Residenz, Munich

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  • Residenz
    by littleman
  • Residenz
    by littleman
  • Residenz
    by littleman
  • dietzdrummer's Profile Photo

    Residenz

    by dietzdrummer Written May 11, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Centaur in garden

    This was the residence of the dukes and kings of Bavaria from the 15th century until 1908. Many mixtures of styles as it was changed thru out the ages. The ballroom has a beautiful vaulted ceiling which I could not begin to describe. Leave about 3 hours to tour the facility and the museum.
    Open 9am-6pm daily.

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  • Residenz

    by sabsi Updated Aug 19, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Residenz M��nchen

    The Residenz must be one of the biggest buildings in Munich. It actually consists of several buildings - all with beautiful facades and probably an interesting interieur as well. In here you will find several yards, museums and even a theatre.

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    A MUST SEE!

    by Hosell Updated Apr 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you comes to Munich with a few days,a must see in the city is the area called:THE RESIDENZ.
    This huge area of the city consist in a complex of palaces and some courtyards.Now mostly of all these nice buildings are some good museums and it worth a visit.You'll need a full day to see the best places to see in the Residenz.

    Unfortunatelly we didn't had the time to see any of the interesting museums and other buildings on this area,just a short walk for the exterior of Residenz and the Opera House.Hope to see them much better on my next visit to Munich!.

    Here I will tell you some of best places that you can see at Residenz :

    Halls of Nibelungen
    Rich Chapel
    Steinzimmer
    Schatzkammer (Treasury)
    Cuvillies- Theater and a few more.

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  • DirtyRudy's Profile Photo

    Treasury at the Munich Residenz

    by DirtyRudy Written Jul 11, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Family Jewels of King Rudy the Dirty

    While you're at the Residenz in Munich, don't forget to check out the Treasury. It's filled with jewels, gems, bangles, baubles, and beads. The crown, shown here in this picture, actually belongs to yours truly, his majesty King Rudy the Dirty. Well, I used to own it until I lost it in a poker game to "za Bavarians"!

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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

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  • Henkster's Profile Photo

    The incredible Royal Residence of Bavaria

    by Henkster Written May 1, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    over 100 maginficent rooms can be visited

    Munich's royal palace began as a small castle in the 14th century. The Wittelsbach dukes moved here when the tenements of an expanding Munich encroached upon their Alter Hof. In succeeding centuries the royal residence developed according to the importance, requirements, and interests of its occupants. The Wittelsbachs were deposed in 1918, but their accumulated treasures are on view in several palace museums.

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    Residenz

    by acemj Updated Aug 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you like grandeur and architecture, you might consider a tour of the Residenz, the former family palace of the Wittelsbachs, who ruled Bavaria for more than 700 years. The palace is beautiful from the outside, but I didn't do the tour. I read that there are no English translations, so I decided to spend my time doing something that I would be able to learn more from (like drinking another beer).

    The palace was damaged during bombing in World War II, but has been reconstructed and offers self-guided tours in the morning and afternoon. There is a room called the Shell Grotto which was completely destroyed during the war and because the people didn't have the money to buy the proper materials to reconstruct it to its exact original form, they instead gathered and used shells from the Bavarian shores to rebuild it.

    €5, combo-ticket for Residenz and treasury-€8.50

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Residenz

    by Nemorino Updated Oct 18, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Cyclists in the Residenz
    3 more images

    The Munich Residence is a complex of buildings and courtyards that was the home of the Wittelsbach dynasty of dukes, electors and finally kings of Bavaria from 1385 to 1918, when the last Wittelsbach ruler was deposed. There are over 130 rooms representing many different styles and eras.

    The Residenz is of course included in Munich's ever-popular cycling tours, as shown in the first photo.

    Second photo: Apothekenhof.

    Third photo: Grottenhof.

    Fourth photo: One of the many rooms in the Residenz.

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    • Cycling
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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    Cuvillies-Theater

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 8, 2006

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    Cuvillies-Theater
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    This rococo opera house was first built from 1751 to 1755. There were performances here, with only a few interruptions, until 1944, when the entire interior was removed and taken to two sites outside Munich for safe keeping and storage – just in time, because the remaining outside walls were destroyed in the bombings shortly thereafter.

    After the war a new theater was built on the old foundations. The old Cuvillies Theater, without its exterior walls, was reassembled a short distance away in the Apothecary's court of the Residenz in its original rococo style, without any changes.

    Until recently this theater was used regularly for smaller opera productions, but it is now closed because renovation work is needed on the balconies and especially the wiring and stage machinery, which essentially has not been updated since 1948. You can still go in and have a look, for EUR 3.00, but from 2005 to 2008 it will probably be closed entirely for renovation.

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    • Theater Travel
    • Music
    • Architecture

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Residence

    by Sjalen Written Nov 11, 2004

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    A definite must. At first we though this old Wittelsbach power centre from 1570 (when the famous Bavarian rulers first moved here from the Old Town) and onwards would look quite reconstructed since it was heavily damaged in WWII. However, we were amazed at its splendour. You can see both the Treasury and the Palace itself (combined ticket) or just one of them. We had already walked a lot and there are only so many nice buildings a six-year-old can take so we settled for the palace and were not disappointed. You walk around with an audioguide at your leasure and could easily stay the entire day, listening to all comments, but take your pick if you start to feel tired in the feet :) A must see is the Antiquarium, an absolute masterpiece from the first days of the palace, it is a low ceilinged hall decorated in a most wonderful way. It was built to keep the antique collection in (hence its name) but later turned into a hall for various festivities. I also liked the music room and the Trier Hall to name just a few beautiful memories.

