Frauenkirche, Munich

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  • SMILLA76's Profile Photo

    The Lady's Church

    by SMILLA76 Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    This is the church with the footprins of the Devil.

    The story goes like this: People had been talking about the beauty and the magnitude of the church and so the Devil came to see it. When he took a step inside, he first saw no windows and so he hit the ground and gave a cry of joy because he thought it was a church of darkness. The mark left in stone is today's evidence of the story. Apparently taking a further step the devil saw the windows and ran away in distress, no other signs of his visit left.

    Free entrance. Footprints optional.

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Great View of Munich

    by Donna_in_India Written Jan 7, 2008

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    View from top of dome

    At Marienplatz we went into the Cathedral of our Blessed Lady, a Gothic church. It's a fairly plain church, but very large - able to hold 20,000 people.

    The church has 2 onion domes one of which you can climb for the highest viewpoint in the city at 280 feet. Fortunately we only had to climb 86 steps and then take an elevator the rest of the way. The sky was pretty clear and we had a good view all around. What was very interesting was that all the buildings were short. With very few exceptions, none of the buildings were over 5-6 stories high.

    If you visit the church, be sure to go to the top! No entrance during services.

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  • flyingscot4's Profile Photo

    Church of Our Lady

    by flyingscot4 Updated Nov 9, 2007

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    Die Frauenkirche (Cathedral of Our Lady)
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    In all ways, this church is a "do not miss" location in Munich. The twin onion-dome towers are unmistakable from anywhere in the city. Though largely destroyed toward the end of WWII, the cathedral was rebuilt and continues to serve it's congregation as it has since the late 13th century. While the interior is not ornate, there is an understated beauty and elegance in this magnificent "Dom" (cathedral) which serves as Munich's best-known symbol. It also houses the tomb of Ludwig IV of Bavaria.

    The Frauenkirche is also important in other ways. As the "symbol" of Munich, the city elders have decreed that no building shall rise above the onion-dome towers of the cathedral. Consequently, there are no skyscrapers in the Old City of Munich. Also, for those unafraid of heights, you can walk some steps and then take an elevator to the top of one of the towers.

    As an aside, the current Pope was the Archbishop of the Frauenkirche.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Symbol of Munich

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 12, 2007

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    The Cathedral of Our Blessed Lady, the largest church in southern Germany, dominates the city skyline as munincipal law forbids buildings of any greater height. Still today an active church, it is also one of the oldest buildings in Munich. Construction began in 1468 by Wittelsbach Duke Sigismund and took 20 years. The red brick exterior is simple without the typical Gothic ornamentation. The somewhat incongruous Byzantine domes replaced the original plan for thin spires and were added in 1525 allegedly modelled after the Dome of the Rock. Following severe bomb damage in WWII reconstruction took almost 50 years. And once again this church became an enduring symbol of Munich as well as one of its most popular attractions.
    Across from the church on Frauenkircheplatz is an interesting water feature, a pond surrounded by tiered seats and shaded by trees.
    The interior is also relatively simple. From the front entrance the pillars are placed so that the windows cannot be seen and the entire church appears mysteriously well illuminated. Many members of the Wittelsbach dynasty are interred here included HRE Louis IV, some in striking tombs including one of black marble. There are numerous wooden carved figures of assorted saints and apostles, as well as several sacred paintings. Of the paintings, the most striking is The Protecting Cloak placed behind the altar. It illustrates the Virgin Mary holding open her robes and protecting mankind with multiple figures inside.
    The church is open to visitors seven days a week and does not charge an admission fee. It is one of the most important must-visits in Munich

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  • Italian-Design Churches

    by Manyana Updated Sep 30, 2007

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    italian interior design

    if you walk around munich, you'll find loads of churches that look so italian in design, interior and exterior.

    i was told that they were original designed by italian architects, and i wonder why would the bavarians not have a bavarian design instead? but the geographical location and the closeness to italy has facilitated the cultural exchange, fascinating!

    it was very interesting to see these churches having loads of little and middle figures of the christ and his cradle and the biblical stories related, all featured during christmas. i always thought of germany as a secular hedonistic culture but it's nice to celebrate spirituality (or religion) once in a while - italian or bavarian:D

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  • chiara76's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche.

    by chiara76 Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Frauenkirche. Munich.
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    The largest church in Munich and one of the biggest turistic attracion there. The first church on that place was in XII but it was recuilt in years 1477-1488 (the towers was builded in year 1525). There is a big tomb monument of Emperor Louis IV in this church.

