Deutsches Museum, Munich

4.5 out of 5 stars 43 Reviews

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Up in the air (almost)

    by iandsmith Written Jul 19, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Is that the Red Baron I spy?
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    The museum is every mechanical minded person dream, no area more so than the aircraft area, but the last pic here holds the most poignant story.
    The Wagner family, five strong with three children aged 17,16 and 6 at the time, built this backyard aircraft and were preparing to fly it out of East Germany in 1981.
    Sadly, the day before they were due to leave they were arrested, charged and convicted of "Blatant preparation of a border crossing".
    During the court hearing the authorities attested to the airworthiness of the vehicle and the original intention had been to do a solo flight first from the Nonnewitz open cut coal mine near Leipzig before returning for the family.
    Though they received jail sentences the Austrian government made overtones and the family were allowed to leave for West Germany after serving a year in prison.
    The longest piece used in construction is only 4 metres long thus allowing it to be transported by road. The East German Ministry for National Security impounded it for their "Traditional Cabinet" in 1981 and, in 1990, it was shown as part of an exhibition of escape vehicles in the museum for "Deutsche Geschichte" in Berlin before being returned to its owner.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    It's a biggie

    by iandsmith Written Jul 18, 2007

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    From the other side of the river
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    This is a museum in many parts. The largest of which is on the Museum Island. One of the world's largest science and technology museums, it promises much but delivers more.
    Do you want to see airplanes, submarines, the first X-ray machine? Live demonstrations and hands-on instructional aids are fun and informative for the visitor. The Deutsches Museum has everything, from a coal mine to the stars! But to see it all, you'll have to walk 16 kilometres.
    The first thing you will probably come across is the maritime section, though you could be excused when seeing the picture 2 that you have just come across some Aussies after a late night in a beer hall.
    There are models of ships (pic 5), full blown models of engines (pic 4) and even ships themselves (pic 3); the latter being of a size no longer needed in the modern world.
    A new branch of the Deutsches Museum, the "Flugwerft Schleissheim" - a reconstructed airplane factory - has opened in Oberschleissheim.

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  • The world's largest museum of science & technology

    by meadwaytourer Updated Jul 14, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Enigma machine on display in the computing section

    A trip to Munich is incomplete without a visit to the magnificent Deutsches museum.

    This massive sprawling collection of scientific and technological exhibits is housed in a wonderful old building on the eastern bank of the River Isar close to the Isartor gate.

    Amongst the themes covered in the seperate halls are aeronautics and space, materials, metallurgy, electronics and computing, telecommunications, chronometry, construction, astronomy, physics, chemistry and mathematics. There is also an observatory and planetarium. All in all, it is a marvellous celebration of science, engineering and technology.

    One of the most notable exhibits is the entire mining department, where you are taken underneath the museum into a series of specially constructed mineshafts. These show the history of how man has extracted minerals and deposits over the centuries and it gives you a real idea of just how dangerous mining was in the early days.

    I was also impressed by the aeronautics and space halls and the section on the development of electronics (covering early analogue through to digital and modern computing).

    You could probably spend two or three days in the museum but we manged to cover all the areas of interest in around three hours. The cost of entry was € 8.50 per person and € 3 for children/concessions

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  • Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleissheim

    by meadwaytourer Written Jul 12, 2007

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    The experimental X-31 at Flugwerft Schleissheim
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    If the aerospace hall at the Deutsches Museum leaves you wanting to see more flying machines, the good news is that the museum owns an even larger collection of aircraft which are exhibited at the Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleissheim.

    Flugwerft Schleissheim is a collection of old and new buildings on a historical airfied just north of Munich city. Like most of the attractions in Munich, a visit is made easy by the fantastically efficient public transport system. From the centre of the city you can take the trip up to Schleisheim after breakfast, spend a couple of hours looking at the exhibits and be back in town for lunch.

    Amongst the exhibits are an early Eurofighter test bed, the unique MBB-Rockwell X-31 vectored-thrust test plane, an F-4 Phantom, F-104 Starfighter and many others from earlier ages of flight. My favourite (because it is the only chance you will ever get to see one) was the lovingly restored experimental Dornier DO-31 - a German attempt to develop a civilian application for Harrier VTOL technology. The DO-31 has two outboard Rolls-Royce Pegasus engines as developed for the Harrier but was built to deliver freight rather than high explosives!

