Deutsches Museum, Munich

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 43 Reviews

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  • 15ilikestuff's Profile Photo

    BA in German and Engineering Required

    by 15ilikestuff Updated Jan 7, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutches Museum

    I'm probably going to get some criticism for this review but here it goes: I did not enjoy the Deutches Museum. I'll start with the good things: it's cheap, it offers a fantastic aviation exhibit, it has historical significance (it's very very old), and it has some interesting nooks. Here's the bad news for us Americans: exhibits are almost all in German Unfortunately, to understand a lot of what the museum is trying to show, you have to be fluent in German (and some science is hard enough to understand in English).. Of course, it's a museum in Germany so naturally I can't hold that against it. The main problem is that exhibits are not interactive (so maybe not the best for certain age groups), it's flooded with tourists and students, and half the museum is devoted for engineering types. Personally I am not interested in room after room of heavy machinery. The chemisty section (the most interactive) is composed of windows, behind which, are 2-4 fluids, you press the button, they mix, they change color, they disappear. This shows a chemical reaction, but somewhere after the thirteenth one it loses its novelty. Many exhibits are also broken (which is common for a science museum). Overall, I think many of the exhibits do a poor job illustrating the concepts in an effective and attention grabbing way. I'm not saying this is a bad museum (some people consider it to be one of the top museums in the world), but non-engineer types may not be content, and compared to some of the other science museums I have visited, this is not one of my favorites.

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  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    DEUTSCHES MUSEUM

    by Helga67 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutsches Museum, Munich

    it's well worth spending the whole day there. Some of the large-scale exhibits, such as biplanes and boats, are ranged in rooms the size of hangars. Among the mould-breaking inventions on view in the engineering section on the ground floor is the very first diesel engine. The chemistry department on the first floor features several notable historic displays, including the monastic pharmacy from St Emmeram in Regensburg, and original equipment from Justus von Liebig's Munich laboratory. Part of the second floor has been converted into a replica of the Altamira caves while in the basement there's a convincingly gloomy mock-up of a coalmine. Meticulously constructed large-scale models are featured throughout, and the use of interactive displays makes them as absorbing for kids as adults. Check the noticeboards for the times of the daily demonstrations given by museum staff; that of the historical musical instruments on the first floor is particularly worth catching.

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  • JimKnopf's Profile Photo

    Lightning

    by JimKnopf Updated Jan 29, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Video of Lightning in the German Museum
    YOu need lot of time to see all things t this museum. Minimum should be one day. Don't go too late there, time is fast over there. There are some different, very interesting, shows. You can see one video here of a lightning. That's something you shouldn't miss. And here is a second video. You can't hear the guy, who is explainig something, so good, is almost for German speaken difficult to understand, but guess doesn't matter because for this great show you don't need an explanation :-).
    Just enjoy it :-)
    Lightning page of the museum

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Technical Museum Munich

    by MichaelFalk1969 Written Aug 25, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This great museum in Munich deals comprehensively with every aspect of man-made machinery and tools, including ships, planes, automobiles, rockets and space travel. The collection is so vast, you will probably need a whole day - so better concentrate on the exhibitions you have a special interest in.

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  • paoseo's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museums

    by paoseo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the planes in the aeronautic sector
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    It’s one of the oldest and largest museums of technology and engineering in the world.
    It was founded in 1903 and the building in which is hosted is located on the island in the Isar.
    Visiting the museum really very well would take more than a day. You can choose some of the 40 sections or, as I did, starting from what you are more interested in and finish with what you are less interested in. I'm quite satisfied of the way I visited the museum, thaks also to a guide I bought at the entrance.
    Since before going to the museum I was told that all labels were written only in german I bought the guide (4euro) that helped me a lot. Anyway, in last year they have added also explications written in English.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Up in the air (almost)

