Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich

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  • Flowers in garden near palace
    Flowers in garden near palace
    by BruceDunning
  • Schloss Nymphenburg.
    Schloss Nymphenburg.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Schloss Nymphenburg.
    Schloss Nymphenburg.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Landotravel's Profile Photo

    V ov VI: Magdalenenklause

    by Landotravel Updated Oct 6, 2010

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    Rickety entrance
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    Another shocking building: a kind of "ruined" small church hidden in the forest. This highly original work is a masterpiece from Joseph Effner and it was expressly built as we can see it: a decaying facade with holes, fissures, broken pieces, etc. as a very old one. It was made within the romantic ideal of a retirement and prayer place for a hermit, lost in the forest.

    Inside, decoration is truely astounding and eclectic: rough walls with sea-shells and stones incrustations, small figures emerging from it, arcades similar to those of latter art-noveau, etc. You feel inmersed in a strange fairy-tale world or in a kind of nightmare, as you prefer. Rare and precious, dark and coloured, frightening and brilliant, everything alike, you do not know if it's the work of an insane mind or a genius. You have to see it to decide and it's sure you'll never see a place like this one.

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    IV of VI: Badenburg

    by Landotravel Written Oct 5, 2010

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    Parties Hall
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    Here you find another of the masterpieces hidden inside the park at Nimphenburg: the Badenburg or "Bathing House". Yet in XVIIIth century it was considered a true reference and was praised. The entrance is the "Parties Hall" a high and richly orned room with a painted ceilig and stucco all around, a nice and fine art piece. Walking inside you find some nice rooms orned with chinese paintings and silk tapestry at the taste of the moment and, at last, the fabulous "Bath Room", a two level space with the pool itself downstairs and a rich second floor around decorated in marble and with a superb golden railing. An intimate place to take a bath and receive visitors if required.

    Both Amalienburg and Badenburg pavillions were yet considered the "must-see" places two centuries ago. And it's still the same nowadays.

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    III of VI: Amalienburg

    by Landotravel Written Oct 5, 2010

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    The superb Mirrors Hall
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    A 15 minutes walking through the park paths -properly guided by wooden signals- leads you to this astounding pavillion. The simple but smart external sight cannot prepare you for the wild exhuberance inside. Built in the XVIIIth century by genius architect Francois Cuivillé as a hunting pavillion represents one of the most rare and valuable jewels of European Rococo.

    Some nice rooms with built-in wooden cupboards to put weapons and various tools, hunting pictures, portraits of the owners and silk murals in richly decorated walls and roofs lead to a central and fastuous hall: the "Great Hall" or "Mirrors Hall", a symphony of white, silver and glass, a rounded big room with windows opened to the park, big glass walls and a cascade of silver ornaments hanging everywhere to and from the ceilig with leaves and figures which seem to be hanging or floating here and there. Everything is crowded and brighting with silver and you feel surrounded of magnificence. It's a strange and fabulous visual experience. A real unique MASTERPIECE you can't loose.

    - When returnig to the entrance hall, by the tickets place, I remember seein foreign visitors like me buying tickets only for the rooms visit. And then I felt sad for them. I knew they didn't even imagine what they refused to see only to save some money. They were so near from a true art marvel and the didn't know what they were loosing themselves....-

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    II of VI: Marstall museum

    by Landotravel Written Oct 5, 2010

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    At the south part of the palace complex you find what may be perfectly considered as one of the better -if not the best- carriage museums in the world. The collection inside is superb and you will find perfectly preserved some of the most splendid and suntuous horse carriages and sleighs ever. Golden wood, silver harnesses, fairy tale decorations everywhere. Even the most modest ones are a unique representation of the ancient vehicles used in the past centuries.

    There are two large halls and, between both, there is another museum enclosed. Nymphemburg was an important pottery production place so you will find here an important pottery exhibition: the Bäuml collection. It may be something like a small rest between carriages.

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    I of VI - Palace rooms

    by Landotravel Written Oct 5, 2010

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    Front view
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    This famous and important palace complex was built at western Munich in the XVIIth century as a summer palace. Yet at this time it was considered one of the greatest expressions of palace art due not only to the building iself but, especially, by the gardens and pavillions that are, truely, unique in the world and are some really must-see not only at Munich but in the world. That's why I'll try to show its marvels in some different steps.