    The Schleissheim airfield in itself also has a fascinating history - told in detail for visitors - particularly the part it played in the aftermath of WWII. On top of that, the imposing and very grand palace of Schloss Schleissheim is a five minute walk from the museum. You should take the opportunity of at least a brief walk around the magnificent gardens on your way back to the station.

    Entry is five Euros per person - cheap at twice the price!

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by Sjalen Updated Jun 14, 2007

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    I haven't got enough superlatives for this museum. It has simply ended up as one of this family's favourite museums ever - we went there on the only really rainy day we had, as our book made it sound good for a 6-year-old as well as her parents. That's just it - this place appeals to you whatever your age, gender and interest! Set up as a Science and Technology Museum, you might think it sounds dull, but this shows things in a very educational way (also in English) so that everyone can understand. It makes everything technical around you interesting and fun (and interactive here and there), whether it is a V2 rocket or a clarinett. Apart from aircraft and musical instruments, the museum has things on space travel, shipping, trains, cars, medicin, bridges, tunnels, electricity, environment, food manufacturing, IT history, mapping...it is huge! This means that whatever your interest, you will find something appealing - we found so much it took us six hours in there, and then we only really left as the restaurants were packed (due to the weather it was crowded) and our feet too sore to walk more! But not before seeing the museum showpiece: a mine. I am not with you kidding when I say that the entire cellars has been turned into mines. Just when you think the old part with pit ponies was it, along comes another flight of stairs into a modern mine with huge machinery! Mind blowing place. You can also climb its tower for a city view.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 21, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Deutsches Museum
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    This is one of the world's largest technology museums. They have four dozen permanent exhibits, for instance on Railways, Computers, Weights and Measures, Astronomy, Carriages and Bicycles. They say the permanent exhibits alone cover a floor area of 55.000 square meters, so don't go there expecting to see it all.

    What I am planning to see next time is the Computer exhibit, which includes the historical Z3 and Z4 machines by Konrad Zuse (1910-1995).

    The Z3 was competed in 1941, and they say it "is considered to be the very first freely programmable, fully automatic calculating device." It was destroyed during the war, but the museum has a full-scale functioning replica that was authorized by Zuse himself.

    The Z4 is absolutely original, though, since Zuse saved it from wartime destruction by smuggling it out to Switzerland in 1944. It was finished in 1945 and was used for calculations between 1950 and 1959. At times it was the only functioning computer in Europe.

    (There is a replica of Zuse's first machine, the Z1, at the German Technical Museum in Berlin. Also there is a functioning Z22, with 415 vacuum tubes, at the Center for Art and Media (ZKM) in Karlsruhe. For more information on Konrad Zuse, please have a look at my Bad Hersfeld intro page.)

    The museum is open daily from 9 am to 5 pm, except on certain holidays.

    Admission is EUR 8.50 for adults, or EUR 5.00 if you get concession, for instance if you can prove that you are unemployed, retired or handicapped, or have a Munich Welcome Card. Students and children pay only EUR 3.00.

    They also have a planetarium. I've never been there, but I have just learned that it is the only planetarium outside of North America which offers discounts to members of the Planetary Society. So don't forget to take your membership card with you when you go to Munich!

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Technical Museum Munich

    by MichaelFalk1969 Written Aug 25, 2006

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    This great museum in Munich deals comprehensively with every aspect of man-made machinery and tools, including ships, planes, automobiles, rockets and space travel. The collection is so vast, you will probably need a whole day - so better concentrate on the exhibitions you have a special interest in.

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  • Deutsches Museum

    by sabsi Written Jun 6, 2006

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    Planes
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    Deutsches Museum is the German technology museum. Here you find everything from planes and boats to computers and mining memories. For a visit you should at least reserve half a day, if you want to explore and read everything you'll need at least a full day. We visited for an afternoon on a rather grey day and I loved it. We only checked out areas that we found interesting and in the end we were still running out of time. However, there are quite a few boring sections as well you can skip. Which those are you have to decide for yourselves.