    by iandsmith Written Jul 19, 2007

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    Is that the Red Baron I spy?
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    The museum is every mechanical minded person dream, no area more so than the aircraft area, but the last pic here holds the most poignant story.
    The Wagner family, five strong with three children aged 17,16 and 6 at the time, built this backyard aircraft and were preparing to fly it out of East Germany in 1981.
    Sadly, the day before they were due to leave they were arrested, charged and convicted of "Blatant preparation of a border crossing".
    During the court hearing the authorities attested to the airworthiness of the vehicle and the original intention had been to do a solo flight first from the Nonnewitz open cut coal mine near Leipzig before returning for the family.
    Though they received jail sentences the Austrian government made overtones and the family were allowed to leave for West Germany after serving a year in prison.
    The longest piece used in construction is only 4 metres long thus allowing it to be transported by road. The East German Ministry for National Security impounded it for their "Traditional Cabinet" in 1981 and, in 1990, it was shown as part of an exhibition of escape vehicles in the museum for "Deutsche Geschichte" in Berlin before being returned to its owner.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Some of the other things

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 20, 2007

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    Brain explosion
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    There's a myriad of exhibitions in this building, everything from how your brain functions (though that's something I could never understand) to clock movements, to architectural models and something I found quite interesting, tractors.
    Not something that would normally arouse any excitement in me but I have to say that the display of early model vehicles for farming was, at times, bizarre. The vastly differing solutions different people come up with for similar problems is never better displayed than here.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Museum

    by iaint Written Apr 23, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    aerospace
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    For the last 2 years all my Bavarian friends have been telling me how wonderful this place is. The only way to shut them up seemed to be to go. So yesterday (22-4-13) I did.

    I enjoyed it. There’s a lot to see, and I got tired so I didn’t manage it all, but that’s a good excuse to pop in for a couple of hours another time.

    I liked the architecture too. Functional and not beautiful in the normal sense, but it has style and suits its purpose.

    The highlights - many. The aeronautics area - full size planes, and lots of space exhibits. The computer section - great to see some of the old stuff. Some even older than me. The photographic part - I saw two old makes of camera I’ve owned. Remember the Kodak Instamatic?

    They have a stunning demonstration of electric power - artificial lightning and so on - usually happens 3 times a day. Check at information when you arrive.

    You’ll find a couple of self service restaurants inside, as well as a few snack bars. My lunch (pork schnitzel with French fries) was good, but a bit expensive for what it was at €8.50.

    A day ticket was €8.50. It included a free pass for one of their other locations - a vehicle museum and a flight one. Children’s entry is €3. A family ticket is €17.

    It’s open daily between 9 and 5, but closed on some public holidays. Check the website for precise details.

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  • Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleissheim

    by meadwaytourer Written Jul 12, 2007

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    The experimental X-31 at Flugwerft Schleissheim
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    If the aerospace hall at the Deutsches Museum leaves you wanting to see more flying machines, the good news is that the museum owns an even larger collection of aircraft which are exhibited at the Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleissheim.

    Flugwerft Schleissheim is a collection of old and new buildings on a historical airfied just north of Munich city. Like most of the attractions in Munich, a visit is made easy by the fantastically efficient public transport system. From the centre of the city you can take the trip up to Schleisheim after breakfast, spend a couple of hours looking at the exhibits and be back in town for lunch.

    Amongst the exhibits are an early Eurofighter test bed, the unique MBB-Rockwell X-31 vectored-thrust test plane, an F-4 Phantom, F-104 Starfighter and many others from earlier ages of flight. My favourite (because it is the only chance you will ever get to see one) was the lovingly restored experimental Dornier DO-31 - a German attempt to develop a civilian application for Harrier VTOL technology. The DO-31 has two outboard Rolls-Royce Pegasus engines as developed for the Harrier but was built to deliver freight rather than high explosives!

    The Schleissheim airfield in itself also has a fascinating history - told in detail for visitors - particularly the part it played in the aftermath of WWII. On top of that, the imposing and very grand palace of Schloss Schleissheim is a five minute walk from the museum. You should take the opportunity of at least a brief walk around the magnificent gardens on your way back to the station.

