Munich Shopping

  • Shopping
    by mvtouring
  • Shopping
    by Dizzyhead
  • Christkindl Markt
    Christkindl Markt
    by mindcrime

Most Recent Shopping in Munich

  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    English books galore: Hugendubel :-)

    by Trekki Updated Sep 20, 2013

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    Oh English books...., Hugendubel's store

    Munich being a big city certainly has the advantage to provide more bookstores than the “cultural backwater” town where I live does. The biggest bookstore is Hugendubel with several locations throughout the city. Their biggest store is directly at Marienplatz.

    Whenever I come to Munich I make sure I have room enough in my luggage to bring back a good collection of books I can’t get elsewhere, especially books about Bavaria and more specific Bavarian travel books and maps. In addition, I liked their language section books. I could buy more Italian language books here than anywhere else I have looked.

    When I was visiting Richie and Doreen in September 2010, Richie and I decided to look at the books Hugendubel’s English store has in the shelves. We were both quite amazed to see how big the store was. And Richie could order the beer book he was looking for.
    This bookstore is certainly the one of choice for any foreigner who wants to stock up with books about Bavaria and the region.

    The English bookstore is open Monday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and located at Salvatorplatz. That’s north of Marienplatz, approx. 5-10 minute walk. The website below has a little map with the exact location.

    Directions:
    From Marienplatz, pass the city hall to the left and walk straight ahead (Weinstrasse, then Theresienstrasse) until Salvatorstrasse crosses. Turn left and it is at the next corner (the building with arcades).
    Metro station Odeonsplatz.

    Location of Hugendubel’s English Bookstore on Google Maps.

    © Ingrid D., September 2010 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.)

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    shopping in Munich: shopping in Munich

    by mindcrime Written Feb 6, 2013

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    Christkindl Markt
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    We travelled to Munich in early december so the Christmas Market was already set on Marienplatz. It’s called Christkindl Markt with numerous wooden booths/stalls everywhere around the square but also along the pedestrian street towards Karksplatz. They look nice full in xmas lights and worth to be seen anyway.

    You can buy many xmas related gifts, candles, small figurines, wood carvings but also the usual souvenirs (a bit expensive, 5 euros for a magnet ?!) or just warm hot wine that is served in special xmas cups that you can keep as a sounenir too (you pay 1 euro for deposit). Many people in Munich buy beer steins, although not handy for drinking they look nice for decorations.

    Viktualienmarkt (at Westenriederstrasse) is a good choice to buy food, sausages, cheese, pretzels, wine but as expected the visitors focus on fruits. The market is open Monday to Saturday 10.00-18.00 (Saturday till 15.00). There are also stands with vegetables, flowers, toys, tshirts or other clothes. Lot of people stop for a coffee/light lunch break in the beer garden that is located in the middle.

    By the way in the city center we noticed many stores related to clothing/shoes, also bigger department stores/malls.

    For some strange/funny souvenirs try the store of Deutches museum, some pens that look like needles were good and cheap for many friends back home :) The store is located outside the museum.

    Football fans have to check the stores of FC Bayern Munich, they are all over the city, I guess the most convinient is the one at Hauptbahnhof train station.

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Dallmayr: Delicious goods and snacks

    by Trekki Updated Sep 9, 2012

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    Most naturally, Munich is full with food shops. But there is one which is special and which I highly recommend be it to pick up some snack, to buy food or to find special foodie gifts for special friends. It is Dallmayr, one of the biggest delicatessens in Europe.

    Its long tradition dates back 300 years and it is still a family business. End of 19th century it even received Royal Warrant appointment. Early 20th century the company added coffee to their product palette. This is how I came to know them, or better through an advertisement on TV. When I walked inside the shop, I was amazed to see that they still have these charming ceramic containers on top of the coffee grinders which are shown in that ad. But it also shows the delicious goodies Dallmayr sells in the shop. From snacks to daily food to delicious sweets and coffee, they have everything. Which was also my problem when I was in the shop: the goodies were too tempting so at the end instead of trying and buying everything I left with only a lovely tea in a lovely wrapping for my sister and nothing for me.

    The reason why I like Dallmayr is also because of their social engagement. Nowadays every big giant claims social responsibility and engagement but these are in most of the cases blatant lies. But in the case of Dallmayr I believe their words. They are member of several coffee trading circles, including the Fair Trade organisation, they sponsor Karlheinz Böhm’s ”Menschen für Menschen” (help for people in Ethiopia), Jane Goodall Institute for chimpanzees in Tansania and Rainforest Alliance. And they say that for each pound of sold coffee they contribute five tree seedlings for Ethiopia against the desertification. In May 2012 they terminated contract with coffee supplier Neumann Coffee Group when news surfaced that this one was responsible for brutal eviction of Ugandan farmers.
    Thumbs up for Dallmayr.

    It is easy to find: from Marienplatz, pass the city hall to the right. It is located to the right, the huge yellow building.
    Opening hours:
    Monday – Saturday: 9:30 (a.m.) – 19:00 (7 p.m.)

