Feldherrenhalle, Munich

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  • Feldherrenhalle
    by mindcrime
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    protest at Feldherrnhalle
    by mindcrime
  • Feldherrnhalle
    Feldherrnhalle
    by mindcrime
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    Feldherrnhalle

    by mindcrime Updated Feb 7, 2013

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    Feldherrnhalle
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    Feldherrnhalle (Field Marshals’ Hall) is a nice structure we noticed on Odeonsplatz between Residenz and Theatinerkirche. It was built in 1844 by Friedrich von Gartner that had as a model Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence.

    The main statues are the military leaders Johann Tilly(1559-1632) who commanded the catholic league’s forces during Thirty Years’ War(1618-1648) and Karl Philipp von Wrede(1767-1838) a Bavarian field-marshal. There are also 2 stone lions that grace the steps made by W.Ruemann in 1906. Another sculpture composition is in the middle. It was added in 1882 (9 years after the Franco Prussian War) as a symbol of Bavarian Army.

    Feldherrnhalle is connected with the Nazi party as it was the reverse side of the silver Blood Order medal that was created in memory of the Munich Putsch (also known as Beer Hall Putsch), the unsuccessful attempt of Hitler to seize power in Munich on November 9, 1923 against Germany’s Weimar Republic government. It was here in front of Feldherrnhalle when the police and soldiers tried to stop the marching of Hitler’s followers (that were inspired by Mussolini’s march on Rome!) Four police officers and 16 nazis were killed during the exchanging fire, many were injured and got arrested, Hitler got arrested two days later charged with high treason. One year later he was sentenced to 5 years in prison but served only 9 months due to good behavior!!

    This attraction won’t take more than 1’, it’s one of these things that are on your guide book, you pass by you take the picture and that’s all, I guess some other people wont even bother with it (but that’s why I like to read history books)

    After visiting the Residenz we some locals protesting in front of Feldherrnhalle, protesting against genetically manipulated food and crops (pics 4-5, thanks Don for translation)

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    Feldherrenhalle

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 26, 2012
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    The three arched hall is a covered building that commemorates the generals serving under King Ludwig of Bavaria. He designated the construction and it took 1841-44 to complete. The front with the arches features two large lion figures guarding the front.

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    Feldherrnhalle

    by black_mimi99 Written Apr 27, 2012

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    Feldherrnhalle

    Munich's Felderrnhalle (Field Marshal's Hall) was built between 1841 and 1844. It is prominently located at the Odeonsplatz, at the former site of one of the city's main gates, the Schwabinger Tor. Built as a tribute to the Bavarian army that fought in the Franco-Prussian War, the 20 meter high structure features bronze statues of some of the most revered generals of Bavaria, count von Tilly (1559-1632) and marshall Wrede (1767-1838). The statues were designed with the help of drawings by German artist Ludwig Schwanthaler. In addition, two lions grace the steps. It is said that one is growling at the Residenz and the other is keeping its mouth shut towards the church. They were sculpted by Wilhelm Ruemann in 1906. The sculpture at the center of the loggia represents the Bavarian army and was created in 1899 by Ferdinand von Miller the Younger, son of the builder of the large Bavaria statue at the Ruhmeshalle. The Field Marshal's Hall became famous as the site of a pre-World War II skirmish between the Bavarian police and followers of Adolf Hitler.

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    'The Field Marshals' Hall'

    by slothtraveller Written May 20, 2011

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    Feldherrnhalle

    In 1841, King Ludwig I assigned his architect, Friedrich von Gaertner, the duty of constructing a monument symbolising the Bavarian Army's strength. The result is the Feldherrnhalle, a loggia monument inspired by the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence, Italy. It is one of the more striking buildings in the city centre of Munich.

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    Feldherrenhalle

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jul 14, 2007

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    Built in the mid-19th century as a monument to Bavarian generals Count Tilly (30 Year`s war) and von Wrede (Napoleonic Wars). An important event took place there in 1923 - an attempted coup by Adolf Hitler and 2000 of his followers (10 years before he came to power) was stopped there by local police by use of arms.

