Frauenkirche, Munich

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by globetrott Written Aug 24, 2004

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    Fraunkirche seen from the tower of St.Peter

    "Domkirche zu unserer lieben Frau" is the official name for Frauenkirche. The gothic cathedral was built in 1468, just a few steps from Marienplatz.
    At that time Munich had just 13000 inhabitants, but the church could take a total of 20000 people.
    The church was partly destroyed during WW II and the total reconstruction lasted untill 1993.
    You may first take 180 steps up one of the 2 spires, and for the rest you may take the lift

    The best place to take your picture of Frauenkirche is on top of the tower of the church St.Peter / "Alter Peter"

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    Frauenkirche - the Cathedral

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 27, 2009

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    The spires of the Frauenkirche
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    The Frauenkirche, or Dom, is Munich's cathedral. It's the seat of the archbishop of Munich, with two huge spires that dominate the city's skyline. Like the nearby Peterskirche, it's filled with exquisite art treasures.

    Jörg von Halspach and Lukas Rottaler designed this cathedral. It was completed in 1488, and the spires were added in 1525. Notice the lack of typical Gothic flying buttresses; this cathedral is supported by interior columns instead. They hide the windows, except for the one way in the back. There is a legend that when the devil saw the inside and noticed the lack of windows, he laughed so hard at the architects that he stamped his foot on the floor. To this day, there remains an indentation on the floor called the "devil's step".

    Severely damaged in World War II, the great cathedral has been rebuilt. This is one of Munich's must-see treasures.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady )

    by smschley Updated Mar 19, 2005

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    The Frauenkirche or Church of Our Lady is one of Munich’s most noted landmarks and located close to the Marienplatz in the pedestrian zone. The two imposing oxidized copper onion-shaped domes atop the two 98-meter-high spires can be seen from many parts of the city, and its eight bells have a wonderful ring.

    The foundation stone was laid by Duke Sigismund, in 1468 and completed in 1488, of simple fairly monotonous red brick in a late Gothic style. It was extensively damaged during the Second World War, but the two towers are original. The building measures 109 meters high and is 40 meters wide. Its distinctive domes, which were built in 1525 served as a model for many of Bavaria's towers.

    The church is huge but simple. Much of the original gothic interior has been destroyed or removed partially by contra-reformists. In the crypt, you will find the tombs of the Wittelsbach family, where many dukes and bishops are buried. One of the most interesting things inside the church is the memorial grave in black marble of Prince Elector Kurfürst Maximilian I.

    Many foreigners seem more interested in finding the mark left by the devil’s right foot! This mark, resembling a footprint with a small hooked tail at the heel, is in the floor close to the main rear entrance, more or less in line with the gift shop. If you stand at this spot, it is impossible to see any of the side windows, which let in the ample amount of light. According to tradition, the church builder, Joerg von Halspach, bet the devil that he would build a windowless church and when the devil stood at this spot and realized he was duped. .

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Symbol of Munich

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 12, 2007

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    The Cathedral of Our Blessed Lady, the largest church in southern Germany, dominates the city skyline as munincipal law forbids buildings of any greater height. Still today an active church, it is also one of the oldest buildings in Munich. Construction began in 1468 by Wittelsbach Duke Sigismund and took 20 years. The red brick exterior is simple without the typical Gothic ornamentation. The somewhat incongruous Byzantine domes replaced the original plan for thin spires and were added in 1525 allegedly modelled after the Dome of the Rock. Following severe bomb damage in WWII reconstruction took almost 50 years. And once again this church became an enduring symbol of Munich as well as one of its most popular attractions.
    Across from the church on Frauenkircheplatz is an interesting water feature, a pond surrounded by tiered seats and shaded by trees.
    The interior is also relatively simple. From the front entrance the pillars are placed so that the windows cannot be seen and the entire church appears mysteriously well illuminated. Many members of the Wittelsbach dynasty are interred here included HRE Louis IV, some in striking tombs including one of black marble. There are numerous wooden carved figures of assorted saints and apostles, as well as several sacred paintings. Of the paintings, the most striking is The Protecting Cloak placed behind the altar. It illustrates the Virgin Mary holding open her robes and protecting mankind with multiple figures inside.
    The church is open to visitors seven days a week and does not charge an admission fee. It is one of the most important must-visits in Munich

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  • Domkirche zu unserer lieben Frau (Frauenkirche)

    by sabsi Updated Oct 3, 2004

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    Frauenkirche

    The towers of Frauenkirche are THE symbol for Munich. The nice and plain brick building is located at a windy square right in the centre of Munich. In my opinion it's nicer from far away than from standing in front of it or even inside it.

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    Die Frauenkirche

    by mccalpin Written Aug 18, 2004

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    Die Frauenkirche
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    Die Frauenkiche (the Church of the Holy Mother) – this magnificent church is on the Marienplatz, which itself is on the long pedestrian way that goes from Karlsplatz east almost all the way to the river Isar. The church towers are topped with the traditional onion dome caps, green with age. Green with age, I say? You need to go inside the church – on the back way (i.e., near where you enter) are photos of the church in 1945 – after Allied bombers had destroyed the roof and brought down one tower. After you examine the photos, then go back outside and see the change in the color of the brick on that tower – this will show you the extent of the damage.