    Entry is five Euros per person - cheap at twice the price!

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  • ahoerner's Profile Photo

    Amazing museum

    by ahoerner Written Jun 8, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is one of the most complete museums about technology.

    From the old human ages up to the current days, the museum is the right choice if you are tech-curious. You can spend there some days walking around.

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Science and technics as far as the eye can see!

    by Roeffie Updated Jun 15, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Deutsches Museum

    Deutsches Museum

    The biggest museum on technics I have ever seen. Easy to get lost in this museum for a day or two!

    There are for floors containing 45 sections of the most different subjects!

    From computertechnics to agricultural and food processing section.

    Planes, trains, automobiles!

    Just name it and they got it!

    Opening Hours
    Daily from 9.00-17.00 hrs. except for some holidays.

    Admission
    Adults € 7,50
    Children 6-15 Yrs. € 3,00
    Familycard € 15,00

    This is plain cheap for such a wonderful museum!

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  • Deutsches Museum 2010

    by JovialJanna2 Written Aug 8, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We planned to see the Deutsches Museum on a Sunday because it is open on Sundays when many things in München are closed or operating in a lesser capacity on Sunday. This is one of the few good things I have to say about this Museum. First, let me start by saying that ever since I heard that the Deutsches Museum was the biggest and oldest Science and Technology Museum, I have been wanting to go there. I love science because the ingenuity of human beings is amazing, however, this Museum in no way paid homage to the brillant men and women that lent their time and knowledge designing the items inside it.

    Here are some of my major complaints
    - Museum supposedly opens at 9:00, but at 9:30 many exhibits were still closed.
    - Many exhibits were broken featuring permanent looking 'out of order' stickers
    - Translation of information on exhibits is inconsistent. While some items have translations into english, many do not.
    - Building itself does not lend anything to the experience, plain white walls drew no attention to the objects and did not invite exploration.
    - Docents or Museum help were practically non existent (when we did see one, she was reading a book rather than helping people find their way around this monsterous museum)
    - Expensive, it costs 8 € a person to enter this Museum, for what? They clearly are not updating and maintaining their exhibits.

    Until the Deutsches Museum updates its displays, I dont recommend it to non-german speaking travelers.

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  • seasonedveteran's Profile Photo

    Mechanical Engineers stomping grounds

    by seasonedveteran Written Mar 9, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Us being a group of some 10 engineers, sunday morning ventured to this museum. I almost lost the group on the streets of munich, but being logical engineers, we somehow met in the subway station leading to the museum!
    The museum has many many parts. Highlight include Aviation real life size planes from the WWI and II era, today, the real life coal mine (horses, carts, workers in the cracks and all!, and of course many many other stuff. So, be a good tourist and go!

    spending a while in the bridges section, i wish i became a civil. damn!

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Duetsches Museum

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 23, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Panorama of the building
    4 more images

    This is a huge and great museum, with many eclectic sites inside. The main theme is to see ships, planes, equipment, and autos/vehicles-but there is so much more. They have 100,000 objects and said to have 25,000 on exhibit normally; some very large, and others small.
    Side exhibits include glass blowing, paper making and the history, ceramics and how they are made, astronomy to include a planetarium (extra charge), and much more. You could easily spend 2 days here, to see all the sites in the 550,000 square foot building. We spent 4+ hours and did not see all we wanted to view.
    Entry is Euro 8,50 for adults, and is open 9-5 daily.

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  • roadnottaken's Profile Photo

    For a first-time visitor,...

    by roadnottaken Written Aug 26, 2002

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    For a first-time visitor, Munich's grand Deutches Museum creates quite an impression (at least, it did for me). The museum is focused on 'technical' displays (such as models and dioramas) and showcases everything form railways to aqueducts to jet engines and so on ... I particularly enjoyed the vintage cars, pictured.
    Many fascinating models, dioramas, displays, etc. Most exhibits also include detailed descriptions in German and English so that visitors can learn exactly how things work.

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