Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich

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  • Flowers in garden near palace
    Flowers in garden near palace
    by BruceDunning
  • Schloss Nymphenburg.
    Schloss Nymphenburg.
    by IreneMcKay
  • Schloss Nymphenburg.
    Schloss Nymphenburg.
    by IreneMcKay
  • poons's Profile Photo

    Nymphenberg Palace

    by poons Updated Mar 13, 2006

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    Beautiful in winter (1)
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    Baroque-style former summer residence of Bavaria’s rulers.

    Didn't get to go in unfortunately, opted for a great winter walk around the Palace Grounds, beautiful grounds they are too. I guess as this was out of season, we found most of the outdoor statues etc. were boxed up for their protection against the elements.

    Because of all the snow I couldn't make out where the land ended and the water began - luckily we came away without a drowning.

    They have a lovely conservatory which serves as a cafeteria - If you have a sweet tooth - GREAT CAKES !

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Amazing Nymphenberg Palace

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Dec 7, 2011

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    Front View of Nymphenburg Palace
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    What struck me first when arriving at Schloss Nymphenburg is the enormity of its width. The palace which began construction in 1664 is now over 700 meters wide. To even get a picture of the entire front baroque facade you practically have to stand back on the street.

    We took the palace and garden tour only. The palace itself contains rooms with styles from three different periods; baroque, rococo, and neoclassical. Some of the ceiling frescos had been well preserved or recreated. One of my favorite rooms which was the Gallery of Beauties in the south pavilion. King Ludwig I had the portriats of all his many affairs hung in this room.

    The park and the garden are worth a long walk. The garden was originally an Italian style garden but was redone in the early 19th century by Prince Charles Theodore. The park is divided by a long canal which begins near the palace and extends out to the statues of the Greek gods.

    We did not tour the carriage house or the factory on the first floor.

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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Another Beautiful Palace

    by Donna_in_India Written Jan 7, 2008

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    We took a tram to Schloss Nymphenburg, what used to be the summer residence of the royal family. The entranceway with the small lake and large swans set against the palace is really pretty.

    Inside only a few rooms were open to the public, many less than at the Residenz. The first room you enter is the Great Hall. I really loved this room. In all of the palaces we had been to I couldn’t imagine the people who lived there. Everything seemed so formal, so “unfun”. This was the first room where I could picture what it must have been like to have musicians playing and people dancing. Of course, I loved the queen’s bedroom as well.

    In another building near Schloss Nymphenburg was the Marstallmuseum, which housed various royal carriages including a coronation coach, sleighs, and riding equipment. The carriages were gorgeous. They were so elaborate that you couldn’t imagine them being driven.

    There are beautiful gardens around the Palace that are also worth exploring.

    I recommend getting the audioguide so you can go at your own pace.

    Opening hours
    April-15 October:
    9 am-6 pm
    16 October-March:
    10 am-4 pm

    Admission charges
    5 euros regular
    Combination ticket "Nymphenburg"
    Nymphenburg Palace / Park buildings / Marstallmuseum:
    10 euros regular

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  • yashiko's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg Palace

    by yashiko Written Jun 20, 2004

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    Nymphenburg swans

    The former summer residence of the rulers of Bavaria is located in the west part of the city in the middle of one of Munich's most beautiful parks. Five generations of Wittelsbach rulers were involved in the construction of this Baroque castle.
    The building of Nymphenburg Castle began in the reign of the Elector Ferdinand Maria: overjoyed by the birth of his son and heir, Max Emanuel, he had the central section built for his wife in the style of an Italian villa (Agostino Barelli, 1664-74). In about 1700, Max Emanuel commissioned Enrico Zuccali and Antonio Viscardi to extend the castle by adding galleries and pavilions.

    Opening hours
    April-15 October:
    9 am-6 pm
    16 October-March:
    10 am-4 pm
    Open daily

    Admission charges
    regular: 5 euros
    reduced: 4 euros
    combination ticket "Nymphenburg Palace, Park buildings, Marstallmuseum and Porcelain Museum"
    regular: 10 euros
    reduced: 8 euros

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    NYMPHENBURG CASTLE

    by Hosell Written Apr 2, 2005

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    As I said on page intro,we arrived Munich at lunchtime,after having a very nice meal in a restaurant in the downtown (see my restaurant tip for more info),we started a very good guided tour in the city.

    Unfortunatelly my visit to this amazing city wasn't very long just that full day,also we had booked a room in a hotel in the city.
    We started our tour in Munich at Schloss Nymphenburg or Nympherburg Castle.We spent about two hours visiting this beautiful palace.It was built in 1.664 to 1.728 and was used as Summer Residence of Bavarian Kings-.

