Deutsches Museum, Munich

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  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    This Science Museum Has Everything

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Nov 20, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Overwhelming is the word that best describes my reaction to a visit to the Deutsches Museum. The number of topics covered and the detail of some of the exhibits make it understandable that this museum is the largest museum of science and technology in the world.

    As soon as entering the museum I would strongly recommend sitting down and deciding where you want to focus your attention on. If you don't you will likely not be able to see the exhibits that are of the most interest to you since the museum covers some 50 subject areas. My favorite exhibits were the sections on energy and medicine. The reproduction of the cave and the paintings were also outstanding.

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    Deutsches Museum - science and technology galore

    by Trekki Updated Aug 4, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Since I can think back Deutsches Museum was high on my wish list. But then... it is in Munich, thus Germany and first I had to “conquer the world”. Only since recently I am a regular visitor of southern Bavaria and Munich and in February 2012 I finally managed to visit the museum.
    What can I say? It is overwhelming, that’s for sure. I have read that the museum owns approx. 100.000 exhibits, and only approx. 30.000 are on permanent display. The collection grew over the time so that the original museum building on an island in Isar River was too small to house several collections. That is why the bigger exhibits have been transported to external sites: trains are in Lokwelt Freilassing (train world Freilassing), planes are in Flugwerft Schleissheim, anything regarding public transport and mobility in Verkehrszentum and there is even an offshoot in Bonn (near Cologne).

    The huge areal of the museum – 50.000 m2 on eight floors – and the many different themes make visit preparation a crucial thing: unless you have a couple of months at hand, check which parts you want to see, where these are located and plan your “walking path” through the museum. On the floor map you can see which exhibits are where. Also make sure you check if the exhibits you want to see are open or not, because renovation seems to be constantly ongoing. When I was there for example the planetarium was closed. I had approx. 5 hours including lunch but still could not see everything I planned to do. It was also a bit sad to see that some exhibits, especially the ones which should be animated, did not function anymore. If the repair of these is part of the renovation process, I don’t know, I simply forgot to ask. But I was very amazed how lovely the many scientific themes were explained. Many have these little cute dioramas, some bigger and some smaller.

    The museum is indeed wonderful, however keep in mind that exhibitions could be closed and, which is a real downside in my opinion, explanations at many of the exhibits are in German only, and even from just post-war times, given the fonts of typewriters.

    Opening hours:
    Daily, 9:00 – 17:00 (5 p.m.).
    Admission fees:
    at the time of my visit (Feb 2012), entrance fee for adults was 8,50 Euro, and 3 Euro for children age 6 – 15.
    See opening hours and prices for actual prices.

    Directions:
    The closest S-Bahn station is Isartor (5-10 min north), the closest metro station is Fraunhofer Strasse (5-10 min west). There is a bus station for bus no 132 just outside of the museum in Erhardstraße (left hand side after the bridge when you walk out of the museum).

    Location of Deutsches Museum on Google Maps => Munich is three dimensional already in Google Maps :-)

    © Ingrid D., September 2012 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.)

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Amazing Museum

    by Donna_in_India Updated Dec 28, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    With 50 exhibit sections spread over 47,000 sqm, you can easily spend days in this wonderful museum. We spent some time in the marine exhibit – huge ships – before getting to the aviation exhibit where we saw all kinds of planes from the beginning of aviation history to present day including space shuttles. It was set up so well – the whole museum is.

    After a few hours in the museum we left the museum to have lunch. There are several places within walking distance.

    Returning back to the museum, we went through several more sections, Bridge Building, Energy Technologies, Computers, etc. There's something of interest for everyone!

    There's also a planetarium and a guided 2 1/2 hour tour (both for an extra charge).

    The subject areas include: Aeronautics, Aeronautics, Agriculture/Food technology, Altamira Cave, Amateur radio, Astronautics, Ceramics/Pottery (mini-brickmaking machine), Chemistry (experiments), Computers/Mikroelectronics, Electron microscope, Energy technologies, Geodesy, Glass, Glassblowing, High-voltage unit G (very loud!), Machine tools, Marine Navigation, Metals: moulding and casting, Metals: from ore to metal, Mining, Modelrailway, Musical instruments, Observatory – West Dome, Optics, Paper (handmade), Pharmacology , Power machinery, Printing, Telecommunications, Observatory – East Dome.

