Residenz, Munich

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  • Residenz
    by littleman
  • Residenz
    by littleman
  • Residenz
    by littleman
  • Sunshine64's Profile Photo

    Tour the Residenz

    by Sunshine64 Written Oct 10, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Antiquitarium in the Residenz
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    This wasn't part of our orignal plan, but we had a rainy day and needed indoor activities. Glad we did it. The Residenz was the Wittlesbach's family palace. They ruled Bavaria for over 700 years. Mad King Ludwig's funeral was held in the ground floor chapel.

    We took the self-guided afternoon tour. It's so big, different rooms are open in the morning and afternoon. Luckily my guide book had a lot of information about the rooms. The areas I liked most were the private chapel of Maximillian I, the Antiquitarium and the Shell Grotto.

    Oh, and the Halls of Nibelungen, whose mytholigical scenes were the basis for Wagner's "Der Rings des Nibelungen" are open to all, free of charge.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    the residenz

    by doug48 Written Sep 27, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    max joseph platz

    this palace was home to bavarian rulers from 1385 to 1918. this impressive building that stands today was built by the wittelsbachs between 1570 and 1620. the residenz was badly damaged by allied bombs in WWII but was carefully reconstructed between 1950 and 1960. the residenz houses two interesting museums, the residenz museum and the egyptian art museum. the residenz is located on max joseph platz.

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    Residenz Museum

    by travelfrosch Updated Aug 24, 2006

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    Royally Lavish Environs
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    A fine diversion on a rainy day is the Residenz Museum. The Residenz was home of the Bavarian Dukes and Kings starting in 1508, continuing until King Ludwig III was overthrown at the close of the First World War. You can admire the splendor of fine art, gold-encrusted furniture, and lavish throne rooms. It seems that each successive Duke added on extra throne rooms, bedrooms, etc, so the tour can get a bit repetitive after a while. Note also that this building was severely bombed during the Second World War; much of what you see has been restored.

    The Museum is open daily, 9AM-6PM 1 April - 15 October, 10AM-4PM 16 October - 31 March.

    Admission to the Residenz or the Treasury is EUR 6. Admission to both is EUR 9. Entrance to the Allerheiligen-Hofkirche and the Court Garden is free. Certain people and students can get "Reduced" admission (EUR 5 / 8) or free admission. Check the website for details.

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    Residence Museum

    by poons Updated Mar 12, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bodx admiring the Antiquariam(hall of Antiquities)
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    Wow.... elaborate residence of the Bavarian Kings from 1806 - 1918.

    5 Euros adult entrance. Need a good half day here at least.

    I originally just came in for a warm, but found it is definitely worth a look.

    Fascinating written information on each of the rooms.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Cuvillies-Theater

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 8, 2006

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    Cuvillies-Theater
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    This rococo opera house was first built from 1751 to 1755. There were performances here, with only a few interruptions, until 1944, when the entire interior was removed and taken to two sites outside Munich for safe keeping and storage – just in time, because the remaining outside walls were destroyed in the bombings shortly thereafter.

    After the war a new theater was built on the old foundations. The old Cuvillies Theater, without its exterior walls, was reassembled a short distance away in the Apothecary's court of the Residenz in its original rococo style, without any changes.

    Until recently this theater was used regularly for smaller opera productions, but it is now closed because renovation work is needed on the balconies and especially the wiring and stage machinery, which essentially has not been updated since 1948. You can still go in and have a look, for EUR 3.00, but from 2005 to 2008 it will probably be closed entirely for renovation.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Residenz

    by antistar Written Nov 28, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Residenz, Munich
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    If the many palaces and castles of the Wittelsbach family were not enough, they had this: their ancestral home. The Residenz was the official home of the Dukes and Duchesses of Bavaria for centuries, from its creation in 1385 to their abdication and Bavaria's induction into the Weimar Republic in 1918. Now it is home to a museum that shows off their vast treasures, both in art and architecture. The building itself is a vast exhibition of contrasting styles, but with a Renaissance flavour very much in evidence, especially on the north side facing the Hofgarten.

    The building and museum can be accessed via two tours, one starting in the morning and one starting in the afternoon. I think you can also go on your own, but I am not 100% certain about this as I couldn't confirm it. Even if you can go on your own, I'm not sure if everything in the Residenz would be free to wander in. You can enter the palace from Max-Joseph-Platz, on the south side, or you can wander freely through the courtyards, gardens and squares that surround it.

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  • Johnscarroll's Profile Photo

    A Huge Palace

    by Johnscarroll Written Nov 5, 2005

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    Residenz Exterior
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    This place is so large, they can only staff half of it at one time. So, certain rooms are open for tours in the morning, and then a somewhat different set of rooms in the afternoon. We enjoyed the morning tour so much, we decided to stick around for the afternoon tour as well. Gardens, chapels, state rooms, bedrooms - they are all here, and restored after the complete destruction dealt by American and British bombs during World War II.

    Pictures and video are aloud, as long as you don't use flash. Located in an adjacent wing are the Bavarian crown treasures (aka crown jewels). It's a spectacular collection that my partner found especially enthralling. We spent five hours going through all the public rooms in the palace, as well as the royal theatre and the treasure exhibits.

    Finally, a few small areas include exhibitions of palace photos during the restoration, including photos taken shortly after the war - showing the utter and complete destruction.

