Fun things to do in Munich

  • Marienplatz
    Marienplatz
    by mindcrime
  • Close up view of the entry & towers
    Close up view of the entry & towers
    by BruceDunning
  • Flowers in garden near palace
    Flowers in garden near palace
    by BruceDunning

Most Viewed Things to Do in Munich

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Gasteig Cultural Center

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 27, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Gasteig, which opened in 1985, is the home of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra as well as the Munich City Library, the Richard Strauss Conservatory, the city Singing and Music School and last but not least the Adult Education Center (Volkshochschule or VHS).

    In addition to the large Philharmonic Hall, with 2387 seats, the Gasteig also includes the Carl Orff Hall with up to 598 seats, the studio theater "Black Box" with up to 225 seats, a "Small Concert Hall" with 191 seats. a library lecture hall with 132 seats and several smaller concert and meeting halls.

    Second photo: When I took this photo, the Gasteig had recently celebrated its twentieth anniversary.

    1. The Gasteig 2. Gasteig twentieth anniversary
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Theater Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • littleman's Profile Photo

    Take a walk.

    by littleman Written Sep 21, 2013

    I found walking around Munich was the best way to see the city.Munich appears very safe,clean and easy to navigate.I had no concerns when walking around this city.Many people ride bicycles here and the bicycle paths are on the footpath/sidewalk so if you come from a country where they ride on the road...,you have to be careful.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Southern Bavaria is close by

    by Trekki Updated Sep 20, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Munich is an ideal hub for day trips into the surroundings. And the surroundings are great! The Alps are close and the pre-alpine landscape is majestic. Add to this countless little or bigger beer gardens, gorgeous monasteries, big and small churches and of course King Ludwig II’s castles of Neuschwanstein, Linderhof and Hohenschwangau. Add to this the famous villages of Mittenwald, Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Oberammergau and the Zugspitze, the highest mountain, you will have a hard time to judge.

    My personal favourites for day trips are Benediktbeuern, Rottenbuch, Steingaden and Wies Church - and of course the masterpiece of King Ludwig II: .Neuschwanstein Castle

    And for more reading I highly recommend:
    Mark’s Munich page with day tours,
    Brenda’s Garmisch-Partenkirchen page,
    Brenda’s Mittenwald page ,
    my own Bavaria page.

    © Ingrid D., September 2012.

    Rottenbuch former monastery church Steingaden former monastery (Welfenm��nster) Famous Wies Church Small church in Illgen (near Steingaden)

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Schloss Dachau

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I wasn't really prepared for the stunning views on offer at Schloss Dachau. I'd wandered into the city as a means of killing an hour or two of the afternoon before returning to Munich, but after wandering up the steps to the palace I was rewarded with a view of Munich which surpassed anything else I'd seen, or expected to see, anywhere in the city. My camera was simply not able to capture the dramatic and breathtaking nature of the views, and I was left feeling very jealous of the locals who could walk up here every weekend and soak up the view on the benches in the palace gardens.

    I might have been lucky that day, but I was able to see all the way to Munich and the Alps beyond. It was amazing to see so many of Munich's great sights all in one single vista, with the grand Arena and Olympic tower standing out in particular. For anyone who loves to see grand views of a city and snap them with their camera, a trip to Schloss Dachau is both an unmissable and unforgettable experience.

    Munich from Schloss Dachau Schloss Dachau and the Olympic Tower, Munich Schloss Dachau, Munich

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Maximiliananlagen

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stretching along the east bank of the river Isar and engulfing the Bavarian parliament at the Maximilianeum is the Maximiliananlagen park. Thick with trees and winding paths this park makes for arguably the best walks in the city during the riotously colourful period in late October and early November. The day I visited this park the sun broke through the canopy in hazy shafts of light, falling onto a carpet of soft, dry leaves that covered the entire warm red end of the spectrum: tans, ochres, chocolates, sand, coppers and coffee. This was worth a visit to the city on its own.

    Maximiliananlagen, Munich Maximiliananlagen, Munich Maximiliananlagen, Munich Maximiliananlagen, Munich Maximiliananlagen, Munich

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Volksbad

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Down by the banks of the river Isar is the amazing Volksbad (People's Baths). If the Olympic swimming pools weren't enough to satiate the denizens of Munich's desire for being pampered, then the opulence of the public baths cum miniature palace called the Volksbad must. Looking for all the world like something that would be very private, or at least very expensive, you can enter and swim in its grand and cavernous interior, along with an arched high stucco ceiling, for only a few euros.