    And you will marvel that the Germans were able to rebuild from such colossal devastation, and feel sad that such devastation was necessary to rid the world of Nazism.

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    Frauenkirche (Dom)

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

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    The Dom from Peterskirche
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    Just behind Marienplatz, a street north of the square, is the city's cathedral, the Church of our Lady. It's a little plain compared to ones in other parts of the country and isn't a patch on Cologne's Dom, but the cathedral has a certain charm and the twin onion domes poking up over the city roofs make for a pleasing site. Inside there are two sights of interest. First is the devil's foot by the door, and the second are the impossibly tall Gothic stained glass windows. The devil's footprint is a legend whereby the devil stamped his foot in rage when coming into the church to steal the church builder's soul through his windows. From the point of the foot pillars block each of the windows. At least they used to. It doesn't quite work since the cathedral was rebuilt after the war.

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  • DirtyRudy's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche in Munich

    by DirtyRudy Written Jul 12, 2004

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    Frauenkirche in Munich

    Munich's Frauenkirche was built in the 1400's and is located right near the Marienplatz. According to legend, the architect made a deal with the devil that the whole church would be showered in light, except for one spot -- the spot where the devil left his footprint.

    OK, maybe I got this legend wrong, but it went something like that!

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    Signature Building of Munich

    by dcwizard Written Feb 26, 2004

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    Looming Towers of Frauenkirche

    If there is one building that most defines the cityscape of Munich, it must be the Frauenkirche. This beautiful cathedral was built in 1488, and the signature twin bulbous towers were added in 1525. The interior is a bit bare and may seem strange to someone used to more decoration in churches. The bare interior is a good example of the postwar style: austere and simple.

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    Frauenkirche

    by acemj Updated Aug 20, 2004

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    The Church of Our Lady is most commonly referred to as the Dom (cathedral) and therefore, it is thought of as Munich's main church. The two tall towers are certainly easy landmarks to help orient yourself as you walk around town. The church dates to the late 15th century and the towers were added in the early 16th. Be sure to walk around the small curving streets around and especially behind the church to get a taste of the charming, Old World atmosphere of the area. Inside, most notably, you'll find a collection of wooden carvings of various apostles and saints.

    It's free to visit the church, but you'll pay two euros for the pleasure of climbing the towers and checking out the view.

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  • The Inside of Frauenkirche

    by sabsi Updated Oct 3, 2004

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    Frauenkirche

    The inside of Frauenkirche is very white and plain - entering here kinda reminded me of the disappointment when entering Tuomiokirkko in Helsinki ("That's it?"). There's not a lot to see (at least for me who isn't into religious sculptures) and the church feels much smaller than it actually is.

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Great View of Munich

    by Donna_in_India Written Jan 7, 2008

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    View from top of dome

    At Marienplatz we went into the Cathedral of our Blessed Lady, a Gothic church. It's a fairly plain church, but very large - able to hold 20,000 people.

    The church has 2 onion domes one of which you can climb for the highest viewpoint in the city at 280 feet. Fortunately we only had to climb 86 steps and then take an elevator the rest of the way. The sky was pretty clear and we had a good view all around. What was very interesting was that all the buildings were short. With very few exceptions, none of the buildings were over 5-6 stories high.

    If you visit the church, be sure to go to the top! No entrance during services.

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    THE CATHEDRAL

    by Hosell Written Apr 2, 2005

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    After visiting all nice places at Marientplatz,we went strolling to another very important place in the city of Munich,and very close to Marientplatz:FRAUENKIRCHE. this impressive gothic building was built in 1468 and destroyed during WW II.

    Right now is completly renovated and inside you can see a interesting old pictures in black & white,where you can see all the steps to the whole reconstruction of the Cathedral,really interesting!.

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    Frauenkirche

    by diageva Written Feb 11, 2004

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    FrauenKirche

    Espectacular building of read brick and 2 green onion form towers... that is very easely reconized .. because of its big size and colour .... also very destroied at the Worl War II and rebuilded...
    you will find her easily ... it will be at your way to Marianplatz ...

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    Guten morgen Muenchen.

    by hundwalder Updated Jun 8, 2005

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    guten morgen Muenchen

    All eight clocks ( the Bavarians insist upon knowing what time it is ) on the bell towers of domkirche zu unserer lieben ( Frauenkirche ) issued a sober reminder to me that it was indeed 8:30 AM and time to hurry back to nearby Hauptbahnhof, catch the S-bahn to Muenchen flughafen to catch my super bargain flight back to Charlotte. My legendary 13 day adventure through central Europe and the Adriatic seabord was finished much too soon.

    Construction on Frauenkirche, commonly known as the dom ( cathedral ) started in 1468. The twin bell towers were completed about 60 years later. This was an incredible accomplishment considering that this great city had less than 15,000 population at the time. The immense dom dominates Muenchen altstadt. The architectural style is early Renaissance, although there are many Gothic arches in the interior and the upper sections of the 100 meter high towers. The bell towers are capped with copper domes shaped like a sultan's crown. They are heavily oxidized giving them their green colour. Even a little Romanesque style is evident.

    The interior is plain compared with most Catholic cathedrals of the era, but there are many excellent wooden carvings ( which Bavaria is well known for ) of saints and the apostles.

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