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  • Yorick12's Profile Photo

    Residenz

    by Yorick12 Updated Oct 25, 2005
    Residenz courtyard

    This old Bavarian palace is just beautiful. The original structure dates from the 14th century. Although it was greatly demanged during WWII, they have done a great job repairing it and returning it to it's former splendor. It's huge and there is more than one tour you can take. We went through the living quaters, but they also have a treasury of crowns and jewels on display which we opted not to take that tour as well. Make sure not to miss the antiquarium, it's awesome.

    open daily: April-October 15th 9am - 6pm, October 16th-March 9am - 4pm
    Free Audio-Guide available in German, English, Italian, French and Spanish

    Admission charges
    6,- euros regular
    Combination ticket "Residence Museum and Treasury "
    9,- euros regular

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  • TempNomad's Profile Photo

    Make sure it will be open!

    by TempNomad Written Aug 4, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the outside looking in.

    One of my two biggest disappointments in Munich was not being able to visit the Residenz. (The other was missing out on the Alte Pinokotech.) I had seen photos of the interior, and I also liked the story that went with the place. Ah well, there was a big affair getting set up and no one was allowed in for security reasons.

    Anyway, please go visit it for me! Wander about in the grand opulence of the place and look at a few especially lovely things twice as long as you would have, just so I can live it vicariously.

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Surprisingly beautiful! Beauty within!

    by Roeffie Updated Jun 15, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Residenz

    From the outside it is not a particular beautiful building, but when you go in you see that often the outside doesn't really give you an idea of the inside.

    It is astonishing! The costs of restoring it after WW II had to be enormous. Beautiful ceilings, floors, doors paintings etc.

    If you are in Munich you have to see this!

    Opening Hours:
    April - 15.October: 9.00-18.00 hrs.
    16. Oct. - March: 10.00-16.00 hrs.
    on daily basis.

    Admission:
    Adults: € 9,00 in combination with Schatzkammer.

    Ther are free audio tours available in English, French, Italian en German.

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    The Residenzes Treasury!

    by Roeffie Written Jun 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Schatzkammer

    Schatzkammer der Residenz

    All kinds of valueables like crowns, glassworks, gold, gemstone artifacts etc. Beautiful pieces of art. Audio tours available for free in several languages.

    Admission
    Adults € 9,00 (in combination with Residenz)

    Opening Hours
    10:00-16:30 daily

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    A MUST SEE!

    by Hosell Updated Apr 6, 2005

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    If you comes to Munich with a few days,a must see in the city is the area called:THE RESIDENZ.
    This huge area of the city consist in a complex of palaces and some courtyards.Now mostly of all these nice buildings are some good museums and it worth a visit.You'll need a full day to see the best places to see in the Residenz.

    Unfortunatelly we didn't had the time to see any of the interesting museums and other buildings on this area,just a short walk for the exterior of Residenz and the Opera House.Hope to see them much better on my next visit to Munich!.

    Here I will tell you some of best places that you can see at Residenz :

    Halls of Nibelungen
    Rich Chapel
    Steinzimmer
    Schatzkammer (Treasury)
    Cuvillies- Theater and a few more.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Residenz Palace

    by smschley Updated Mar 19, 2005

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    In 1385 the ruling Wittelsbach family decided to erect the Residenz Palace as the Alter Hoof had become too small for their needs. The palace grounds include numerous grottoes, courtyards, fountains, a medicine room, chapel and a fountain. The Wittelsbach family t ruled Bavaria from 1240 until 1918 and acquired tremendous wealth and possessions. Their collections were opened to the public in 1920.

    There are 2 parts to this museum: the Treasury and the Residenz Palace itself. Some pieces were lost through war, but others were gained the same way. Among the treasures is the crown of Anne of Bohemia who was the 1st wife of King Richard II of England. There is an unbelievable bejeweled reliquary of St George and the Dragon which is enameled gold covered with emeralds, rubies, diamonds and pearls. family amongst others, slayed the dragon. There is one whole room full of crowns, orbs, scepters and 2 cases full of medals encrusted with every imaginable gem.

    The Residenz itself is more than 100 rooms. The main attraction of the Residenz is the décor of the rooms. Arrows will point you along the route. The Hall of Antiquities has more than 300 busts that survived from the late sixteenth century. Several throne rooms are still intact as are formal bedrooms of diver’s rulers and their spouses. One of the most impressive rooms is the Kaisersaal (Imperial Hall). It is a hall 34 meters long with a richly decorated gilded ceiling with numerous large painting and tapestries on both the walls and the ceiling. Much of the art in the Residenz is original as most items were removed for safe storage during the war. The Rich Rooms are named for the extravagant Rococo style that was popular around 1700. During this period the Wittelsbachs were rich and flaunting it with expensive decorations in a small room called the Mirror Cabinet the reflections of several mirrors create the illusion of a long elegant passage.

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  • chuying's Profile Photo

    Palace of Bavarian rulers

    by chuying Written Feb 13, 2005

    Residenz, palace of Bavarian rulers (begun 1335) extended by each. Much is museum now. It has seven lovely courtyards, individually named. Its Herkulessaal is considered finest concert hall in Munich (i didn't go inside but only looked through the postcards)

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  • 15ilikestuff's Profile Photo

    Residenz: Product of the disguntingly rich

    by 15ilikestuff Written Jan 7, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Exterior

    The Residenz is a grand palace in the heart of Munich. Though this building looks old, it is not original and was nearly fully rebuilt 30 years ago! There is some replica furniture, along with some pieces from the 19th century (though not necessarily originally in the Residenz). The rooms are huge and after a while they begin to blend together. Though it is impressive, I have been told Schloss Nymphenberg is the better of the two local palaces (though Nymphenberg is a bit out of town). Basically, the Residenz is nice but if you're only in Munich for a short while, there might be other places to spend your time (you can make it through the palace in an hour). However, DO NOT miss the seperate treasury (a different fee), which is truly amazing. You'll see some of the biggest precious stones in the world. Highlights include the "honor medals" made solely of diamonds, rubies, and emeralds, the diamond tierra, and St. George slaying the Dragon (a masterpiece of precious stones). The only other treasury in the world that has been this impressive are the crown jewels in London

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