    Location of Dallmayr’s main shop on Google Maps.

    © Ingrid D., September 2012

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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Munich Christmas Market: November and December

    by grayfo Written Nov 9, 2011

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    �� www.hellomagazine.com

    The main Christmas Market in Munich called "Christkindl Markt" is held on the Marienplatz square in front and around the Altes Rathaus (Old City Hall) where the most traditional stalls can be found with Father Christmas wandering around the stalls between 4pm and 6pm chatting and having his picture taken as a souvenir of an unforgettable visit to the Christmas market.. In all there are over 20 Christmas Markets located throughout the city.

    Annually, usually from around third week in November up to and including Christmas Eve.
    Monday to Friday: 10:00 am to 8:30 pm
    Saturday: 9:00 am to 8:30 pm
    Sunday: 10:00 am to 7:30 pm

    Admission: Free

    November 2011

    What to buy: The market features more than 160 traditionally decorated booths, and is a great place to buy Bavarian wood carvings, traditional toys, glass crystals, crib figurines, bee wax candles, chimney sweeps made of plums and almonds and lots more traditional Christmas gift ideas.

    What to pay: Various

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  • AnnS's Profile Photo

    Riem Arcaden in der Messestadt: Fantastic Shopping Centre

    by AnnS Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Inside the Riem Arcaden
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    The Riem Arcaden is an excellent shopping mall at Munich Messestadt, which is the business/exhibition centre district of Munich. By subway train, it takes about 20 minutes to get there from the city centre.

    There's a huge array of shops, arranged over three floors, and plenty of of places to enjoy a meal, snack, drink or ice cream. There are department stores, a supermarket in the basement and many small shops selling just about everything you could possible need.

    The mall is bright, cheerful and spotlessly clean and is a good place to spend a few hours if the weather's bad.

    What to buy: Everything from clothes to camera accessories to food.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Women's Travel

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  • Shopping Less Ordinary: Shoppingguide for Munich

    by leo1979 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I found in my hotel a very nice shopping map of Munich. It is called Shopping Less Ordinary and it gives some recommendations about nice Fashion stores in Munich. Many of them are in the upcoming Glockenbachviertel and I found some nice things in these shops. My favourites were the fashion designers from Munich who sell there clothes in their own stores.
    The guide has a website with detailed informations about the shops...

    What to buy: I was looking for clothes, but the guide recommends as well Stores for accessories, shoes, design....

    What to pay: I guess the prices are normal. It depends what you are looking for. The international designer brands are expensive everywhere

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Study Abroad
    • Backpacking

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  • TempNomad's Profile Photo

    Viktualienmarkt: Lots to choose from...from honey to woven bags

    by TempNomad Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We saw everything from toys to clothing to flowers to cheeses to bags with logos to honey gummy bears to wines to wursts to plants to plastic thingy things. It's got it all.

    I do suggest you have a lunch here. Loads of great choices (we took the soup kitchen - see my restaurant tips). And if you're planning a picnic or cocktail party, there will be plenty of stocking up to do here. However, it's also very interesting just to walk around and check out the people and stalls. Very colorful, very friendly, very lovely surroundings.

    What to buy: I bought honey bears. There were samples, and I'd never seen them in NYC, so there you go. I was very tempted by some honey wine, but I couldn't decide if I wanted to carry it around all day. There were also great shopping bags. You know, the woven bags with leather handles that a lot of people bring to buy Lebensmittel. I regret not buying one I saw there.

    What to pay: The prices vary. Compare before you buy.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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  • claudia1975's Profile Photo

    IKEA: IKEA - furniture and more ...

    by claudia1975 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Koettbullar

    Ikea is the largest furniture store chain in Europe. Originally coming from Sweden, IKEA has made it to the USA, Japan, China etc. A visit at Ikea can be a family event or nice day if it is rainy outside and you really need something new for your appartment. Munich has two Ikeas – one close to the airport in Eching, the other (brand new) in the south of Munich in Brunnthal. Both Ikeas have a huge collection of affordable furniture, carpets, clothes, towels, dish- and kitchenware, decoration, prints, frames, plants, garden equipment.. etc. A kids area inluding slides, painting area, toy and skilled personnel will give you some time away from the kids to go shopping. The Ikea restaurant is of course only a little better than fast-foot: however, Koetbullar (meat balls) with brown sauce, berry jam and french fries belong to my favourites.

    What to buy: Affordable furniture of all kind (bedroom, kitchens, kids rooms, office furnitue, living rooms, garden furniture etc etc.)
    Plants
    Kitchen equippemnt, dishware
    Bathroom equipment, towels
    Decoration, prints, frames, vases, candles etc.
    Swedish food like salmon paste, bread, chocolate, jam, berry jellies etc.