    When entering the palace, you're asked to choose between the simple visit to the rooms or a more complete selection, including the Marstall museum, the pavillions, etc. At this point please, DO CHOOSE THE COMPLETE VISIT despite of it may take you all the day. It's really worthy because you're about to see some unique marvels ever.

    The main building is the most sober part of the complex but it's nice. From the great "Party Hall" or "Stone Hall" you have the north and south wings to visit. Here you find the audience room, roomms of Karl Theodor, the Queen's room -where the famous Ludwig II was born- or the Beauty room of Ludwig I, unique in the world, full of women portraits showing the female beauty canon of the king: dozens of charming portraits of women of all rank, painted by Joseph Stieler.

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    Nymphenburg

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    park of Nymphenburg

    Nymphenburg is a really impressive palace with a huge garden. An ideal place for strolling on Sunday afternoon. The facade of the palace is longer then the one of Versailles, France and furthermore it is Germany's biggest Baroque castle. It was built in 17th century and was once the summer residence of the Wittelsbach.
    In the ponds of the park you find numerous swans and wild gooses. Because of generous visitors who feed those animals their population has increased very fast. Now it is forbidden tofeed them!

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg castle

    by globetrott Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Nymphenburg castle

    Schloss Nymphenburg was the summer-residence of the Bavarian kings and the birthplace of "mad" king Ludwig II.

    Nymphenburg is one of the most beautiful baroque castles in Europe with a large baroque garden around it.
    You will need the whole day in order to see all the various smaller castles and other places of interest in the large park around the palace of Nymphenburg - you may as well have a look on my seperate page about "Schlosspark Nymphenburg" - just click on my link below !!

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    • Museum Visits
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    • Adventure Travel

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  • kmohandas's Profile Photo

    SCHLOSS NYPHENBERG- A BEAUTIFUL PALACE

    by kmohandas Updated Apr 28, 2009

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    SCHLOSS NYPHENBERG
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    This magnificent palace and surrounding garden right in the heart of the Munich city is one of the most beautiful palaces in the world. The palace was commissioned by the royal couple Ferdinand Maria and Henriette Adelaide. The designer & architect of the palace was Italian architect Agastino Bareli. It was built in 1664 after the birth of the son of the royal couple, Maximilian II Emanuel. The central pavilion was completed in 1675.
    Max Emanuel, the prince of Bavaria, carried out a systematic extension of the palace in 1701. Later two pavilions were added each in the south and north of Barelli's palace by Enrico Zucalli and Giovanni Antonio Viscardi. Subsequently, the south section of the palace was further extended to the court stables. Further, the orangerie was added to the north. Finally, a grand circle with baroque mansions (the Schlossrondell) was erected under Max Emanuel's son Charles Albert. Several others. . For a long time, the palace was the favorite summer residence of the rulers of Bavaria. King Max I Joseph died there in 1825, and his great-grandson King Ludwig II was born there in 1845.
    Later the palce Nymphenburg has been open to the public, but also continues to be a home for the ruler of Bavaria. Today the palace and its garden with marvelous statues are a major tourist attraction.
    Opening hours
    April-15 October: 9 am-6 pm, 16 October-March: 10 am-4 pm
    Closed on: Tuesdays

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Family Travel

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    Nymphenburg Palace

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 27, 2009

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    Nymphenburg Palace

    The Elector Ferdinand Maria of Bavaria had this great palace built, starting in the late 17th century. Additions and modifications continued throughout the 18th century. This was the summer home of the Wittelsbach dynasty that ruled Bavaria. The interior is decorated with beautiful baroque and roccoco artwork. The gardens were laid out in a style resembling Versailles. There are several museums here, which I didn't have time to visit.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • chiara76's Profile Photo

    Castle Nymphenburg. Amalienburg.

    by chiara76 Written Jan 31, 2008

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    Amalienburg.
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    One of the most interesting building located in the area of Nymphenburg is an Amalienburg which was built in years 1734-1739 by Francois Cuvillies. It was a little hunting castle. You can admire an amazing decoration in a rococo's style especially in the ceiling and on the walls of the little castle.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • chiara76's Profile Photo

