Frauenkirche, Munich

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    The Cathedral.
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by Nemorino Updated May 5, 2006

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    1. Frauenkirche
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    In the center of Munich, near Marienplatz and the Nationaltheater, is the Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche), which dates from 1488.

    After climbing a couple flights of stairs you reach an elevator which takes you to the top of one of the towers. From there, through the windows, you have views out over Munich in all directions.

    Second photo: A view to the northeast from the top of one of the towers of the Frauenkirche. The building in the foreground, with the white columns, is the Nationaltheater, home of the Bavarian State Opera.

    Third photo: A view to the south from the top of one of the towers of the Frauenkirche. The large white building in the middle is the Staatstheater am Gaertnerplatz, Munich's second opera house.

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    The Salt and Pepper Shaker Church

    by 15ilikestuff Written Jan 6, 2005

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    Frauenkirche

    Fraunkirche is a Munich landmark and a very unique looking church. It's over 300 feet high and located in the old town. There's really no reason to go inside (unless you want to climb the 86 steps for a view of the city). The interior is plain and white. However, it is a mandatory (viewing from outside) along a tour of the old town.

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  • Janni67's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by Janni67 Written Nov 3, 2003

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    The twin towers of Frauenkirche

    Frauenkirche (built in 15th century) is easy to recognise with its' 99- meter high twin towers. You may not construct buildings in the Altstadt that would be higher than these towers.

    There's a legend, according to which Jörg von Halspach who built this church made a deal with Satan to get the money to complete the church, and according the deal the church must be built without any visible windows. Von Halspach was clever though and designed the church so that there is a point in the from where not a single window can be seen. The Satan got furious of this and stamped his foot so that an imprint in the pavement of the hall is still seen :)

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    Church of Our Lady

    by flyingscot4 Updated Nov 9, 2007

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    Die Frauenkirche (Cathedral of Our Lady)
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    In all ways, this church is a "do not miss" location in Munich. The twin onion-dome towers are unmistakable from anywhere in the city. Though largely destroyed toward the end of WWII, the cathedral was rebuilt and continues to serve it's congregation as it has since the late 13th century. While the interior is not ornate, there is an understated beauty and elegance in this magnificent "Dom" (cathedral) which serves as Munich's best-known symbol. It also houses the tomb of Ludwig IV of Bavaria.

    The Frauenkirche is also important in other ways. As the "symbol" of Munich, the city elders have decreed that no building shall rise above the onion-dome towers of the cathedral. Consequently, there are no skyscrapers in the Old City of Munich. Also, for those unafraid of heights, you can walk some steps and then take an elevator to the top of one of the towers.

    As an aside, the current Pope was the Archbishop of the Frauenkirche.

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  • chancay's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche in Munich

    by chancay Written Oct 5, 2004

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    there may be several more famous Frauenkirchen in Germany or in the world, the most famous ones are the Frauenkirche here in Munich and of course the Frauenkirche in Dresden. 2 totally different constructions, but both very impressive buildings. For Munich this church is one of the most important monuments, I would say.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by mvtouring Updated Sep 30, 2010

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    Frauenkirche
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    I am not able to tell you anymore about this lovely church than what is already available here on VT. All I am going to say it that this church with its twin onion-domed spires have become a symbol of the city and I loved my visit to this church.

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    Frauenkirche

    by dinhyen Written Jul 14, 2003

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    Inside Frauenkirche

    The rather sparsely appointed interior of the 500-year-old Frauenkirche. It was designed to be a Gothic structure, though the Renaissance towers were added much later. Only the towers survived WWII, the rest of the church having been rebuilt afterwards. I much prefer the more ornate interior of the Alter Peter.

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    Peak of munich

    by sylina Written Nov 3, 2006

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    Frauenkirche
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    You will not find futuristic skyscrapers as in the other major cities, at least in the city center. There is a simple reason for this.

    No building is allowed to tower above Munich's landmark, the 99-metre-high Frauenkirche (church of our lady), the cathedral with its onion towers.

    The cathedral's history is very old. Even in the 12th century, still before the city was built, there was a little chapel at this place. In 1468 the actual foundations were laid by the architect Jörg von Halsbach (named Ganghofer). In 1488 the completion of the Cathedral tempted many pilgrims to Munich. The green gleaming cathedral bonnets – modeled on Italian renaissance domes – had been added in1524. Bomb damage has been left by the world II war. The reconstruction was finished by 1993.

    Inside, there seems no window in the cathedral— except for the tall chancel window, the windows are all hidden by the enormous pillars. According to legend, the devil was so delighted at the notion of hidden windows and stamped in glee at the stupidity of the architect — look for the strange footlike mark called "the devil's step" in the entrance hall.

    open hours: Sat-Thurs 7am-7pm; Fri 7am-6pm

    free of charge

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    Fraunenkirche

    by mindcrime Written Feb 6, 2013

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    Fraunenkirche
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    Fraunenkirche (church of our Dear Lady ) is the Cathedral of Munich. This roman catholic church was built in gothic style, designed by Jorg von Halsbach. It was consecrated in 1494 (it took only 20 years) replacing an old romanesque church from 12th century. The onion-shaped domes (in renaissance style) were added in 1524 copying the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem. As many other buildings in Munich was damaged during WWII but reconstructed.

