By train, Munich

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    Munich-Pasing Station

    by travelfrosch Updated Mar 31, 2014

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    An S-Bahn at Pasing Station
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    UPDATE: Due to construction, service between downtown and Pasing will be limited late nights and weekends through June 30, 2014. During these times, the inbound S-3 and S-4 will terminate at Pasing, requiring a transfer to Tram #19, another S-Bahn, or local train to get between Pasing and downtown. The S-6 will continue non-stop from Pasing and terminate in the above ground section of the Hauptbahnhof. The S-8 will continue non-stop from Pasing to the Ostbahnhof, then continue service to Munich Airport. A supplemental shuttle train or bus will service intermediate stops between Pasing and the Ostbahnhof every 20 minutes.

    On the west side of Munich is the railway station known as Pasing. Most (but not all) trains arriving from Augsburg, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Weilheim, Kochel, and Buchloe stop here. You can get to Pasing using the S-Bahn lines S-3, S-4, S-6, S-8, or S-20, as well as Tram #19 and various buses. If you plan to stay in the western part of Munich, or one of the western suburbs serviced by the S-Bahn, you can save time by connecting at Pasing instead of the Hauptbahnhof. Conversely, it can make sense to pick up your outbound train at Pasing. Be sure to re-confirm your desired train does indeed stop at Pasing.

    The station itself, while not as vast as the Hauptbahnhof, has a number of services, including food stands, a small grocery store, a few dozen luggage lockers, and an information counter. There are also some vending machines on the train platforms for those in a hurry.

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    München Ostbahnhof

    by travelfrosch Updated Mar 31, 2014

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    A regional train arrives at the Ostbahnhof
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    UPDATE: Due to construction, S-Bahn service between the Ostbahnhof and downtown will be limited late nights and weekends through 30 June 2014. During these times, The S-2, S-3, S-4, and S-7 will terminate at the Ostbahnhof. The S-8 from the Airport will run nonstop between the Ostbahnhof and Pasing and then continue on in the direction of Herrsching. Intermediate S-Bahn stations downtown will be served by shuttle trains departing every 10-20 minutes towards the Hauptbahnhof and/or Pasing. As another alternative, passengers can take the U-5 from the Ostbahnhof downtown in the direction of Laimer Platz, making stops including the Hauptbahnhof and Heimeranplatz (connections to the western branch of the S-7 in the direction of Wolfratshausen).

    Munich's east train station, or Ostbahnhof, is a stopping point for many regional and inter-city trains headed south and east. Most (but not all) trains headed towards Salzburg, Vienna, and Innsbruck stop here. Connections are also possible with some EuroCity trains headed for Italy and the Balkans. In addition, CityNightLine overnight trains towards Berlin and Hamburg originate at the Ostbahnhof, as do various "auto trains." The train station is reachable by several buses, all S-Bahns except S-20, and the U-5.

    For those who are arriving at Munich Airport and heading south or east of Munich, the Ostbahnhof can be a handy connecting point. Take the S-8 from the airport to Ostbahnhof and change to your connecting train. If you're going directly to Salzburg, for example, you can save a lot of money by using a Bayern Ticket, the cost of which ranges from EUR 22 for a single traveler to EUR 38 for 5 people traveling together (not valid on IR, IC, EC, or ICE trains; not valid before 9AM weekdays).

    While the station itself is not as vast as the Hauptbahnhof, you will still find food stands, shops, kiosks, coin-operated luggage lockers, and toilets.

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    A Train Named BOB

    by travelfrosch Updated Dec 17, 2013

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    The BOB ticket counter, Munich Hauptbahnhof
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    The Bayerische Oberlandbahn, or BOB, is a private train service run by Veolia Transport. Departing approximately hourly, BOB trains originate at the Munich Hauptbahnhof and continue to the Tegernsee, Lenggries, and Bayerischzell. (NOTE: outbound trains will split into three parts, one going to each destination. Be sure to get the car going where you want to go!)