    The Deutsches Museum is open daily from 09:00 to 17:00.

    Admission costs € 8.50 for adults, € 3 for children aged 6 and over, € 7 per person for groups.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by acemj Updated Aug 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Deutsches Museum is a huge museum all about German contributions to science and technology and boy, are there ever a lot!! The collection is very impressive and contains items such as the first Benz automobile from 1886 and the laboratory bench at which the atom was first split in 1938. For all you science buffs out there, this is a must see!

    Admission: 7.5 Euros/adults, students under 30 and kids 6-15 are 3 Euros, kids under 6 are free

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by globetrott Updated Sep 4, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    deutsches Museum


    Deutsches Museum is a technical museum with Europe's biggest collection of exhibits and 1,3 Millions of visitors each year.
    The museum was built in 1906 on a seperate island in the Isar and from the beginning it did not only show "dead" technical things, but explained as well, how everything is working.
    You could watch physical and chemial experiments, electricity , you could walk inside a submarine or a Faraday cage .
    there are cars, airplanes, ships, space-ships, a windmill and even a mine, a Planetarium and finally an IMAX-cinema.

    The museum is open daily :
    09.00a.m.-05.00p.m.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 21, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Deutsches Museum
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    This is one of the world's largest technology museums. They have four dozen permanent exhibits, for instance on Railways, Computers, Weights and Measures, Astronomy, Carriages and Bicycles. They say the permanent exhibits alone cover a floor area of 55.000 square meters, so don't go there expecting to see it all.

    What I am planning to see next time is the Computer exhibit, which includes the historical Z3 and Z4 machines by Konrad Zuse (1910-1995).

    The Z3 was competed in 1941, and they say it "is considered to be the very first freely programmable, fully automatic calculating device." It was destroyed during the war, but the museum has a full-scale functioning replica that was authorized by Zuse himself.

    The Z4 is absolutely original, though, since Zuse saved it from wartime destruction by smuggling it out to Switzerland in 1944. It was finished in 1945 and was used for calculations between 1950 and 1959. At times it was the only functioning computer in Europe.

    (There is a replica of Zuse's first machine, the Z1, at the German Technical Museum in Berlin. Also there is a functioning Z22, with 415 vacuum tubes, at the Center for Art and Media (ZKM) in Karlsruhe. For more information on Konrad Zuse, please have a look at my Bad Hersfeld intro page.)

    The museum is open daily from 9 am to 5 pm, except on certain holidays.

    Admission is EUR 8.50 for adults, or EUR 5.00 if you get concession, for instance if you can prove that you are unemployed, retired or handicapped, or have a Munich Welcome Card. Students and children pay only EUR 3.00.

    They also have a planetarium. I've never been there, but I have just learned that it is the only planetarium outside of North America which offers discounts to members of the Planetary Society. So don't forget to take your membership card with you when you go to Munich!

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    There's More to Munich than Beer

    by travelfrosch Updated Aug 6, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutsches Museum

    A great place to visit, especially if you're tired of beer and it's a rainy day, is the Deutsches Museum on Museum Insel, just east of Marienplatz. The museum contains all sorts of exhibits on science and engineering, similar to the U.S. Smithsonian.

    Admission is EUR 8.50, EUR 3 for children. A Family Ticket costs EUR 17, while a 10-pack ticket (valid at either the museum or the Hellabrunn Zoo) costs EUR 60. Planetarium shows (normally in German) cost EUR 2 extra.