    Volksbad, Munich

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    City Gates

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The medieval center of Munich is bounded on each side by gates which are still standing today. On the east and west sides of the city center are Karlstor, in Karlsplatz, and Isartor near the river. Between these two gates runs Munich's main pedestrianised shopping street. Sendlingertor can be found to the south of the city, but on the north side Siegestor is far north of Odeonplatz, near the University, on the way to Schwabing. Karlstor is commonly referred to as Stachus, after Eustachius Foederl who ran a beer keller there in the 18th century.

    Siegestor Karlstor (Stachus)
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Justizpalast

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1943 the Justizpalast was the scene of a trial of one of one of the unsung heroes of the war: the German resistance. Earlier, in 1941, Kurt Huber, a professor at Munich University, formed the White Rose group with a number of students and like-minded people. Two of Huber's students who had served on the Eastern Front were disgusted by the atrocities they had witnessed, and along with Huber were determined to overthrow the Nazi regime through a program of passive resistance inspired by the anti-racism movement in the US. For two years they flooded Germany, and Munich in particular, with literature opposing the Nazi regime. They even engaged in an audacious campaign of graffiti, daubing around 70 buildings across Hitler's favoured city of Munich with the slogan "Down With Hitler" and "Hitler, the Mass Murderer".

    "The name of Germany is dishonoured for all time if German youth does not finally rise, take revenge, smash its tormentors. Students! The German people look to us." - Fellow Fighters of the Resistance

    In 1943 they were spotted by a Nazi supporter in the University, handing out leaflets to students in the courtyard. Soon they were put on trial in front of massed ranks of gawking Gestapo and sneering SS. The judge Roland Freisler insulted, ridiculed and degraded the group members throughout the trial, and their defence was little more than a sham. Willi Graf, Kurt Huber, and Alexander Schmorell were found guilty of inciting sabotage, spreading defeatist ideas, aiding the enemy, and attempting to weaken Germany's armed security. They were found guilty of treason.

    In his final speech Huber said:

    "What I intended to accomplish was to rouse the student body, not by means of an organization, but solely by my simple words; to urge them, not to violence, but to moral insight into the existing serious deficiencies of our political system. To urge the return to clear moral principles, to the constitutional state, to mutual trust between men."

    For this they were all sentenced to death.

    Justizpalast Justizpalast from Karlsplatz
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Statue of a Wild Boar.

    by IreneMcKay Written Aug 10, 2013

    There is a statue of a wild boar outside the entrance of the German Hunting and Fishing Museum. You will find it if you walk along the Neuhauserstrasse from Karlsplatz to Marienplatz. It is considered to be lucky to rub its nose.

    Wild boar.
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Surfing in English Park: For the Skilled & Nimble

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Feb 20, 2013

    A little far from the coast of Southern Spain or the Atlantic but where is a wave there is a will. Situated at the beginning of the artificial creek that runs through English Garden a constant wave is created by an underwater mechanism. The wave is large enough that most days from Spring to late Fall there are a group of young folks out surfing the wave. However the wave's width is small and there are rocks close by, so I would only recommend this for the most skilled and nimble.

    It is a great place however to sit or stand and watch the surfers hone their skills. A large group of onlookers is always on hand to record the event by either a camera or a video recorder

    Boarding in English Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Kunstareal

    by mindcrime Written Feb 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kunstareal is the art district of Munich located a few block north of the main train station. Every art lover will get excited there as there are several small galleries but also three different Picture Galleries (Alte Pinakothek, Neue Pinakothek, Pinkakothek der Moderne), a glyptothek, the State Collection of Antiques, Brandhorst Museum (modern art collection), Lenbachhaus (housing City’s gallery) and since 2013 the Egyptian Art museum !!!

    From the train station we walked up Luisenstrasse until we reached Konigsplatz where actually the art district begins. There is a big gate (pic 1) in neo classical style that was popular during 19th century when a revival of ancient greek and rome style happened in architecture, literature, theatre etc The gate was designed in doric style in 1862 and was named Propylaea like the entrance of the Acropolis in Athens! Many will be surprised by the interior of this monumental gate as it is full of greek names written with greek letters on the inner walls (pic 3). All of them fought for Greek War of Independence against the Ottoman Empire in 1821.