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  • culgharper's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by culgharper Written Sep 9, 2007
    Frauenkirche
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    Frauenkirche is the largest gothic assembly building in southern Germany. It is within a very short walking distance of Marienplatz and easy to find. It is huge! Inside is the very ornate tomb of Emperor Ludwig IV of Bavaria and they allow you to take photos in this very ornate church which was built in 1488. Easy to find and interesting inside. Not a long visit and within walking distance of many other historic buildings. Restaurants and shopping everywhere around.

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  • annase's Profile Photo

    A view over the roof tops

    by annase Updated Aug 10, 2007

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    A view of the city from south tower
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    If you only go to one place in Munich, go to the tower of the Frauenkirche (full name "Dom zu unserer lieben Frau", Cathedral of Our Blessed Lady) which is located right in the city centre. The tower is 99 meters (325 feet) high and you'll get a panoramic view of the city and the Alps from the top. This Catholic cathedral is the major landmark as its towers can be seen from all directions. The whole structure is 109 meters (358 feet) tall.

    There are actually two towers in the cathedral, but you can only climb into one of them. The admission fee is very small (only a few euros). Unlike most buildings in Munich's old town, one of the towers (but not the building itself) survived World War II intact. A major restoration was started after the war. It was completed in several stages, the last in 1994.

    The towers set a maximum height limit for any new buildings in the city. This new rule was adopted as result of a referendum in 2004, despite opposition from the local politicians in the city's parliament (Stadtrat) who feared that such a provision prohibiting the building of any structure over 100 meters would harm the city's attractiveness to investors. No sky scrapers to be built in Munich then.. Sorry folks. :-)

    Although you probably wouldn't be able to tell (I certainly wasn't), the two brass onion domes on top of the twin towers which are of Renaissance style fit awkwardly to the Gothic style of the rest of the building. The original design envisaged pointed towers like the ones in the Cologne Cathedral, but they were never completed due to lack of funding. The domes were added in the 16th century and nobody seems to have bothered to do anything about it since...

    The deco inside the cathedral is rather simple and stripped off elaborate ornaments. This is because much of the original Gothic interior has been destroyed or removed partially by contra-reformists. The most striking thing as you enter the cathedral is the lavish tomb monument of the Holy Roman Emperor Louis IV of Bavaria.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The stories behind

    by iandsmith Written Jul 19, 2007

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    Ludwig III's monument
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    The cathedral can hold around 20,000 people and Catholic services are held regularly. The interior of the cathedral, which is among the largest hall churches in southern Germany, consists of three naves of equal height (31m) though much of it was destroyed during WWII and the restored parts look plain by comparison. However, two of the attractions still can be found are the Gothic nave and the wonderful stained glass, shown here in a couple of my pictures.
    Ludwig was born in Munich, the eldest son of Prince Luitpold of Bavaria and of his wife, Archduchess Augusta of Austria (daughter of Grand Duke Leopold II of Tuscany). Ludwig was named for his grandfather King Ludwig I of Bavaria.
    Ludwig spent his first years living in the Electoral Rooms of the Munich Residenz and in the Wittelsbacher Palace. When he was ten years old, the family moved to the Leuchtenberg Palace.
    In 1861 at the age of sixteen Ludwig began his military career when his uncle King Maximilian II of Bavaria gave him a commission as a lieutenant in the 6th Jägerbattalion. A year later he entered the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich where he studied law and economics. When he was eighteen he automatically became a member of the Senate of the Bavarian Legislature as a prince of the royal house.
    In 1866 Bavaria was allied with the Austrian Empire in the Austro-Prussian War. Ludwig held the rank of Oberleutnant; he was wounded at the Battle of Helmstedt, taking a bullet in his thigh. He received the Knight's Cross 1st Class of the Bavarian Military Merit Order
    King Ludwig III, his consort Maria Theresia and their son crown prince RupprechtIn June 1867, Ludwig visited Vienna to attend the funeral of his cousin, Archduchess Mathilde of Austria (daughter of his father's sister Princess Hildegarde of Bavaria). While there Ludwig met Mathilde's eighteen year old step-cousin Maria Theresia, Archduchess of Austria-Este.