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    feldherrnhalle

    by doug48 Updated Sep 27, 2006

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    feldherrenhalle

    the feldherrnhalle, (field marshall's hall) was built by the wittelsbachs to honor bavarian generals. the two statues in the hall are of general johann tilly and karl philipp van wrede. tilly surrendered munich to the swedes which saved munich from a swedish seige. von wrede defeated the french at the battle of nations in 1815. the architechture of the feldherrnhalle was inspired by the loggia dei lanzi in florence. in 1923 2000 nazis fought government troops here in the failed beer hall putsch. when the nazis came to power in 1933 hitler designated the feldherrnhalle a national shrine. all citizens that passed this site were required to salute the fallen "martyrs" of the early nazi movement. an interesting web site to visit to see before and after pictures of nazi munich is www.thirdreichruins.com

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    Feldherrnhalle

    by traveloturc Written Aug 1, 2006
    Feldherrnhalle

    19th century monument for a number of Bavarian military leaders... Less gloriously, it was the rendezvous for Nazi stom troops in Hitler's unsuccessful putsch of 1923, and was a focus for marches commemorating the event... The building is modeled after the Late Gothic Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence

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    Peculiar Building With A Spectacular History

    by RhineRoll Written Feb 19, 2005

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    The Feldherrenhalle being snowed in

    The Feldherrenhalle, actually a copy of a Florentine palace, became infamous, because it was the scene of Hitler's failed coup back in 1923. He was sentenced to 5 years imprisonment, a ridiculous sentence and a shame for Germany's legal system whose judges were little more loyal to the young Weimar Republic than the Nazis themselves. This pretty much foreshadowed the total failure and deep involvement of the judicial system in the Nazis coming to and staying in power.

    The building itself is quite peculiar, somehow there's something oriental, something mosque-like about it. Don't you think?

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    Feldherrnhalle

    by Sjalen Written Nov 12, 2004

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    In November 1923, the police stopped a certain Adolf Hitler here as he was gathering in the Residenzstrasse with his gang. This is known as the Beer Hall Putsch and although I have no sympathy for the man, it feels strange to know that a historic event happened here. The building itself is modelled on a loggia in Florence. There are other buildings from this dramatic time around Königsplatz and the Haus der Kunst in Prinzregentenstrasse.

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    Feldherrnhalle & Theathinerkirche

    by globetrott Written Sep 3, 2004

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    The Feldherrnhalle was built 1841 similar to the "Loggia dei Lanzi" in Florence / Firenze.
    2 sculptures there show General Tilly and General Wrede who were sucessful warriors in Bavarian history...

    ...in 1923 Adolf Hitler tried to march with some of his "Generals" to the Feldherrnhalle, but was arrested before they were able to do a coup d'etat.

    Next to the feldherrnhalle you see Theatinerkirche on Odeonsplatz.

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  • Feldherrenhalle

    by sabsi Updated Aug 19, 2004

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    Feldherrenhalle

    Feldherrenhalle marks the end of the impressive Ludwigstraße. It was built in the 19th century - again to resemble Italian style. This time Loggia dei Lanzi was the building that was copied. There's several statues on the stairs - some show important people like General Tilly, others are the typical lions.

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    Feldherrenhalle on Odeonsplatz

    by Henkster Written Nov 17, 2003

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    Feldherrenhalle at night

    The Feldherrnhalle (Commander's Hall) is 20 m high and open arched.
    It was built in 1841 in the style of the Loggia di Lanzi in Florence. The hall was erected by King Ludwig I in honour of the Bavarian army.

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    FELDHERRNHALLE

    by Helga67 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Feldherrnhalle, Munich

    The hall shelters statues of Bavaria's two greatest military heroes: Johann Tilly, the imperial field marshal in the Thirty Years War, and Karl Philipp von Wrede, the commander of the Bavarian corps originally allied with Napoleon, which changed sides in time to help defeat the French at the Battle of the Nations. Between the two is a memorial to the Bavarian dead of the Franco-Prussian War. It was here on November 9, 1923 that armed police stopped Hitler's Beer Hall Putsch in its tracks, opening fire on the future dictator's band of would-be revolutionaries as they stood at the head of the narrow Residenzstrasse, in the shadow of the Feldherrnhalle.

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    Feldherrnhalle

    by mvtouring Written Oct 1, 2010

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    The Feldherrnhalle was built in the early 1840's. It houses the two sculptures of General Tilly and General Wrede who fought in the 30 year war.

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    Feldherrenhalle

    by tini58de Updated Aug 31, 2004

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    Feldherrenhalle and Theatinerkirche

    The Feldherrnhalle (Commander's Hall) is 20 m high and open arched and was built in 1841 in a Florentine style. The hall was erected by King Ludwig I in honour of the Bavarian army.

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