Alte Pinakothek, Munich

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    by Roadquill
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    Lion Hunt (Rubens, 1621)
    by mindcrime
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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Alte Pinakothek

    by acemj Updated Aug 20, 2004

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    The Alte Pinakothek (Old Picture Gallery) has an amazing collection of paintings highlighted by one of the world's greatest collections of German, Flemish, Dutch and even Italian artists. I spent a good two hours walking around the beautiful building, which was commissioned by King Ludwig I and built between 1826 and 1836.

    Some of the most memorable paintings were Albrecht Durer's "Self Portrait" that I remember studying in school. The painter who considered himself almost divine depicts himself in an almost Christ-like fashion. I also really liked Albrecht Altdorfer's amazing and complex painting "The Battle of Alexander." There is SO much to look at in this work and the details are staggering.

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    Superb Museum of Old Masters

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 20, 2007

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    The Alte Pinakothek is one of three museums in Munich's Kunstareal or Art Area, the others the New and Modern Museums covering 19th Century and Modern Art respectively. The largest number of paintings derive from the collections of the Wittelsbach dynasty, avid art collectors dating back to the 16th Century. King Ludwig I (1825-48 commissioned the building of this two story museum to consolidate the Wittelsbach holdings and specifically to house the massive Judgement Day by Rubens. Built between 1826-36, it was heavily damaged in WWII, it was opened in the 1950's.

    The schools represented include German, Dutch, Flemish, Italian, French, and Spanish painters from the 13th thru 18th Centuries. The list of masters represented reads like an All-Star team of the greatest artists in history, hardly worth repeating here. The Rubens collection is the largest in Europe, dominated by the Last Judgement, one of the largest oils ever painted. Paintings of both his wives are included as well. The Annunciation, one of the most fertile legends for Italian painters (I love Annunciations), is represented by a lovely Fra Fillipo Lippi and there are several works by Beato Angelico including the Entombment of Christ. Albrecht Durer"s self portrait and his remarkable Four Apostles are displayed - the latter is of special interest. Rather than idealizing the Apostles, they look like four guys you might be seated near at a local pub, a remarkable painting. There are over 800 paintings on display. 2047 characters do not allow space to detail all the great works of art here - enough to say we had to be thrown out at closing time after three enthralling hours.

    The Alte Pinakothek is a world class museum. We found it nearly deserted even on a Sunday afternoon when admission is only 1 Eu. The audio guide ( free during the week when admission is 5.5 Eu but 4 Eu on Sunday PM) is comprehensive and indispensable -highly recommended. If you have any interest in great sacred, mythologic, and master art, DO NOT MISS THIS MUSEUM.

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    Alte Pinakothek

    by Nemorino Updated May 29, 2013

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    1. Paintings by Federico Barocci (1526-1612)
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    This is an important and exciting collection of over 800 European paintings from the 14th to 18th centuries. German, Flemish, Dutch, Italian, French and Spanish paintings are all well represented.

    In my first photo, the painting on the right is Christ and Magdalena, from the year 1590, by the Italian (Umbrian) painter Federico Barocci (1526-1612).

    Second photo: The extensive collection of 17th century Flemish paintings includes two rooms devoted to the works of Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640). The one on the right in my second photo is his Martyrdom of St. Laurentius.

    Third photo: Another Rubens painting is this one of the condemned descending into hell: The Fall of the Damned from 1620/21. This is his interpretation of the words of the Judge of the World according to St. Matthew's Gospel (25, 41): "Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels."

    Fourth photo: This painting by the Spanish painter Bartolomé Estéban Murillo (1618-1682) is a good illustration of what nit-picking is, in case you have ever used this expression (meaning the habit of paying too much attention to small and unimportant details) without stopping to think of its origin. A nit is the egg of an insect, usually a louse, that is sometimes found in people's hair, and the woman in the painting is doing what all parents have done at one time or another, namely searching her child's hair for these tiny white dots. (Famous last words: "It could never happen to my child." Ha, ha.)

    Fifth photo: The painting in the center is the Death of Celopatra by the German Baroque painter Johann Liss (1597-1631). Liss was quite a traveler, by the way. Between 1614 and 1619 he was in Haarlem, Amsterdam and Antwerp, and after that he traveled via Paris to Venice. From 1622 he was in Rome, and at the end of the 1620s he returned to Venice, where he died of the plague in 1631.

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    Alte Pinakothek

    by dcwizard Written Feb 25, 2004

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    Facade of the Alte Pinakothek

    The Alte Pinakothek houses mostly European paintings from the 14th to 18th Centuries. The older works are not my cup of tea, but it holds a rather substantial selection. The original building was built in 1836, and was the second museum commissioned by Ludwig I, outside what used to be Munich's city walls. The museum was renovated in 1957 to repair WWII air raid damage. Take advantage of free Sunday admission!

