Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich

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  • Pinakothek der Moderne
    by violett
  • Pinakothek der Moderne
    by violett
  • Pinakothek der Moderne
    by violett
  • paoseo's Profile Photo

    PINAKOTHEK DER MODERNE

    by paoseo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It opened in 2002 as one of the world’s largest museums of modern art and as the complement of the other 2 pinakotheks, the neue (new)and the alte(old). It is divided in 3 floors and houses paintings from cubism(some works of Picasso for istance), to Pop art, minimal art. There are also collections of sculpture, design, drawings and photography
    There is onlt a thing I didn’t like: It costs almost the double than the other 2 pinakothek. It costs something as 9 euro.
    I liked the fact that you can leave all your stuff in lockets. You put in the locket a 2euro coin and when you put in the key you have your coin back, so it is free and this is not so common in italy. It’s very nice visiting museums feeling totally free.
    It is open: 10am-5pm(Tuesday, Wednesday,Saturday, Sun);10am-8pm (Thu-Fri)

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    Pinakothek Der Moderne

    by poons Written Mar 12, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Art, works on paper, architecture and design.

    Classed as one of the worlds greatest collections of 20th & 21st century art.

    The building itself is a must see - never mind the collections inside.

    Be prepared for a total overload - and ensure you set aside a good 5-6 hours to view it fully. I suggest a break in their nice Cafe/Bistro Bar.

    9.5 Euros Adult admission. Check your coat etc in at the Wardrobe when you enter.

    They also have 2 Temporary Exhibition rooms - whilst we were there we had the fortune of catching an exhibition by photographer Nobuyoshi Araki of Tokyo. An interesting mixture of pairing street scenes with women in erotic poses. Hmmm.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Pinakothek der moderne

    by 15ilikestuff Updated Jan 7, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Artwork on display

    This is Munich's biggest modern art collection and its newest. Located next to the Altes Pinakothek and Neues Pinakothek, one can grab a pass to see them all for under twenty bucks! (Or you can visit them Sunday for free). If you REALLY love modern art than you should make a stop here. If you are an art lover as a whole, perhaps one of the other two museums are better, as this modern art museum doesn't hold too many "famous and amazing pieces." The exhibits are interesting (as you would expect of a modern art museum), but it is not one of the best ones in the world. Nevertheless, I enjoyed my visit.

    PS: Tell me what you think about the room containing nothing more than 2 pink strinks hanging from the ceiling to the floor.

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    Pinakothek der Moderne

    by wrongbus Written Sep 26, 2004

    The Pinakothek der Moderne which opened in 2002 may not have garnered the column inches of the Tate Modern or had cultural tourists digging out their passports like the Guggenheim in Bilbao but it did gather more visitors in the first week – 300,000 - than any gallery before it.

    There is such a lightness in the design of the you would think the architect Stephan Braunfels had discovered some hitherto-unknown property of simple concrete. Diagonal walkways lead to a 90 foot rotunda flooded with light from a glass dome. Pure cube-like galleries, uncluttered by the paraphernalia of picture-hangings, fire extinguishers, air conditioning or security systems, allow you to gaze at the work undistracted.

    Light is the most important element in a gallery and, even though forty per cent of the museum is below ground level, this is a daylight museum which even had its own “daylight planner” Hanns Freymuth in construction to supervise the recessed ceiling installations.

    Braunfels gave me a valuable piece of advice before toured the building. “Wherever you walk always turn back, always look behind”. I did and often saw another unexpected slant on his building, another soft curve disappearing into a pale pool of concrete or just a remarkable axis of angles.

    The gallery houses pictures by Dali, Picasso, Warhol and Bacon. Most notable amongst the sculptures – and, incidentally it was the Pinakothek’s first work of art - is the End of The 20th Century by Joseph Beuys, an apparently random arrangement of forty four basalt columns sprawled across Room 20, representing the communicative capacity of nature. Are these things listening to us? Can we understand what they say? Are you talking to me

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