    Open daily, 9AM-5PM. Closed selected holidays -- see the website for details.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Messerschmitt Me 262, Deutches Museum, Munich
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    If you want to see a V2 rocket, Messerschmitt Me 262, or an Enigma machine, then somewhere in this vast museum of technology you will find it. Each section in this technological cornucopia felt like a turn in a game of Civilization, with each hall I discovered a new science, with familiar names like Metallurgy, Bridge Building and Machine Components. Each of these sections was overflowing with exhibits, mostly with a German flavour. Some of the sections were not as exciting as the others, but anyone with an interest in technology is bound to find something to love in here. For example I was less than enthralled by the 1976 Rotary Drilling Unit, but there was a group of Americans from the oil industry in the same place who were just overawed and running from exhibit to exhibit. It's unlikely you'd be able to give every part of the museum a decent look, even if you spent an entire day there, so I think missing the sections you aren't interested in would be the only sane way of dealing with it.

    Amazingly, the main part of the museum, on the Museuminsel island in the river Isar, is only part of an even greater series of Museums. The other two are further out from the center, and focus specifically on two popular technologies: transport and aerospace. The main museum has a significant collection of aeroplanes, but the main aerospace museum at Schleissheim is based on a former military airbase and is much bigger. Both of the branch museums can be seen by purchasing a single 10 euro ticket, which allows you to visit all three over a period of a week. Alternatively you can buy individual tickets for each.

    The other two branch museums are covered separately.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by Sjalen Updated Jun 14, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I haven't got enough superlatives for this museum. It has simply ended up as one of this family's favourite museums ever - we went there on the only really rainy day we had, as our book made it sound good for a 6-year-old as well as her parents. That's just it - this place appeals to you whatever your age, gender and interest! Set up as a Science and Technology Museum, you might think it sounds dull, but this shows things in a very educational way (also in English) so that everyone can understand. It makes everything technical around you interesting and fun (and interactive here and there), whether it is a V2 rocket or a clarinett. Apart from aircraft and musical instruments, the museum has things on space travel, shipping, trains, cars, medicin, bridges, tunnels, electricity, environment, food manufacturing, IT history, mapping...it is huge! This means that whatever your interest, you will find something appealing - we found so much it took us six hours in there, and then we only really left as the restaurants were packed (due to the weather it was crowded) and our feet too sore to walk more! But not before seeing the museum showpiece: a mine. I am not with you kidding when I say that the entire cellars has been turned into mines. Just when you think the old part with pit ponies was it, along comes another flight of stairs into a modern mine with huge machinery! Mind blowing place. You can also climb its tower for a city view.

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  • Deutsches Museum

    by sabsi Written Jun 6, 2006

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    Planes
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    Deutsches Museum is the German technology museum. Here you find everything from planes and boats to computers and mining memories. For a visit you should at least reserve half a day, if you want to explore and read everything you'll need at least a full day. We visited for an afternoon on a rather grey day and I loved it. We only checked out areas that we found interesting and in the end we were still running out of time. However, there are quite a few boring sections as well you can skip. Which those are you have to decide for yourselves.

    I enjoyed all the old ships and different planes most. We also walked around the mining section. You spend this time in reconstructed mines of different kinds - coal, salt etc. As it's very dark in there and the air is rather "coalminey" I was happy to get out of this section again after approx. half an hour... Anyway, it was a great afternoon. And when we came out at 5 after the museum closed the beergarden weather had finally arrived :)

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  • Rawabi's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by Rawabi Written Aug 29, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutsches Museum

    Not really my thing!!! I'm not a big fan of science.. my true calling is arts and literiture.. but HAD to go to this museum! mainly coz my brothers and sister wanted to.. but also I couldn't skip this landmark of Munich..!

    A tip: if you don't like science, DON'T go there! you'll bore yourself to sleep..! but otherwise.. it is a great place..! :)

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by mindcrime Written Feb 6, 2013

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    If you get excited with technology and science you MUST visit Deutsches Museum, the largest museum of its kind and the most popular in Munich.

    It was founded in 1903 on museumsinsel, an island on Isar river.
    The museum is huge and its imposimple to visit everything in one day (not even a month will be enough I guess) as there are thousands different exhibits spread on 8 different floors! So check the plan first and choose what themes seems more interesting to you (there are about 50 different themes!). Have in mind that most of the airplanes are now located at Flugwerft Schleissheim, trains at Lokwelt Freilassing and other public transport media are located in Verkehrszebtum.