    If you get on at the Munich Hauptbahnhof, you must go to tracks 27-36 on the Arnulfstrasse side of the station, about 200 meters down Platform 26. This is probably not the most convenient entry point unless you're right at the Hauptbahnhof. Note that the BOB trains also stop at Donnersbergerbrücke (connections to all S-Bahns except S-20), Harras (connections to S-7, S-27, and U-6), Siemenswerke (weekdays) or Solln (weekends) (connections to S-7, S-20, and S-27), and Holzkirchen (connections to S-3).

    If you have a MVV day card for the entire network (gesamtnetz), it is valid on the segment from Munich to Holzkirchen, meaning you only need a ticket beyond there (i.e., Holzkirchen to your destination). You can purchase tickets at a BOB ticket counter, or at "BOB" ticket machines at the stations. Note machines are touch-screen and in German only. If you purchase a ticket from a machine, be sure to stamp the ticket in one of the machines marked "E" before you board. Note you must stamp a round-trip ticket a second time before boarding your returning train.

    Passes and Special Tickets: Both the Schönes Wochenende Ticket and Bayern-Ticket are valid for the entire route. BOB offers a day ticket called the "Oberland Ticket," valid from 9AM on weekdays or all day on weekends, costing EUR 16 per person. You can also purchase a special "BOB/MVV Ticket" valid on both BOB and the Inner Zone (Innenraum) of the MVV network for up to 5 people from 9AM until closing (EUR 27, or EUR 19 for a "single" ticket). In addition, there is a "Guten Tag" ticket, valid on the BOB as well as MERIDIAN Trains between Munich and Salzburg (not valid weekday mornings before 9AM, cost EUR 17 for one, plus EUR 4 for each additional person up to 5). Eurail / German Rail passes are NOT accepted.

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    Munich Hauptbahnhof

    by travelfrosch Updated Nov 5, 2013

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    An ICE high-speed train arrives
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    Munich's Hauptbahnhof, or main train station, is quite an amazing transportation hub. You can think of it as 4 stations in one: The main tracks for the longer trains (tracks 11-26); two "mini-stations" on either side servicing local trains, private trains (e.g., BOB and ALEX), and some S-Bahns (tracks 5-10 and tracks 27-36); and the underground station ("Hauptbahnhof Tief," Tracks 1-2) for the S-Bahn (S-1 through S-8). You can also get to the Hauptbahnhof by U-Bahn (U-1, U-2, U-4, and U-5), the Lufthansa Airport Bus, and several trams.

    From here, you can get trains to just about anywhere in Europe. Among the destinations reachable via night train: Amsterdam, Berlin, Budapest, Florence, Hamburg, Naples, Paris, Rome, Venice, and Zagreb. UPDATE: The direct night train between Munich and Copenhagen has been discontinued.

    The train station itself has an impressive number of services, to include food stands, a grocery store, a Starbucks, not one but two Burger Kings, luggage lockers, a EURAIDE office, and a full-service travel center ("Reisezentrum" -- go here to validate your railpass).

    The best bet for most local travelers is to use one of the many ticket machines. You can get tickets to most local destinations at one of these, which will save you time waiting in line at a ticket counter. Many machines take major credit cards. Arriving travelers can also buy MVV (local transportation) tickets and day-tickets here, but if a machine is too intimidating, never fear: turn left (with your back to the tracks) and proceed down the escalator. Here, you will find several ticket counters where you can buy any MVV ticket you might need (to include 3-day tickets).

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    S-Bahn

    by iaint Written Apr 23, 2013
    S8 @ Hauptbahnhof
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    This is the suburban railway system.

    Within the city it's quicker than the U-Bahn if the stations suit you.

    I'm not sure how ticketing works - I'm always on a special inclusive Bayern ticket which lets me use the mainline train to/from the city plus the S-Bahn & U-Bahn.

    Two of the S-Bahn lines serve the airport.

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    Munich Hauptbahnhof

    by iaint Updated Apr 23, 2013

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    main concourse

    The main railway station, for those who don't speak German.

    A busy place, but it works well. I'm always comfortable using it.