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    Alte Pinakothek

    by mindcrime Updated Feb 6, 2013

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    Lion Hunt (Rubens, 1621)
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    The museum quarter in Munich houses 3 different painting galleries: Old Pinakothek (13th to-18th century), New Pinakothek(19th century) and Modern(20th century). All of them worth to be visited but due to limited time we choosed one to see it properly. If you plan to visit more than one buy the day pass to save some euros.

    Alte Pinakothek (Old Picture Gallery) is really old, dates back from 1826 when it was erected to house Last Judgment (Rubens 1617), a huge painting that you can still enjoy here (hopefully there weren’t many visitors around so we had all the time we needed to check it from distance but also go closer for the details. The collection is really rich with about 800 european paintings from 14th to 18th century, some of them are world’s master pieces but still you have to choose or read your homework before you visit the museum so to focus on specific pieces and maximize the pleasure.

    First we visited the Flemish section (16-18th century) where you can see a huge collections of the baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens(1577-1640), apart from the large one that I mentioned we focused on the rape of the daughters of Leucippus (1617) a masterpiece for sure, I would visit this museum just for this anyway! Rubens made a lot of history paintings but also portraits, landscapes and some animal/mythological paintings, Lion Hunt is also one that worth to be seen. Among the other painters don’t miss The Land of Cockaigne (1567), a funny comment on sloth and gluttony by the renaissance painter Pieter Brueghel(1525-1569)

    Then we checked some German paintings, the Battle of Alexander at Issus is a masterpiece of Albrecht Altdorfer (1529), Altdorfer is famous as founder of western landscape art. We also saw paintings by Albrecht Durer(1471-1528), we loved his self-portrait and late gothic painter Stefan Lochner(1400-1452)

    From early Netherlandish and dutch section(15-18th century), you can see paintings of D.Bouts, F.Hals, P.Lastman, R.Weyden, C.Fabritius, G.Terborch and many others. There’s a small piece of Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516) called Fragment from the Last Judgment, everything that came out of his weird fantasy is a must but of course his masterpiece (the garden of earthly delights) is in Prado, Madrid.

    Italian paintings (13-18th century) take big part of the museum with works by Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli and many others but we didn’t have time and skipped this section.

    Finally we checked the Spanish section of the pinakothek, Velazquez and El Greco are some famous ones but what we loved most were the paintings of the baroque painter Bartolome Esteban Murillo (1617-1682), although his famous for some religious painting I love the ones that focus on daily scenes, poor children, beggars, street girls etc Children Playing Dice and Beggar boys eating Grapes and Melon are amazing paintings.

    Pic 1 Lion Hunt (Rubens, 1621)
    Pic 2 side wall of Alte Pinakothek
    Pic 3 Children playing dice (Bartolome Esteban Murillo, 1665-1675)
    Pic 4 The Sacrifice of Isaac (Rembrandt, 1636)
    Pic 5 The rape of the daughters of Leucippus (Rubens, 1617)

    It’s open Tuesday to Sunday 10.00-18.00 (Tuesdays till 20.00)
    The entrance fee is 7 Euro(Sundays 1euro only) or you can buy the day pass (12 euros) that include the 3 pinakothek museums, museum Brandhorst, and Sammlung Schack

    The audio guide was useful if you want to know more about artworks that you are not familiar with, unfortunately they didn’t include all the paintings.

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  • arlequin_g's Profile Photo

    Alte Pinakothek

    by arlequin_g Updated May 1, 2003

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    This big museum has nothing to envy to other great museums like Le Louvre, The Metropolitan...
    Enjoy the magnificient works by the great old painters. You can find important works by Bruegel, Durero, van Dyck, Rubens (the best collection of Rubens in the world), and much more. Some rooms have enormous paintings. Take it easy, there are hundreds of works. It's 5 euros.

    Open daily, except Mondays, 10-17
    Tuesday and Thursday 10-20

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    The Alte Pinakotheke

    by paoseo Written Apr 20, 2006

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    Rubens
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    The timetable of the Museum is :
    Daily except MON 10.00 - 17.00
    TUE 10.00 - 20.00
    Closed: Mondays, Shrove Tuesday, May 1st, Christmas Eve (24.12.), Boxing Day (25.12.), New Year's Eve (31.12.)
    Ticket's price:
    Regular Admission: 5,50 Euro | Concessions 4 Euro
    Including Audio-Guide
    Sunday admission 1 Euro
    Audio-Guide on Sundays 4 Euro

    The Audio Guide is quite helpful and it's free, so it's a good thing.

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  • Landotravel's Profile Photo

    Magnificent old paintings museum

    by Landotravel Updated Sep 23, 2010

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    Twin coloured facade
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    Since its opening by time of Ludwig I, this building off Neue Pinakothek is the main old painting museum here. As in the other building, the collection inside is superb too. Here you find galleries devoted to flemish, french, german, dutch, spanish or italian paintings since XIIIth century to XVIII. The Renaissance and dutch collections are fantastic. There are paintings by Durer, Rubens, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Giotto, Holbein, Cranach, Fra Angelico, Lippi, Leonardo Da Vinci, Botticelli, Perugino, Ghirlandaio, Raphael, Tintoretto, Vasari, Halst, Boucher, Brueghel, Velazquez, Murillo, etc. etc.