    Of course it would make sense if you knew that King Ludwig I of Bavaria was in love with Ancient Greece and is said to have declared:”I will not rest until Munich looks like Athens”! The gate was created as a memorial for the accession to the throne of Otto of Greece (1815-1867, son of King Ludwig I of Bavaria), who became the first king of Greece 4 years after the revolution (so the greeks got rid of the ottomans only to find out that the Great Powers had put another foreign ruler above them!). One funny thing is that Otto was only 17 years old!! He was very unpopular among the greeks of course as he was just a monarch although he was forced for a constitution in 1843. He was deposed in 1862, the year that this gate was erected in Munich! Apart from the greek names inside the Gate you can Ionic columns (pic 2) and many reliefs and sculptures.

    On both sides of Konigsplatz there is a museum, on the left is the Glyptothek (pic 4) that was built in 1816 in neoclassical style with Ionic columns on the portico and 18 original greek and roman sculptures on 3 main sides. Although the museum was fully built of marble it was destroyed during WWII and of course the reconstruction used way cheaper material (red brick etc). The museum was built to house the collection of Greek and Roman sculpture of King Ludwig I. Its collection covers a wide period from 490BC to 550AD.

    Opposite the Glyptothek is State Collections of Antiques(Staatliche Antikensammlungen) that houses greek, etruscan and roman art. It was built in 1848 with corinthian columns in front.
    Both museum are open Tuesday to Sunday 10.00-17.00 (Thursday till 20.00) and the entrance fee is 3,5euro (5,5euro for the combo ticket)

    Propylaea of Konigsplatz! Glyptothek State Collections of Antiques
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Bus tour

    by iaint Written Jan 9, 2013

    Not something I've done often. I prefer wandering around to see the sights.

    We made this exception for the benefit of my 18 y-o son, on his first visit to the city. We didn't have a huge amount of time, so an hour being driven around and having it all explained was ideal.

    It worked. He enjoyed it. So did I.

    The "red bus" company runs 3 routes, and we just took the city centre one. Another company - the "blue bus" one may offer alternatives. They both start outside the central railway station. As usual with these trips, you can get off at any of the stops, see what you want to see, and then get on the next bus.

    €14 per person. You buy the ticket from the shop beside the bus stop - you can't pay on the bus.

    top deck Marienplatz
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Walking the Central City

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Dec 30, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The fact that Munich is both compact and flat makes it an ideal place to walk without problems. Most of the more interesting sites are located close to the City Center.

    Munich seems to hold a surprise around every corner. Magnificent commercial buildings, churhces, schools and public markets some of which survived the bombings of World War 2 and others that have been rebuilt appear constantly. Even some of the old City gates have been restored. After walking in English Park or in the Central Park it is only a matter of minutes before an inviting pub appears. So my suggestion is walk around and get lost in this exciting and fun city.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • adema29's Profile Photo

    Munich’s streets

    by adema29 Written Sep 23, 2012

    Coming from a country as mine (!), it is not so difficult to suddenly become a fan of the Munchen’s streets.
    You can actually spend days at a terrace just enjoying the minute to minute street’s show which is amazing.
    Just try to take a look at my pictures and “waste” few minutes from your life enjoying the people passing or singing or dancing or sharing hugs .

    Street view in Munich Street view in Munich

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Antikensammlung

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 26, 2012

    The building was constructed as direction of King Ludwig in 1848, and the artworks are the assemblage of collections of Wittelsbachs and many more. The collections are of Roman, Etruscan, and Greek art. The variety includes plates, antique vases and vials, gol, silver, jewelry, coins and more. Loeb of investment banking house donated his collection of many old/antique urns and containers and sarcophogas.
    It is opposite the Glyptothek on Brienner St in the art district. Open daily and the fee is 4 Euro

    View of the building front View of plates and statuary
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Munich Hotels

See all 434 Hotels in Munich

Latest Munich Hotel Reviews

Easy Palace City Hostel
118 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 3, 2014
Apart Hotel Munchen Sendling
105 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 27, 2014
A&O Hotel Bayerstrasse
79 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 20, 2014
Platzl Hotel
657 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 7, 2014
Hotel Vier Jahreszeiten Kempinski Munchen
426 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 6, 2014
Astor Hotel
42 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 5, 2014
Leonardo Hotel & Residence Munich
209 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 8, 2014
Hilton Park Munich
484 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 6, 2014
Germania Hotel
145 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 3, 2014
Hilton Munich City
990 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 8, 2014
Rilano 24/7 Hotel Munich
76 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 30, 2014
Etap Hotel Munchen City
32 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 28, 2014
Mark Hotel
233 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 8, 2014
Holiday Inn Munich City Centre
789 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 7, 2014
Hotel Munchner Kindl
65 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 2, 2014

Instant Answers: Munich

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

81 travelers online now

Comments

Munich Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Munich locals.
Map of Munich