    Castle Nymphenburg.

    by chiara76 Written Jan 31, 2008

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    Castle Nymphenburg.
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    Castle Nymhenburg (summer residence of Bavarian rulers) is a amazing baroque building which was built since year 1663. Few other parts of it were built even in the beginning of 18th century. It is in the area of big park and garden.
    There is a gallery of art there and also a museum, you can visit the indoors of Nymphenburg. There are also few other interesting building in the area of Nymphenburg like Amalienburg or Magdalenenklause.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Another Beautiful Palace

    by Donna_in_India Written Jan 7, 2008

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    We took a tram to Schloss Nymphenburg, what used to be the summer residence of the royal family. The entranceway with the small lake and large swans set against the palace is really pretty.

    Inside only a few rooms were open to the public, many less than at the Residenz. The first room you enter is the Great Hall. I really loved this room. In all of the palaces we had been to I couldn’t imagine the people who lived there. Everything seemed so formal, so “unfun”. This was the first room where I could picture what it must have been like to have musicians playing and people dancing. Of course, I loved the queen’s bedroom as well.

    In another building near Schloss Nymphenburg was the Marstallmuseum, which housed various royal carriages including a coronation coach, sleighs, and riding equipment. The carriages were gorgeous. They were so elaborate that you couldn’t imagine them being driven.

    There are beautiful gardens around the Palace that are also worth exploring.

    I recommend getting the audioguide so you can go at your own pace.

    Opening hours
    April-15 October:
    9 am-6 pm
    16 October-March:
    10 am-4 pm

    Admission charges
    5 euros regular
    Combination ticket "Nymphenburg"
    Nymphenburg Palace / Park buildings / Marstallmuseum:
    10 euros regular

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  • colin_bramso's Profile Photo

    A stunning palace

    by colin_bramso Written Dec 12, 2007

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    Huge spread-out palace
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    Just to the west of the city is the stunning Nymphenburg Palace, one of the largest in Europe. It's set in 200 acres of beautifully landscaped park & gardens, with a central canal flanked by two lakes.

    The palace dates from 1675, was added to over the centuries since and is stunning both inside and out. Many of the rooms are open to the public, there's a museum of old carriages & coaches and an exhibition of the famous Nymphenburg porcelain.

    The palace is open to the public daily and a combination ticket for entry to the palace, park buildings and museums is Euro10.

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    Marstallmuseum

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 28, 2007

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    4 more images

    At the extreme southern end of the Nymphenburg Palace and basically unvisited, this remarkable museum opened in 1950 in the former royal stables and houses a great collection of royal coaches, sleighs, and harness equipment as well as oil paintings of 28 of Ludwig I favorite horses. The prize is the coronation coach of HRE Karl Albrecht drawn by eight horses ( kings only had 6 ). Mary Amalia's hunting sleigh is included here with Diana on the prow. In the far back room are the spectacular ornate coaches and sleighs of Ludwig II, each inch covered with sculpture and painting. A small carousel occupies one corner of the museum. Sadly, these exhibits are not labelled even in German, detracting from a great experience. The Porcelain Museum is adjacent and one ticket covers both. Note on the 5th image the figure holding aloft the crown. The Wittelsbach dynasty was not known for subtlety.

    The Nymphenburg Travelogue contains more images of the Marstall Museum.

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    Amalienburg - The Kitchen

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 28, 2007

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    One of the most striking rooms in the Nymphenburg complex is the Amalienburg kitchen, covered entirely in blue Delft tile with hand-painted scenes meant to evoke the Orient and also a grouping of flower vases. Europe of the 18th Century was fascinated by all things Chinese. This last room on the tour is one of the most exciting.

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Comments (1)

  • Jan 16, 2013 at 1:16 AM

    The Nymphenburg palace looks so great in the sunshine. We took the hop on hop off to travel there. Or lunch break we took at the Hirschgarden which is near the Nymphenburg palace. There you can see some deer while having some traditional Bavarian food! It was fun!

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