    A curious thing to see is the facade of this building, for it shows better than others the scars of war. The facade shows two different tones, two different construction materials: the older zones are stoned but others are made of brick which contrast and gives an idea of the original devastation provoked by bombing in WWII. Simply astounding.

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    Oldie but a goodie

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 20, 2007

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    Even the building is impressive

    Alte Pinakothek is yet another of the classic European art galleries. Me, I can't get enough of them though I have to admit that after about two hours I tend to get physically tired.
    The design of this gallery, by Leo von Klenze in 1836, is of such significance that many other European galleries have copied its layout.
    Centre piece of the museum is the prolific Rubens and here you'll find one of the largest collections of his works. At the top of the list of Italian painters is Titian and there are many Dutch artists on show, not the least of which is Frans Hals.
    The German artist Durer has some of his finest on display here such as his "Four Apostles" and his self-portrait (1500).
    The spacious layout and excellent lighting make this a must-see stop on your Munich trip.
    I took advantage of the late opening hours on Tuesday (open till 8 p.m.) and arrived in the chill air of the early evening with intermittent drizzle prevailing. This, however, failed to dampen my spirits once inside and viewing the quality of works on display.

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Loads of beautiful paintings!

    by Roeffie Updated Jun 16, 2005

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    Alte Pinakothek

    Alte Pinakothek is one of the most famous museums of art in the world.

    Leo von Klenze started building the museum in 1826 and ten years later it was ready to accomodate the many paintings.

    If you love paintings simply a must do! I am not a big fan, but liked it anyway!

    Admission:
    Adults: € 5,00

    Opening Hours
    10:00-17:00 Tue-Sun;
    10:00-20:00 Tue & Thu;

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Visit the Collections (1)

    by hquittner Updated Aug 2, 2008

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    Grunewald-Mocking of Christ
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    The Galleries are one of the top dozen Art Museums in the world. As befits a Great Bavarian Museum, it houses the largest collection of the works of a great native: Albrecht Durer (1471-1528), arguably the equal of the greatest talents of his period in Europe. (See our Associated Tip on him and his works). Coincidentally it also has the largest collection of paintings by Peter Paul Rubens (see our Tip on him too). Centering on the year 1500 the Germanies had a host of adept painters at work and the Pinakothek has a fine collection of their works. They are not as richly represented elsewhere and this is an opportunity to see them alongside contemporaries from nearby Flanders and Holland. We illustrate 4 of them here.

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    Götterdämmerung!

    by Wildono Written Apr 1, 2007

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    The Alte Pinokothek is nothing less than an excellent, easily navigated museum. Albrecht Dürer's work, including his self-portrait, was rather impressive. The majority of works on exhibit in October of 2002 contemplated the Final Judgment. My favorite painting was Pieter Bruegel the Elder's "Land of Cockayne", with the clergyman, merchant and boatman sprawled in the grass amidst a living feast begotten through serious consumption of medicinal powders. Several of Hieronymus Bosch's surrealistic paintings presented their difficult to imagine hellish figures - doubtless generating a sense of dread among Early Renaissance art afficionados; still inspiring contemporary film representations of horrific beasts and demons.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Alte Pinakothek

    by Sjalen Updated Nov 12, 2004

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    The first thing that strikes you when you approach this huge museum is that the facade bricks have different colours. This is because the house was bombed during WWII and when rebuilt, it was decided that everything that was repaired should be shown in a different colour to the old bricks. This gives a very good overview of how extensive the damage really was!

    Inside, you will find paintings from the 14th to the 18th century. Much of it is German, but also from the rest of Europe. Albrecht Dürer's self portrait is one of the most famous, along with paintings by Memling and the Breughels. Best known however, is maybe the Rubens collection.

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  • CliffClaven's Profile Photo

    Alte Pinakothek

    by CliffClaven Written Aug 24, 2002

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    As one of Europe's finest galleries, the Alte Pinakothek is definitely worth a visit. You'll find 800 paintings here by some of the greatest names in the history of European art. The photo here shows the self-portrait by Dürer.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Alte Pinotek

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 26, 2012
    View of the building outside
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    This is the museum that features art works/paintings from 1500-1700's. There are many famous painter works featured inside, with Rubens, Raphael, Brueghel, and Cranach being a few coming to mind.
    The artpieces were a collection of many rulers/kings/Dukes of the times. It started with Wilhelm IV in the 1500's and continued through the ages as the collection grew from a variety of purchases and conscript works. Because of the period, about 3/4 of the works of art relate to religion and scenery.
    It is open 10-6 daily except for Monday when closed. Admission is 7 Euro

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