Dachau - Concentration Camp, Munich

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    Crematorium
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  • Puckfair's Profile Photo

    Dachau

    by Puckfair Written Jan 7, 2008

    This is a sombre experience,
    u have to go just to see how or try and understand what the suffering was for the people forced to go here

    the museum is laid out very well- it is long ensure u bring some drinkor something to eat as there is no place near by to buy food unless u go to where the main station is dachau

    u pay something minimum for the audio guide which is very comprehensive

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    A visit to Dachau

    by azz8206 Written Dec 4, 2007

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    Work makes you free
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    I highly recommend touring Dachau with a walking tour guide, especially because of how knowledgable they are. My tour guide was a English fellow named Geoffrey. If I recollect the tour company is called Munich walks and it meets in front of the clock at the marienplatz in the morning. If I remember correctly the price is 18 euros per person and that covers the train ride over there and back. Also there isn't a charge to get into the camp. The tour takes approxiametely 4 hrs if not a little more

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    Dachau Concentration Camp

    by culgharper Written Sep 9, 2007

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    Entrance to Dachau Concentration Camp
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    After checking in our hotel following our 14 hour flight, we took the subway S-Bahn to Dachau Concentration Camp. This was the only place we went where we got lost though it could have been because we had been up for many hours and we were tired . The directions we were given got us in the general area but not to the Camp and we had to walk quite a bit and eventually caught a bus, which fortunately are everywhere. I was quite surprised to find it in the middle of town, somehow i expected it to be out in the middle of nowhere. Dachau is one of the earliest concentration camps set up in Germany in 1933. The camp is surrounded by barbed wire and there are still guard towers standing. Everyone should see it. It was cold, eerie and the museum was very sad. You could spend a lot of time there looking at photos and reading. The only tip I have is to get good directions on this one....it was hard to find.

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  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Never Forget.

    by MLW20 Written Apr 30, 2007

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    A visit to Dachau is a must on a trip to Munich. Dachau was the first Nazi concentration camp. You can learn a lot about how people were treated and forced to live/try to survive in a concentration camp.

    The camp consists of a museum, bunker, restored barracks, crematorium and memorial shrines to the various ethnic/religious groups sent here. A video is also shown in the museum's theater about what it was like during the Nazi regime.

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  • Wildono's Profile Photo

    An accessible day trip into the human condition

    by Wildono Written Apr 1, 2007

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    Let's be honest with ourselves. Travel is largely about field sociology, and increasing our self-awareness. In these efforts, sometimes a trip to the darker side of human nature is called for. And Las Vegas is not the answer to every one of these callings. Group behavior and "group think" has become ever more powerful a feature of the Age of Communication - TV, radio, the Internet, etc. However, until more is known about Gitmo, some thirty years from now if and when documents are declassified, you can learn more about the nature of humans to define themselves by defining other humans at the Concentration Camp in Dachau, Germany. Plan for four hours of total time in transit and touring.

    KZ Dachau is more accessible to public transit than ever before, with frequent S2 train service between Dachau and München, and more frequent bus service from the Dachau Bahnhof now direct to the KZ visitor center.

    Given the numerous changes over the years, mostly to the detriment of historical integrity, recent renovations to the KZ itself have made for more display space for archived official records, detention facilities and items confiscated from those persecuted by the Nazis.

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  • SailorRoar's Profile Photo

    The dark history of the Nazis

    by SailorRoar Updated Dec 7, 2006

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    The enterance to the camp

    The camp has been turned into a memorial site, most of the barracks have been teared down, but two is still standing for the tourists to take a look. Behind them the concrete base for the rest of the barracs stands as a memory of how many prisoners was once here. In addition there is a museum, several memorial contructions for different religions and ethnical groups, and just outside the camp itself, it the execution spot, gas chamber and krematorium.

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    Dachau concentration camp

    by vichatherly Updated Jul 12, 2006

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    Dachau, Arbeit Macht Frei Gate
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    A visit to Dachau concentration camp.

    This doesn't sound the most cheerful of "sightseeing" trips but it is well worth the effort. Go to make sure that we never forget and that it never happens again.

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  • Sobering enlightenment

    by CDNgirl Updated Mar 22, 2006

    Visit the Dachau concentration camp. It's a sobering, but very necissary trip and reminder of the past, so that we cannot repeat it.
    It was a powerful dose of reality for those of us who only read about World War II in school textbooks and did not have to feel the effects of it. I did not live through fallout or have close family to really make it personal. It made the holocaust very real for me, and yes, it's not exactly the happiest place on earth, but I don't think our trip would have been complete without that stop.

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    Dachau Concentration Camp

    by antistar Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Another aspect of the sadder side of Munich's history is the Dachau Concentration Camp, the first of its kind in Germany and a template for the camps that sprouted up all over Nazi Europe during their reign. It wasn't a death camp, however, although thousands of people died there as a result of their internment. It also wasn't a camp designed specifically to hold Jewish prisoners, although plenty of Jewish people passed through its infamous gate, inscribed with the words that have passed down through history: "Arbeit Macht Frei" (Freedom through Labour).

    The Dachau prison camp was home to an eclectic bunch of prisoners from all over Europe. There were, among others, Polish priests, Austrian politicians, German resistance fighters, Ukrainian writers and Greek communists. Many thousands did not survive the experience, and their bodies were disposed of in the notorious cremation ovens. The original crematorium proved inadequate for the job, and so a larger more productive version was built to burn the bodies like an assembly line.