    The cathedral with its twin towers is a symbol of Munich and dominates its skyline as the law prohibits to raise buildings over 99 meters which is the spire’s hight. We were a bit disappointed by the exterior as it doesn’t have any gothic details, just plain red brick.

    Actually you can climb one of the towers during the warm months (10.00-17.00 Monday to Saturday) and enjoy the view.
    Once inside we realized how big it is, the cathedral can house about 20,000 people, I wonder what they had in mind in late 15th century when Munich had only 13,000 inhabitants. We didn’t really realize its size because there are rows of high columns. What’s more low light condition inside didn’t allow us to enjoy the interior which include numerous artworks dating between 14th and 18th century, among them E.Grasser, J.Polack, H.Krumpper). There’s also a famous legend, a black footprint near the entrance is called devil’s footstep as this is the spot where no window can be seen from there, it was architecture’s trick (using the columns) against the devil .

    As many other buildings in Munich the church was heavily damaged during WWII, after the war several restorations took place.
    At the crypt of the church are buried many dukes, kings of Bavaria and archbishops of Munich.

    It is open 7.00-19.00 saturday to wednesday, thursdays until 20.30, fridays until 18.00

    Just outside the church I noticed this nice scale model of Munich (pic 5)

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 6, 2006

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    Munich - Frauenkirche

    The most known symbol of Munich - Frauenkirche Cathedral. This building has the rich history closely connected with Vittelsbach and with their desire to create own crypt. The preceded significant building of first half XIII century was followed since 1468 with new construction. The assignment was given to Jorg fon Halspah. He built huge building Frauenkirche (109 meters at length and 40 meters at width) in the shortest terms in brick performance. After a bookmark of the first stone in 1468 duke Sigizmund and bishop Johannes Tulbek in 1494 it was probably solemn consecration of church. But towers were built only in 1525. The building with three naves with polygonal choruses quite corresponds to traditions south-German constructions.

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  • arlequin_g's Profile Photo

    Frauenkircke (the cathedral)

    by arlequin_g Written May 1, 2003

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    Other important symbol of Munich, with its two huge twin towers and the two green onion shape vaults. It's located in a very small and nice square.
    When you are at the main entrance look down to the floor. There is a footprint. It's said that it's devil's footprint.
    Go up to to tower, there is elevator. The price is 3 euros. Up there you can get some souvenirs.

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  • Henkster's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by Henkster Written Apr 19, 2003

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    One of Munich's Landmarks - the Frauenkirche

    The ‘Dom zu unserer lieben Frau’ (Cathedral of Our Lady), as the Frauenkirche’s full appellation runs, was built during the second half of the 15th century and consecrated in 1494. The green belfries of its soberly decorated towers are in the form of the so-called ‘Welsh Hood’. These towers are frequently seen in southern Germany, and soon became the city’s hallmark. They demonstrate the transition from Gothic to Renaissance. Many of the works of art donated to the church attest to the religiosity of the people of Munich through the centuries.

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    Frauenkirche

    by Sjalen Written Nov 11, 2004

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    The Dom of München is easy to recognise with its twin towers with onion domes, although twin is a bit of a lie as the towers have slightly different heights. It is possible to get up to the top of the southern on by lift (although you need to manage some stairs to get to the lift) for a good view of the city and beyond. Good if you want to orientate yourself. The church itself is known for its "Devil's footprint" where the devil is said to not have been able to see any of the church's windows, although that's lost its appeal today since the vision doesn't work after refurbishments. Not the most impressive church interior I have seen by any means but quite plain. However it is nice to have seen this famous landmark which has meant a lot for the city.

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    Symbol of Munich

    by Landotravel Updated Nov 12, 2010

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    Church towers
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    By far, the best known church at Munich, this Our Lady's Church -Frauenkirche- can be seen from many places leading the skyline. Its green bulbs over high towers are distinguising and mark the city's center, close to the Neue Rathaus.

    This building grows upwards and it's made in a kind of late gothic style marked by the verticality. In fact, when approaching it, surrounded by narrow streets, you have to rise the head. It seems to be there was a first church here in XIIIth century but the structure we can see now was made between XIVth and XVIth. It was hardly beaten when WWII and had to be rebuilt. That's why the inner shape seems so sober and clean. Being so famous it is not really the prettiest except for the maginificent external presence.

    As many churches here, the prettier the facade the more sober the inner. To fill the blank spaces the remains of the former decoration and tools were incorporated and that increases the sense of restoration making you to wonder what was the original church like.

    A curious detail: when entering the place you see a slab at the floor with a black footprint in it and everybody makes themselves photos stepping on it. It's a Munich legend: It's called the "devil's footprint" for it's said Devil couldn't take a single step further away from this place when he discovered it was a church. Funny.

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    Spectacular views from above, too.

    by adambeau Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Church of Our Lady

    Since it dominates the skyline from many distant landscapes and sites, a worthwhile visit includes the interior of this kirche and the view from the top.

    While the area surrounding it was almost completely destroyed during the war, including the church, the towers of this 500-year-old kirche (built in 1470) survived. The two onion domes were not added until more recent times during the Renaissance.

    The twin domes are often referred to by their distinct appearance, which look quite a bit like a frothy, overflowing beermug or bottle.

    Frauenkirche, Church of Our Lady, is the symbol of Munich.

    For an extremely enjoyable light snack or lunch, or to just admire the scenery while relaxing, a fantastic water garden with trickling waters awaits at the base of Frauenkirche. (pic coming soon)

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