    Lots of food & shopping outlets. Well signposted. Big information desk right in front of the platforms. Easy connections via the S-Bahn - suburban trains. Not quite so easy connecting to the U-Bahn, but not a big deal.

    Local trains, regional trains, ICE (high speed) trains, international trains...

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    Travel in Bayern region with Bayern ticket

    by agepiroshiki Written Aug 20, 2011

    If you travel in Bayern region, move from one city to another by train and other public transport, Bayern ticket would save you money.

    The price of Bayern ticket is, for single 21 euro, if you are accompanied with up to 4 persons, 29 euro. The ticket is valid from 9 am to 3 am of the next day, on holidays valid from 0 am. You can buy from the vending machine in the train station and metro station in Munich.

    You can use not only trains like regional expresses, s-bahn, but also u-bahn, bus of some of major cities of Bayern region, excluding expresses like ICE, IC.

    For example, the round-trip fare of regional express between Munich and Augsburg is 23.4 euro. So you can save 2.4 euro with Bayern ticket.

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    easy

    by iaint Written May 12, 2011

    We came into the city from Gaimersheim (about 75 minutes north) by DB regional train on a Bayern card.

    I’m not sure of all the details, but as well as covering the train fare it was valid on the s-bahn and u-bahn. I know it’s a day card, and is not valid for use on peak hour trains during the week.

    The DB trains were comfortable, but not very quick. Interchange with the s-bahn and u-bahn at the central station was very easy.

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    Overnight train from Amsterdam to Munich

    by June.b Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I took the overnight train from Amsterdam central station to Munich Hauptbahnhof.

    I booked the couchette online, cost me EUR89. It's a small room with 6 small beds in 3 layers 3 on each side (bottom, mid and upper). The train has toilets on each end of the train carriage. If you booked online, don't forget to print your e-ticket as the inspector comes checking out your ticket along with the credit card that you use to buy the ticket.

    The train left Amsterdam before midnight and arrived very early in the morn in Munich so you sleep and arrive a bit fresh.

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    CityNightLine

    by Sunshine64 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    CityNightLine at the Platform in Amsterdam
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    What an experience to take the night train to from Amsterdam to Munich! Based on VT recommendations, we reserved our sleeping compartment far in advance. There are 3 choices of sleeping cars - couchette, economy, and deluxe. Since I was the only one under 6 ft. in the group, we decided the couchette was a little too small, and went with the economy sleeping car.

    Having never been on a night train before we were not prepared for the cramped quarters. There was nowhere to put our luggage. The description said there was room under the lower bunks for a suitcase. They should say room for a garmet bag. Containing a single suit : ) Honestly, we couldn't even fit a day pack under there. We ended up stacking 2 of the suitcases on top of the "sink", and putting the other two on the floor between the bunks. And I'm not talking about huge, ugly American suitcases, either. OK, maybe one was (not mine).

    And, while we got a good breakfast in the morning, we were never offered any beverages at all. Not even water. This may be entirely normal, but it struck me as odd since A) it was an 11 hour journey and B) many other trains we took had beverage service . There was a bar / dining car, but it was very small and smoky. Luckily we had packed a picnic.

    So, now that I've made it sound horrible, it really wasn't that bad. The bedding was nice. And the 6ft plus guys could almost stretch out in the bunks. And my companions and I are good natured enough to find the humor in the whole situation. We laughed a lot and took a lot of pictures. And it was fun trying to sleep on the train. Oh, and the next day I felt like I was still on the train.

    Anyway, all in all, it was a good $ for a hotel and transportation. But if I had it to do over again, I'd pay the extra $ for the deluxe sleeping car.

    As with other train reservations, your tickets tells you which car and which comparment.

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    Trains from Munich to Salzburg

    by flytheworld Written Sep 18, 2009

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    It's easy to get from Munich to Salzburg, Austria by train. Trains depart Munich two times an hour. Trains depart from Munich Hauptbahnhof and arrive at Salzburg Hauptbahnhof. The trip takes about 1.5 hours and costs 25.50 euros.