    What I liked most in this museum was the fact that you can interact with many items and really see
    how something works/sounds/look, what’s more there are extremely useful panels with info, photos, animated slides or video which make the experience better due to the difficulty of some scientific themes. Unfortunately some things didn’t seem to work properly or were just out of order.
    We started from the engines section, we passed by the music instruments, we saw the farmacy section, we checked the cryptological divices, numerous recorders, we saw the first huge computers (some were as big as a room, in fact some of them were a room, you could walk inside them!). Then we checked many telecommunication devices, we passed by textile technology only to end up at photography section.

    We didn’t have time for sections like: paper making, glass, ceramics, chemistry, chronometry, environment, hydraulic engineering, marine navigation, mathematical, physics and many many others

    It’s open daily, 9:00–17:00
    The entrance fee is 8,50 Euro (7e with CityTourCard)

    Museum store has some funny/weird items

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Where Bigger and Better Overlap

    by hquittner Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Several Different Vessels (out of water)
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    This is a technical scientific museum, the largest we have ever seen. The museum contains over 48 subject areas covering the technical activities of civilization, each laid out in meticulous absorbing detail It has outgrown its original structures and has annexes. ( The same thing has occurred at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.). We had avoided it on two previous visits but we now had two 17 year olds in tow. They were disappointed; they chose to visit the marine and automotive sections first. Two full hours was their limit (and ours). The exhibits are primarily historical and didactic. Progress is relentless and to them irrelevant. They then headed to the BMW factory-museum where they again saw many cars that they could not afford , which was OK, but again a lot of old ones. Their factory tour was just OK too. (We escaped to the Alte Pinakothek--See Our Tips).
    Before you go to the Deutsches Museum make sure you visit the website and choose and locate the areas of interest to your group on a museum map. Do not be waylaid by other attractions that you encounter. There are convenient lunch sources too.

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  • The world's largest museum of science & technology

    by meadwaytourer Updated Jul 14, 2007

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    Enigma machine on display in the computing section

    A trip to Munich is incomplete without a visit to the magnificent Deutsches museum.

    This massive sprawling collection of scientific and technological exhibits is housed in a wonderful old building on the eastern bank of the River Isar close to the Isartor gate.

    Amongst the themes covered in the seperate halls are aeronautics and space, materials, metallurgy, electronics and computing, telecommunications, chronometry, construction, astronomy, physics, chemistry and mathematics. There is also an observatory and planetarium. All in all, it is a marvellous celebration of science, engineering and technology.

    One of the most notable exhibits is the entire mining department, where you are taken underneath the museum into a series of specially constructed mineshafts. These show the history of how man has extracted minerals and deposits over the centuries and it gives you a real idea of just how dangerous mining was in the early days.

    I was also impressed by the aeronautics and space halls and the section on the development of electronics (covering early analogue through to digital and modern computing).

    You could probably spend two or three days in the museum but we manged to cover all the areas of interest in around three hours. The cost of entry was € 8.50 per person and € 3 for children/concessions

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    It's a biggie

    by iandsmith Written Jul 18, 2007

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    From the other side of the river
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    This is a museum in many parts. The largest of which is on the Museum Island. One of the world's largest science and technology museums, it promises much but delivers more.
    Do you want to see airplanes, submarines, the first X-ray machine? Live demonstrations and hands-on instructional aids are fun and informative for the visitor. The Deutsches Museum has everything, from a coal mine to the stars! But to see it all, you'll have to walk 16 kilometres.
    The first thing you will probably come across is the maritime section, though you could be excused when seeing the picture 2 that you have just come across some Aussies after a late night in a beer hall.
    There are models of ships (pic 5), full blown models of engines (pic 4) and even ships themselves (pic 3); the latter being of a size no longer needed in the modern world.
    A new branch of the Deutsches Museum, the "Flugwerft Schleissheim" - a reconstructed airplane factory - has opened in Oberschleissheim.

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