    What to pay: average and below average prices compared to other furniture stores

    Related to:
    • Work Abroad
    • Women's Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo

    Viktualienmarkt: Fruit, Vegetables and souvenirs

    by oriettaIT Updated Jan 22, 2011
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    Strolling in the center we ended up in this open air market. It was awesome! the vegetables and fruit are nicely piled up to display and there was a huge variety of local and exotic food. In particular we saw a lot of different kind of chili pepper from variuos part of the world. There are also some souvenir stands and some cheese and salami stand.
    In the middle of the market there is a nice caffee where you can enjoy a cup of warm coffee and a delicious piece of cake and just sit and look at all the action around you.
    We really enjoyed stay here.

    What to buy: Try the pretzel, there is a bakery there where you can also look at the woman making those.

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  • ellyse's Profile Photo

    Souvenir Shopping at Munich Airport

    by ellyse Written Apr 1, 2010

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    Say hi to the lamb! :)
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    The duty-free shop was reasonably good in its selection of perfumes, alcohol and also European and German souvenirs such as beer, sausages, chocolate etc. Since it was a couple of weeks before Easter, there were pretty Easter-themed chocolate souvenirs on sale when I went. I can't be sure, but they might look better than they taste. ;)
    Souvenirs, snacks, drinks, magazines and books can also be found at the convenience stores. I finally found my postcards here, and the friendly staff will also sell stamps. If you want to post the postcards, one of the staff kindly offered to help me with that (just give the postcards to her after you're done writing them) and the postcards reached me fine.

    What to pay: Figure on about 1.5-3 EUR for a postcard, and 1 EUR for postage.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Frey -Wille: Upscale Gold and Enamel Jewelry

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 17, 2007

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    A Viennese designer and purveyor of expensive hand made jewelry, Frey Wille is always a stop on our European trips. Little known in the US where it has only one store in California, sales outlets are present in many major European cities as well as in the Far East. The beautiful offerings include rings, small pieces, and lovely bracelets. Enamel ( a mixture of finely ground glass with metal additives) is applied to a metal base in four layers, then 24 ct. gold powder is applied by hand. The enamel is then hand-colored and the pieces are repeatedly fired until the gold and the colors fuse. The final work is set in a 24 ct gold finished brass base. The results in real life as just as striking as the store window images, one of which is included here from Munich.

    The inspiration for each set of jewelry is drawn from a wide range -- modern life, ancient Greece and Rome, and the works of famous artists including Monet, Klimt, Mucha, and others.

    The company was founded by Michaela Frey, a Viennese artist, in 1951. Accountant Friedrich Wille joined in the 1970's, drawn by his interest in art and culture. Following the death of the founder in 1980 a new design team was created led by Wille's wife Simone. To this time, most of the work emphasized folklore and geometric designs. With a new team working, the pattern choices broadened to the wide range available today. Because of the hand made nature, sales are through approximately 45 company owned outlets including some in major department stores.

    What to buy: These pieces are striking, draw constant favorable comments from envious friends, but are not cheap. The average bracelet exceeds Eu500 although there are occasional significant 30% off sales.

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  • Max Krug: High quality Bavarian souvenirs

    by meadwaytourer Updated Jul 15, 2007

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    What to buy: Exceptional quality, hand carved wooden cuckoo clocks, music boxes, nutcracker figurines etc. Plus a range of hand painted beer steins.

    What to pay: Max Krug is not cheap. Cuckoo clocks and music boxes start from £80 to £100. Nutcrakers and steins are from £20 to £30.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Cobrahunter's Profile Photo

    Stierblut: Coolest Fashion Place

    by Cobrahunter Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    Real cool selection of the avantgarde in fashion. Real authentic people with an excellent taste and a non-conventionell atmosphere. A must for all victims..

    What to pay: Middle to upper scale, less than in other high-end brand stores.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Luxury Travel
    • Gay and Lesbian

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Bauer & Hieber: All about music

    by Nemorino Updated Oct 16, 2006

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    1. Old photo of Musik Hieber
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    This is one of several fine music stores in downtown Munich. They have a good selection of books, sheet music and instruments.

    Second photo (update): It's now called Bauer & Hieber, but otherwise looks very much the same. (Klingt gut means "sounds good".)

    Related to:
    • Music

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Ludwig Beck’s: Opera and classical music CDs

    by Nemorino Updated Oct 16, 2006

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    1. CDs at Ludwig Beck's
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    The CD department on the top floor of Ludwig Beck's department store is the best place I know of in Germany to buy opera and classical music CDs.

    This last time I was looking for a particular recording of Arrigo Boito’s opera Mefistofele, a Sony recording from 1988 with Samuel Ramey, Placido Domingo, Eva Marton, and the Hungarian State Orchestra conducted by Giuseppe Patané. Of course I could have ordered it in Frankfurt and had it in a couple days, but I thought since I was going to Munich anyway I would just go up to Beck's and see if they had it in stock, and sure enough, there it was.

    Second photo: Ludwig Beck's department store as seen from the steeple of St. Peter's church.

    Related to:
    • Music

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