    The Nympherburg Castle is without any doubts one of most beautiful Baroque Palaces in Europe.Don't miss also a visit to the wonderful gardens,fountains and if you have time enough during your visit there,don't hesitate to take a look to the Porcelain Factory,located just next to the palace and founded in 1.747.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Marstallmuseum

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 28, 2007

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    At the extreme southern end of the Nymphenburg Palace and basically unvisited, this remarkable museum opened in 1950 in the former royal stables and houses a great collection of royal coaches, sleighs, and harness equipment as well as oil paintings of 28 of Ludwig I favorite horses. The prize is the coronation coach of HRE Karl Albrecht drawn by eight horses ( kings only had 6 ). Mary Amalia's hunting sleigh is included here with Diana on the prow. In the far back room are the spectacular ornate coaches and sleighs of Ludwig II, each inch covered with sculpture and painting. A small carousel occupies one corner of the museum. Sadly, these exhibits are not labelled even in German, detracting from a great experience. The Porcelain Museum is adjacent and one ticket covers both. Note on the 5th image the figure holding aloft the crown. The Wittelsbach dynasty was not known for subtlety.

    The Nymphenburg Travelogue contains more images of the Marstall Museum.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Wittelsbach Summer Palace

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 20, 2007

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    Three miles north of Munich center, this huge Baroque palace was commissioned by Elector Ferdinand Maria as a gift to his consort Henriette Adelaide of Savoy after the birth of a son and heir to the Wittelsbach dynasty in 1664. The rectangular central section was completed in 1675 in the style of an Italian Villa. The heir, Max Emanuel, added 4 large pavilions also in the Italianate style, but later additions over 100 years were more Baroque and gradually the palace was made over. The grand circle ( Schlossrondel) was added by HRE Charles VII Albert. The court stables were added in 1715 and further predominantly interior renovations were later made by Elector Max III Joseph and the Kings Ludwig I and II.
    The 200 acre park, originally Italian in style, was redesigned as an English garden in the early 19th Century, but the long central canal and lakes were preserved. Numerous pavilions were scattered throughout the park including the most famous Amalienburg.
    The palace today offers 16 rooms for public view but remains the home of the head of the Wittelsbach family, now a commoner but still called HRH Franz, Duke of Bavaria.

    VISITING THE PALACE --- The Nymphenberg Palace is best seen as an individual visitor, easily accessed from Stachus and the main train station on tram 17 offering a nice glimpse of modern Munich along the way. There is then a long one block walk along the tree shaded canal which extends 2 km into central Munich and the adjacent street to the Grand Circle and around to the entrance, a lovely 10 minute walk. We observed the tour busses dropping their sheep for a 20 minute visit to two or three rooms in the main palace and gone again - NOT the right way to visit this this world class complex. At the corner of the tram stop for the return is a delightful little cafe and bakery shop with a largely local clientele and a nice assortment of excellent pastries and good coffee.

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  • chiara76's Profile Photo

    Castle Nymphenburg.

    by chiara76 Written Jan 31, 2008

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    Castle Nymphenburg.
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    Castle Nymhenburg (summer residence of Bavarian rulers) is a amazing baroque building which was built since year 1663. Few other parts of it were built even in the beginning of 18th century. It is in the area of big park and garden.
    There is a gallery of art there and also a museum, you can visit the indoors of Nymphenburg. There are also few other interesting building in the area of Nymphenburg like Amalienburg or Magdalenenklause.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg Castle & park: great for morning walks

    by Trekki Updated Aug 4, 2013

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    For the time being I can’t write much about the castle itself or its interior, because I was here only briefly, for an early Sunday morning walk with Richie. But this is something I enjoyed very much, so that’s my suggestion:
    On a sunny morning anytime of the year go there as early as possible to have advantage of the lovely morning light setting and of an almost empty park. Don’t enter through one of the side gates but from the east, with full view of the castle itself (see here, panorama of the castle). This is where you will arrive when you take the streetcar no 17 (get off “Schloß Nymphenburg”) and walk along the little canal that ends at the outer castle pond. We were only in the southern park but I really loved it. And of course with Richie being a good guide, I saw all the little bits and pieces of buildings hidden in the forest.

    For a park plan, click => here. That’s the castle website with more information about the park and the buildings, in English.

    Directions:
    This depends how and from where you arrive. We came by bus no. 51 from Laim. For details see => park website “how to get there”.

    Location of Schloß Nymphenburg (entrance) on Google Maps.

    © Ingrid D., September 2012 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.)

