (with an uneven gravel court!), a long jump pit (?), swings, a gymnasium kind of contraption and other playground kinds of things. Oh, and two grafitti covered concrete structures that look like satellite dishes. They're about 25m apart and you're supposed to be able to talk quietly into one of the dishes while your partner listening to the other dish can hear you. I've never been able to make it work.

    To find it from the Rathausplatz, walk north on Moritzstr/Am Stein/Harderstr, past Le Cafe, 2 blocks (kind of) and turn left onto Gymnasiumstr at the "Ingobraü" sign. Follow Gymnasiumstr out of the wall, across the wide street to the open grassy field (Hindenburgpark). Take the path to the left and about 50m in front of you is a very cool zip line: hang on and have a blast!. It's about a 10 minute walk from the Rathausplatz.

    This is a nice way to start a walk around Hindenburg Park. Following the trail to the left is best.

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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    The Astronomy Park

    by gordonilla Written May 13, 2007

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    Located at the Adenauer Bridge, on the edge of the old town; the Astronomy Park is one of the most illuminating models of planetary orbits in Germany. It conveys, clearly, the size of our solar system.

    As an aside, Ingolstadt was home to the astronomer Christoph Scheiner:

    He was appointed a Professor at the Hohe Schule, his diwsciplines were Astronomy and Hebrew. His works on astronomy, optics and the human eye enjoyed high acclaim. In March 1611, Scheiner who was a Jesuit, was in the tower of the Heilig- Kreuz Kirche and was one of the first to discover the existence of sunspots.

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    Reduit Tilly ( Tilly Redoubt)

    by gordonilla Written May 9, 2007

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    The Redoubt was constructed as part of the city defences. It is located across the Danube from the Old City and the Neues Schloss. Located within the Klenze Park, the structure is a unique example of German fortification architecture.

    The Reduit Tilly is part of the Bavarian Army Museum and presents the history of The Great War (WWI).

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    Audi Forum Ingolstadt

    by gordonilla Written May 8, 2007

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    The Audi Forum Ingolstadt was opened on 15 December 2000; it is set within the grounds of the AUDI AG corporate headquarters and it does permit you to feel the atmosphere that is generated everywhere. The forum is made up of several buildings - the Information Pavilion, the customer centre, marketing and customer centre, the museum mobile and a series of restaurants.

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    The most famous landmark - the Kreuztor

    by gordonilla Updated May 7, 2007

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    Krueztor

    The Kreuztor is the best preserved gateways and leads into the old town from the west. Four small towers and some limestone decorations embellish the red brick gateway tower.

    It dates from the late 14th century, a romantic witness to medieval architecture. It was once part of the massive second ring of city fortification, and is now regarded as an iconic landmark of the city of Ingolstadt.

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    Asam Church - Maria de Victoria Congregation Hall

    by gordonilla Written May 7, 2007

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    Interior 1
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    Every time I visit Ingolstadt; I am never fail to be impressed by what I see when I sit inside the Asam Church - Maria de Victoria Congregation Hall. There is an impressive and phenomenal ceiling fresco by Cosmas Damian Asam.

    "It is only possible to appreciate the true magnificence of the baroque "Maria de Victoria" Congregation Hall, also known as the "Asam Church", when it is seen from the inside, as it does not have a forecourt or towers and is somewhat hidden away in the old town."

    There are "two exceptionally valuable artistic treasures" which decorate the church which was built between 1732 and 1736. The building was the student oratory for the Marian Student Congregation.

    The first treasure is the ceiling fresco as noted above, painted by Cosmas Damian Asam, he was the most famous Bavarian Baroque artist. The fresco is a "masterly achievement in perspective" - it is the largest flat ceiling fresco in the world of some 42 metres by 16 metres. By the way, to appreciate the perspective aspects of the fresco, you need to go and experience the strange experience of being followed around by an archer and the eyes of an elephant, and the fact that the pyramid of Rameses II looks as if it will collapse apart from one spot in the church.

    The second treasure which was completed in 1708 is a monstrance and it now stands in the treasure chamber. The filigree work of art, set in gold and silver represents the victory of Christians against the Turks in the sea battel of Lepanto. It has been describved as the most valuable monstrance in the world.

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