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jul 6, 2007

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    Frauenkirche

    This gothic church from the 15th century is the best-known landmark of Munich. The interior is somewhat disappointing if compared to the other Munich churches, especially St. Michael and the Theatiner Church. It also contains the grave of the only Bavarian Duke that became Emperor of the German Empire in the Middle Ages, Ludwig IV. You should not miss to climb the viewing tower with great views on the Old Town.

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  • Pattison78's Profile Photo

    The Coolest Church You Will See

    by Pattison78 Written May 27, 2007

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    Frauenkirche Towers
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    Frauenkirche is a fantastic cathedral with the "onions" atop the towers. Standing at the entrance and looking up at the towers is mesmerizing. It is so large that you can see the church from all over the city. You are even able to climb the south tower (for a price). The climb is worth the price as it offers excellent views of the city and distant views of the Alps.
    The church was built in the late 1400's but then had to be rebuilt after WWII in which it sustained significant damage from bombings.
    Inside the architecture is not as ornate as other gothic cathedrals, but it is cavernous and grand. Don't miss the Devil's Footprint and the Tomb monument of Emperor Louis IV.

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  • sylina's Profile Photo

    Peak of munich

    by sylina Written Nov 3, 2006

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    Frauenkirche
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    You will not find futuristic skyscrapers as in the other major cities, at least in the city center. There is a simple reason for this.

    No building is allowed to tower above Munich's landmark, the 99-metre-high Frauenkirche (church of our lady), the cathedral with its onion towers.

    The cathedral's history is very old. Even in the 12th century, still before the city was built, there was a little chapel at this place. In 1468 the actual foundations were laid by the architect Jörg von Halsbach (named Ganghofer). In 1488 the completion of the Cathedral tempted many pilgrims to Munich. The green gleaming cathedral bonnets – modeled on Italian renaissance domes – had been added in1524. Bomb damage has been left by the world II war. The reconstruction was finished by 1993.

    Inside, there seems no window in the cathedral— except for the tall chancel window, the windows are all hidden by the enormous pillars. According to legend, the devil was so delighted at the notion of hidden windows and stamped in glee at the stupidity of the architect — look for the strange footlike mark called "the devil's step" in the entrance hall.

    open hours: Sat-Thurs 7am-7pm; Fri 7am-6pm

    free of charge

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    the Frauenkirche

    by traveloturc Updated Aug 1, 2006
    twin towers

    The Old Town Hall was enlarged and a new cathedral - the Frauenkirche - constructed only in twenty years from 1468 onwards. The cathedral has become a symbol for the city with its two brick towers and onion domes.(99 m high).

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  • Castaner's Profile Photo

    The (spiritual) center of München

    by Castaner Written Jun 20, 2006

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    View of the domes from below
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    The Frauenkirche is one of the most stunning buildings in all of Munich. This is due in part to the fact that no building in central Munich is allowed to be taller than the Cathedral. Consequently, its magnificent domes tower over most of the city. It was damaged during WWII, and though it has been well rebuilt, the damage shows. The interior is rather modern compared to many other cathedrals. Still a must if you are in Munich.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by Nemorino Updated May 5, 2006

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    1. Frauenkirche
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    In the center of Munich, near Marienplatz and the Nationaltheater, is the Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche), which dates from 1488.

    After climbing a couple flights of stairs you reach an elevator which takes you to the top of one of the towers. From there, through the windows, you have views out over Munich in all directions.

    Second photo: A view to the northeast from the top of one of the towers of the Frauenkirche. The building in the foreground, with the white columns, is the Nationaltheater, home of the Bavarian State Opera.

    Third photo: A view to the south from the top of one of the towers of the Frauenkirche. The large white building in the middle is the Staatstheater am Gaertnerplatz, Munich's second opera house.

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