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Budget Travel

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Porcelain Museum

    by nicolaitan Updated Oct 21, 2007

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    The former court riding school and stables at Nymphenburg now houses the chariot museum and the exquisite Bauml porcelain collection. The manufacturing company was founded by Elector Max III Joseph in 1747 and the displays document the beautiful works produced through 1920. In-house porcelain factories were an important accoutrement for German royal families and the Wittelsbachs were no exception in their desire for fit-for-royalty service plates, decorative items, and particularly porcelain miniatures of famous old master paintings. These dinner plate sized reproductions were commissioned by Ludwig I who feared everything from fire destroying the originals to age decreasing the colors. Many of these items can be seen in the Residenz, but the collection assembled by Albert Bauml who supervised the factory in the early 20th Century is as spectacular as any. It emphasizes the early work of Franz Bustelli, one of the earliest and most famous creators. Bauml found the factory falling behind in the style and upgraded the artistry. The factory ( image 4) on the periphery of the palace grounds is currently leased to a Wittelsbach trust by the Bavarian Government.

    Franz Anton Bustelli, Swiss by birth, was a master in porcelain design. He of course made the requisite catholic figures like crucifixions but was far better known for the lively facial expressions and occasional soft-porn figures. The details of movement and the life-like faces we found mesmerizing. This museum is not large but contains some beautiful work.

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    Stone Hall ( Steinemer Saal )

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 20, 2007

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    The most impressive room in the Palace is the central 3 storey Stone Hall used for banquets and celebrations in royal times and now occasionally for concerts. The motif is from Roman mythology, the nymph Flora - goddess of flowers and the spring season. She was not an important player in Roman times ( there were several fertility goddesses available ), but was a popular subject among Renaissance artists. She was associated with renewal of life in the spring ( appropriate for the origin of the palace ) and married to Favonius, the west wind god. The ceiling is covered by frescoes featuring Flora as depicted by the ubiquitous Johann Baptist Zimmerman. Architecture and decoration were by Francois Cuvillies, so important in the Residenz. The center is dominated by a huge chandelier.
    The Stone Hall is a beautiful room, well worth a few minutes of detailed attention. The rear opens up to a vista of the large formal park and canal, the front ( covered on our visit ) faces the ponds.

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    Schloss Nymphenburg

    by dietzdrummer Written May 13, 2004

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    Nymphenburg Palace

    The Nymphenberg Palace was the summer residence of the Wittelsbachs. Construction started in 1664. Barelli and Zucalli, architects also acredited with the construction of Theatinerkirche, were the head architects. Baroque syle, with beautiful gardens and park.

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    The Parks

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 20, 2007

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    The 200 acre Nymphenburg park began as a small garden near Henriette Adelaide's summer cottage and is now comprised of a large English style garden with residual Baroque features and a large wooded area containing scattered pavilions. In 1701 Max Emanuel hired Charles
    Carbonet to create a park in the style of Versailles. He created the great canal which bisects the property and draws water from the Wurm River 2 km away. Other streams and canals were routed through the wooded sections of thepark.
    Court Architect Joseph Effner completed the canal around 1715 and added a number of water features as well as plan the heavily wooded parts of the park. The Large Pool with the statue of Flora and the ornamental flower beds were laid out at this time as well.

    In the late18th Century, English style gardens became the most popular form and Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell was hired to transform the park. He retained the central axis but refined the gardens and paths. He also lowered the fences at the periphery so that the sight lines from the park extended far beyond the property. His plan has remained unchanged to the present time.

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    The Elector's Wing

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 21, 2007

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    The North Wing of Nymphenburg was occupied by the Elector on the summer vacations over several generations. Less opulent than the southern wing, it is noteworthy for wall tapestries from Brussels dating to the early 18th Century (images 1,2). There are two galleries with paintings of women - the Wittlesbachs did love those ladies. Max Emanuel is responsible for the oils of nine women who shared his exile in Paris. Also, from the court of Ludwig XIV, five paintings of women of the court are in another room (image 3). The rich furniture of this wing is depicted on the last photo.

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    The Electress' Wing

    by nicolaitan Written Oct 21, 2007

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    The south wing of Nymphenberg is considerably more famous than the north, mostly because of Ludwig I Gallery of Beauties (Schonheitsgalerie)(images 1,2), oils of 36 beautiful women drawn from all classes ranging from royalty to a shoemaker's daughter. His involvement with Lola Montez, one of the women pictured, led to his abdication during the revolution of 1848. These were painted between 1827-50 by Stieler. The Blue Salon is filled with original furniture dating to 1810 (image 3). The green rooms are the bedrooms of the Electress, dating to Queen Caroline (images 4,5).

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Comments (1)

  • Jan 16, 2013 at 1:16 AM

    The Nymphenburg palace looks so great in the sunshine. We took the hop on hop off to travel there. Or lunch break we took at the Hirschgarden which is near the Nymphenburg palace. There you can see some deer while having some traditional Bavarian food! It was fun!

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