    I enjoyed all the old ships and different planes most. We also walked around the mining section. You spend this time in reconstructed mines of different kinds - coal, salt etc. As it's very dark in there and the air is rather "coalminey" I was happy to get out of this section again after approx. half an hour... Anyway, it was a great afternoon. And when we came out at 5 after the museum closed the beergarden weather had finally arrived :)

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Science and technics as far as the eye can see!

    by Roeffie Updated Jun 15, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutsches Museum

    Deutsches Museum

    The biggest museum on technics I have ever seen. Easy to get lost in this museum for a day or two!

    There are for floors containing 45 sections of the most different subjects!

    From computertechnics to agricultural and food processing section.

    Planes, trains, automobiles!

    Just name it and they got it!

    Opening Hours
    Daily from 9.00-17.00 hrs. except for some holidays.

    Admission
    Adults € 7,50
    Children 6-15 Yrs. € 3,00
    Familycard € 15,00

    This is plain cheap for such a wonderful museum!

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  • kaveh-A's Profile Photo

    A reveiw on Sience History

    by kaveh-A Written Mar 28, 2005
    museum

    It was the first time that I could enjoy a muesum in my life. I think it's a big miss for everybody who goes to munich and dose not see this beatiful museum.
    you can find everything inside it. if you are interested in ships, cars, bicycles, trains, electrical equipments, music instrumnets, chemistry, physics, math, medical science or etc, you must go there and find a complete information about it

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  • 15ilikestuff's Profile Photo

    BA in German and Engineering Required

    by 15ilikestuff Updated Jan 7, 2005

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    Deutches Museum

    I'm probably going to get some criticism for this review but here it goes: I did not enjoy the Deutches Museum. I'll start with the good things: it's cheap, it offers a fantastic aviation exhibit, it has historical significance (it's very very old), and it has some interesting nooks. Here's the bad news for us Americans: exhibits are almost all in German Unfortunately, to understand a lot of what the museum is trying to show, you have to be fluent in German (and some science is hard enough to understand in English).. Of course, it's a museum in Germany so naturally I can't hold that against it. The main problem is that exhibits are not interactive (so maybe not the best for certain age groups), it's flooded with tourists and students, and half the museum is devoted for engineering types. Personally I am not interested in room after room of heavy machinery. The chemisty section (the most interactive) is composed of windows, behind which, are 2-4 fluids, you press the button, they mix, they change color, they disappear. This shows a chemical reaction, but somewhere after the thirteenth one it loses its novelty. Many exhibits are also broken (which is common for a science museum). Overall, I think many of the exhibits do a poor job illustrating the concepts in an effective and attention grabbing way. I'm not saying this is a bad museum (some people consider it to be one of the top museums in the world), but non-engineer types may not be content, and compared to some of the other science museums I have visited, this is not one of my favorites.

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by globetrott Updated Sep 4, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    deutsches Museum


    Deutsches Museum is a technical museum with Europe's biggest collection of exhibits and 1,3 Millions of visitors each year.
    The museum was built in 1906 on a seperate island in the Isar and from the beginning it did not only show "dead" technical things, but explained as well, how everything is working.
    You could watch physical and chemial experiments, electricity , you could walk inside a submarine or a Faraday cage .
    there are cars, airplanes, ships, space-ships, a windmill and even a mine, a Planetarium and finally an IMAX-cinema.

    The museum is open daily :
    09.00a.m.-05.00p.m.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by acemj Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    The Deutsches Museum is a huge museum all about German contributions to science and technology and boy, are there ever a lot!! The collection is very impressive and contains items such as the first Benz automobile from 1886 and the laboratory bench at which the atom was first split in 1938. For all you science buffs out there, this is a must see!

    Admission: 7.5 Euros/adults, students under 30 and kids 6-15 are 3 Euros, kids under 6 are free

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  • ahoerner's Profile Photo

    Amazing museum

    by ahoerner Written Jun 8, 2004

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    This is one of the most complete museums about technology.

    From the old human ages up to the current days, the museum is the right choice if you are tech-curious. You can spend there some days walking around.

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  • Rawabi's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by Rawabi Written Aug 29, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutsches Museum

    Not really my thing!!! I'm not a big fan of science.. my true calling is arts and literiture.. but HAD to go to this museum! mainly coz my brothers and sister wanted to.. but also I couldn't skip this landmark of Munich..!

    A tip: if you don't like science, DON'T go there! you'll bore yourself to sleep..! but otherwise.. it is a great place..! :)

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