    A visit to Dachau isn't fun, and can be distressing at times, but is still very rewarding and informative. The excellent museum provides an encompassing view of life in the camp, through the stories of the victims, the kind of conditions they had to suffer, letters they wrote home, and many other gripping articles of the camp's history. Less than an hour wouldn't do the museum justice. It is a haunting experience, though, and my friend Luciano (of Jewish ancestry) couldn't bring himself to visit.

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    Very Moving!

    by criss1956 Written Oct 28, 2005

    I visited Dachau only once. It was very moving. I only recently found out that my Uncle, Marion Hill was in the group of Soldiers who liberated Dachau. He was stationed there for several months or so afterwards, guarding the SS soldiers, then he went to OCS.

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  • Jasoninlondon's Profile Photo

    Dachau Bunks

    by Jasoninlondon Written Mar 17, 2005
    Bunks

    This is a reconstruction of how the prisoners how to sleep during their stay at the camp. Most of the time more than one person would share each of this little sections. Many of the prisoners had diseases so they could spread quickly with everyone sleeping so close together.

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    Dachau Bunks

    by Jasoninlondon Written Mar 17, 2005
    Bunks

    This is a reconstruction of how the prisoners how to sleep during their stay at the camp. Most of the time more than one person would share each of this little sections. Many of the prisoners had diseases so they could spread quickly with everyone sleeping so close together.

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  • Etoile2B's Profile Photo

    Dachau

    by Etoile2B Updated Mar 2, 2005
    Dachau

    Dachau is Munich’s reminder of the atrocities of WWII. This concentration camp has been turned into a museum so we can all learn from our past. Most of the exhibits are in German, but it’s an important experience. The grounds have been manicured so it’s more antiseptic than some of the other camps open to the public today, but a visit here is no less sobering and influential. Dachau is located outside the Munich city limits but is easy to get to by train. I recommend taking at least an afternoon to come and pay your respects to those who experienced the horrors of ethnic cleansing and hopefully learn a little something so this never happens again. Without history we can never learn from our mistakes and make changes for our future.

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    Arbeit macht frei (work makes free)

    by heitzenrater Written Jan 15, 2005

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    Arbeit macht frei (work makes free)
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    Dachau was a concentration camp of the Third Reich from 1933-1945. The camp office files showed a total of more than 206,000 prisoners registered in those years, though many prisoners were taken to Dachau without being registered. About 31,000 deaths of prisoners and 6,000 deaths of Russian soldiers were recorded but the number is believed to be much higher. It is difficult to explain the emotions that run through you as you are standing in the middle of the roll call yard.

    The Wirtschaftsgebaude contained the kitchen, the laundry, storage rooms for prisoners' clothing and personal belongings, and the notorious shower baths where the SS would torture prisoners by flogging and hanging then at the stake. In front is a memorial sculpture depicting bodies in the shape of barbed wire. The Wirtschaftsgebaude is now a museum.

    The Jourhaus was the only entrance to the camp. "Arbeit Macht Frei" ("Work Makes One Free") was the slogan the prisoners saw on the gates as they arrived. The building housed the SS guard rooms and the camp administration offices

    One of the barracks was rebuilt according to original specifications. Originally, it was meant to house 208 prisoners but toward the end, about 1600 prisoners lived in one of the barracks.

    The Krematorium was built in 1942. A gas chamber was also installed at Dachau but never used. The prisoners selected for gassing were transported to other concentration camps.

    This statue stands outside of the Krematorium. It is a memorial to those who died at Dachau and also a warning to future generations. I find it ironic that we were visiting Dachau as the atrocities in Kosovo were being revealed. It seems that mankind sure hasn't learned much.

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  • Dachau Concentration Camp

    by C_Nacke Written Dec 1, 2004

    This is something that absolutely cannot be missed. Every single person should visit one of the camps. Just the size alone stunned me, and Dachau was a smaller camp.

    We all learn about the Holocaust, but there is no comparison between a classroom or textbook and the actual camp. To see a picture in a book of a slaughtered prisoner, and then to look up from that book to the actual spot where that photo was taken is chilling.

    When I went, I didn't speak more than a sentence or two for hours on end, even after I left. This is a place that will change you forever. It stirs something inside you.

    When walking into the camp, it's as if an enormous blanket of silence falls over the world. All you hear is a faint breeze, and your own feet crunching the rock under foot. The size, as I mentioned before, is incredible.

    After walking around the courtyard and the barracks area, I was almost too exhausted to cross the small stream and head towards the crematorium and ash graves. When walking in, many people miss the old crematorium, but it's worth the stop. I stood there by myself for a few moments, then dropped to my knees in prayer. After, I went to Barrack X, the new crematorium. Then proceeded on to the graves. This area is impossible to describe.

    Be sure to read everything you can see, as some atrocious act was likely committed right where you stand.

    Everyone should visit a camp, Dachau, I'm told, is one of the most interesting as it is the first.

    Don't ever forget

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Comments (1)

  • SherieS's Profile Photo
    Feb 1, 2014 at 8:11 PM

    i was 7 yrs old and my family visited Dachau at that tim in the early seventies it was still as it was during the war. although many have stated it wrong that our parents took us at such a young age, i have never forgotten it. we toured the entire faclity the gas chambers still stood and the bunkers and barracks. it was something i am greatful i was able to do. During history classes i was able to take pictures, brochures and my own memoreis. i think this has also helped me to be more tolerent and understanding in my life. we are all human and should be treated that way no matter of race or relegion. i thank my dad and mom for this lesson!!

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