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  • dcwizard's Profile Photo

    Residenz: Massive Complex of the Wittelbachs

    by dcwizard Written Feb 29, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Courtyard at Residenz

    The Residenz (Royal Residence) of the Wittelbachs dates back to a small castle with moat built in 1385 with additional sections added over the centuries. Highlights include the magnificent arched Antiquarium, the Wittelsbach treasury on display in the Königsbau (Royal Palace), and the Rococo Cuvilliés Theatre, named for its builder. If you don't have time for a visit, at least wander around its walls and courtyards.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • yashiko's Profile Photo

    The Residenz Palace

    by yashiko Updated Jun 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    statue in the inneryard

    This innercity palace is marvelous. It has all the splendour off the great Bavarian history. One room after another painted in bright collors lined with goldleaf, mirrors 2.5 meters high, fabulous bedrooms decorated with silken sheets, furniture off the best workmanship,... The Residenz has it all. The one thing that it has not are the huge amounts off tourists following a guide who gives hour-long borring speeches. You can discover the place at your own rate. It's also allowed to take pictures .
    So why should we want to go to places like Neuschwanstein?

    Daily open from 9.00 - 18.00, On summer Thursdays open until 20.00

    Tickets: 4€, 7€ for a combo ticket which also includes the treasury at the Residenz.

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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • DirtyRudy's Profile Photo

    Munich Residenz

    by DirtyRudy Written Jul 11, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Halls of Nibelungen

    Munich's Residenz is huge. It'll take you a whole day to get through all of it and read every bit of info, but I didn't have that kind of patience. Touring the palace, you can easily tell that these Bavarian nobles were loaded. My favorite part of the Residenz was "Halls of Nibelungen".

    If you have time, definitely check out the treasury too. Lots of jewelry and shiny stuff that's probably worth a fortune. I'm sure you can steal it if you've got moves like Katherine Zeta Jones in Entrapment!

    Residenz: 5 EUR
    Residenz & Treasury Combo: 8.50 EUR

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Residenz

    by antistar Written Nov 28, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Residenz, Munich
    3 more images

    If the many palaces and castles of the Wittelsbach family were not enough, they had this: their ancestral home. The Residenz was the official home of the Dukes and Duchesses of Bavaria for centuries, from its creation in 1385 to their abdication and Bavaria's induction into the Weimar Republic in 1918. Now it is home to a museum that shows off their vast treasures, both in art and architecture. The building itself is a vast exhibition of contrasting styles, but with a Renaissance flavour very much in evidence, especially on the north side facing the Hofgarten.

    The building and museum can be accessed via two tours, one starting in the morning and one starting in the afternoon. I think you can also go on your own, but I am not 100% certain about this as I couldn't confirm it. Even if you can go on your own, I'm not sure if everything in the Residenz would be free to wander in. You can enter the palace from Max-Joseph-Platz, on the south side, or you can wander freely through the courtyards, gardens and squares that surround it.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Residenz Palace

    by smschley Updated Mar 19, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1385 the ruling Wittelsbach family decided to erect the Residenz Palace as the Alter Hoof had become too small for their needs. The palace grounds include numerous grottoes, courtyards, fountains, a medicine room, chapel and a fountain. The Wittelsbach family t ruled Bavaria from 1240 until 1918 and acquired tremendous wealth and possessions. Their collections were opened to the public in 1920.

    There are 2 parts to this museum: the Treasury and the Residenz Palace itself. Some pieces were lost through war, but others were gained the same way. Among the treasures is the crown of Anne of Bohemia who was the 1st wife of King Richard II of England. There is an unbelievable bejeweled reliquary of St George and the Dragon which is enameled gold covered with emeralds, rubies, diamonds and pearls. family amongst others, slayed the dragon. There is one whole room full of crowns, orbs, scepters and 2 cases full of medals encrusted with every imaginable gem.

    The Residenz itself is more than 100 rooms. The main attraction of the Residenz is the décor of the rooms. Arrows will point you along the route. The Hall of Antiquities has more than 300 busts that survived from the late sixteenth century. Several throne rooms are still intact as are formal bedrooms of diver’s rulers and their spouses. One of the most impressive rooms is the Kaisersaal (Imperial Hall). It is a hall 34 meters long with a richly decorated gilded ceiling with numerous large painting and tapestries on both the walls and the ceiling. Much of the art in the Residenz is original as most items were removed for safe storage during the war. The Rich Rooms are named for the extravagant Rococo style that was popular around 1700. During this period the Wittelsbachs were rich and flaunting it with expensive decorations in a small room called the Mirror Cabinet the reflections of several mirrors create the illusion of a long elegant passage.

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    Luxury for Royals!

    by Bavavia Updated Jun 15, 2009

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    3 more images

    Will take several hours to get through. Self guided tour with an audio device to help you through. Need audio device for palace but no so much for Treasury ( which is an extra cost but worth it).

    9 euros for Residenz and treasury.
    11 euros for above plus the theatre( i didnt go to theatre, it took several hours just to get through the residenz and treasury)

    HOURS OF OPERATION (

    Residenz Museum
    April - 15 October: daily 9am - 6pm (last entry: 5pm)
    16 October - March: daily 10am - 5pm (last entry: 4pm)
    open daily
    Treasury
    April - 15 October: daily 9am - 6pm (last entry: 5pm)
    16 October - March: daily 10am - 5pm (last entry: 4pm)
    open daily

    all the buildings are closed on 1 January, Shrove Tuesday and 24, 25 and 31 December.

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