    Trains from Munich to Salzburg

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    Trains out of Munich

    by Oldsalt01 Written Jun 13, 2009

    Thank you Norbert for your prompt reply I will look into the information you provided. I have spent a lot of time in the Munich area and can get around pretty good,however I have never taken the train out of the main train station to go anywhere. I did arrive at the main station in January 1956 on a Troop train and had no desire to ever ride a train like that again,also it was one of the coldest days on record for that winter many degrees below zero. You live in a beautiful town,been there a few times plus I spent many weeks in Passion Play Village Oberammergau.Again many thanks for your reply.

    Alfred.

    Please note the spell checker would not let me give the name of the town where the Passion Play is held. kept telling me it was spelled wrong.

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    A Daytrip To Salzburg By Train

    by jimirving Written Mar 20, 2008

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    Salzburg in Austria is only an hour and a half away by train from Munich and well worth the effort.

    There is a train which leaves the main railway station in Munich at 0927 and gets to Salzburg at 1054.Carriages are the enclosed style holding 6 people rather than the open plan we are used to in Britain. There is a return train at 2104 getting back to Munich at 2232.

    The cost(March 2008) was 29 Euros return per person. We also reserved seats at 2 euros per person each way and as the train was pretty packed on both occasions, was glad we did.

    I booked online using the German Railway website. www.bahn.de. Remember to take your credit card if that is how you booked, on the journey, as the ticket collector needs it and would probably charge again if you didnt have it.

    Also remember your passport as we were asked for ours by two plain clothes police officer on the return journey.

    The Railway Station in Salzburg is only about a fifteen minute walk away from the centre of town but give yourself enough time on the way back as it looks different in the dark and is easy to get lost!!

    Salzburg is a very pretty place and a very pleasant place to spend a day.

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    Munich to Venice

    by klasher Written Feb 22, 2008
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    My husband had never been on a train before and I wanted him to be able to take a truly scenic train ride. Most people do the trip from Munich to Venice on an overnight train in order to save money on a room. We opted to experience the beautiful scenery of the Bavarian Alps, Brenner Pass and the endless vineyards instead of staring out dark windows. The trip took approx. 6-7 hours, with only the last hour being not so scenic. I highly recommend this great train ride, with eyes wide open.

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    Strasbourg->Munchen w/ "Dauer-Spezial" low fare

    by ABQ_Hugh Updated Jul 13, 2007

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    You can save € traveling to Germany by buying a ticket to a German border town [or near the border], then another ticket to the final destination.

    We're traveling Strasbourg> Munich soon, and checked bahn.de. We found Strasbourg>Offenburg>Karlsruhe>Munich [2 train changes] for 72 €.

    We noticed the Strasbourg>Offenburg train stops across the Rhine in Kehl, DE. The Kehl>Munich fare [same exact trains] "Dauer-Spezial" price=29 € [maybe because journey is all inside Germany.

    So, A: 1 ticket - Strasbourg>Munich = 72 € B: 2 tickets - Strasbourg >Kehl ticket [3,5 €] + Kehl>Munich [29 €] = 32,5 €. Option A is 39,5 € more than Option B. 39,5 € buys nearly 5 liters of beer at Oktoberfest! The only difference is handing the conductor 2 tickets instead of 1.

    The 29 € "Dauer-Spezial" is available only for a limited amount of seats [sometimes price isn't 29, but rather 49 or 59…still less than normal], and isn't refundable. Our dates are fixed, so we went for it. We bought it online [ticket = PDF]. No need to buy the first ticket early Strasbourg>Offenburg journey is a regional train [no assigned seats].

    I'm sure this methodology works elsewhere. I checked the route from Luxembourg>Munich, and saw the normal fare as 107-129 €. However, by buying a Luxembourg>Trier ticket [13-16 €], then a Trier>Munich ticket [29 €], you get an equally good savings...less than 50 € instead of over 100 €.

    Here's a [German language] page about Dauer-Spezial:
    www.bahn.de/p/view/preise/aktionspreis/dauer_spezial.shtml
    As of 12 July 2007, this URL is good

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