Frauenkirche - Church of Our Lady, Nürnberg

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    Frauenkirche Clock – Männleinlaufen

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    At noon each day the clock on the west façade, Männleinlaufen, rings to commemorate the Golden Bull of 1356, when seven electors paid homage to Charles IV and it was decreed that each new Emperor would spend his first day in office in Nürnberg.

    The seven electors are represented on the clock along with the Emperor; the electors are the archbishops from Cologne, Mainz, and Trier, as well as the Duke of Saxony, Margrave of Brandenburg, King of Bohemia, and Count Palantine on the Rhein.

    The clock was designed in 1509 by S. Lindenast and G. Heuss. The gable dates to this same time and was created by Adam Kraft, one of the last pieces by this sculptor before his death.

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    Frauenkirche – climbing the tower

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    During the annual Christmas market, the Frauenkirche opens its doors for visitors to climb up to the terrace that is below the clock on the west façade. This provides an excellent view of the market and its festivities. The fee is €3/person (2012) and there may be a waiting time because of the very narrow spiral staircase; you must wait until everyone comes down before heading upwards. It is not a long climb since you are only going about half-way up the height of the church.

    At the top of the stairs, you arrive at the Michael’s Choir, a balcony that was created for the Holy Roman Emperor to use when he wanted to be at church services but provided some privacy. It is named Michael’s Choir after the patron saint of the Emperor and the Empire: the archangel Michael.

    During the Christmas market, this area has historical displays of the Christmas markets female Christmas angel, who opens the market from the Frauenkirche’s terrace each year. There are also some historical photos and newspapers of the church.

    Leaving through one side door, you then can head outside to see the market. When I was there it was very cold and there was a lot of ice on the terrace making it rather slippery. But I was able to get some video and some photos of the market, which was why I made the climb. There is no maximum time you can stand out on the terrace, but once ready to come back in, return through the door on the other side and head back down the spiral staircase.

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    Frauenkirche: Artworks

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    Inside the Frauenkirche are a variety of very interesting pieces of art. The city of Nürnberg was blessed to have excellent artists living within and some of these artists used their talents for decorating the church.

    The Tucher Altar stands in the east choir underneath the beautiful stained glass windows. This early panel painting by an unknown artist was painted in the mid-1400s to serve as the high altar of St. Veit’s Monastery. After the Augustinian monastery was demolished in 1816, the altar was transferred to the Frauenkirche. It depicts (left panel) St. Augustine speaking to St. Monica, then (central panel) three scenes from the life of Christ – annunciation, crucifixion, and resurrection, and (right panel) St. Paul the hermit and St. Anthony. While the altar still has the look of a medieval panel painting with the gold backgrounds, one can see the transition to more realistic looking people in the work as the influences of changing techniques of the times.

    The stained glass windows contain three original panes that are the oldest stained glass windows in Nürnberg, dating back to Emperor Charles IV’s commissioning of these windows for the Frauenkirche. They are located in the central part of the east choir above the Madonna that is hanging above the Tucher Altar. From left to right, these three panes depict St. Paul with his symbol the sword, the Virgin Mary with young Jesus, and St. Christopher carrying the young Christ on his shoulders. The remainder of the stained glass windows date to a later 16th and 17th century and were donated by wealthy families from Nürnberg.

    I was fascinated by the two curved paintings that wrap around the front of the large columns in the nave of the church. These epitaphs depict the resurrection of Christ (left) and the archangel Michael (right). The painting on the left was done around 1440 by an unknown artist. The painting on the right was dedicated to the royal chef, Michael Raffael and was painted by Michael Wolgemut (Albrecht Dürer’s instructor) around 1489.

    There is lots to see in the Frauenkirche; be sure to look around at the various statues and paintings, the frescoes in the Entrance Hall, and the sculptures on the exterior, especially the west façade.

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    Frauenkirche (Our Lady Church)

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    Situated at the Hauptmarkt (central market square), the Frauenkirche (Our Lady Church) was built in the location of the former Jewish synagogue after the pogrom of 1349. Before this time, the market area was a swampy part of Nürnberg known as the Jewish quarter with the synagogue located nearby. However, for political reasons, Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV had the Jewish quarter razed, resulting in nearly 600 deaths; the possessions of these Jewish people were transferred to Charles, who used the money to buy support from his followers. In place of the Jewish quarter, a central market place was developed and over the site of the synagogue was built a Catholic church dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

    The Frauenkirche was originally to be the storage and display location of the Imperial Regalia, which includes the Emperor’s crown, clock, scepter, orb, and reliquaries, otherwise known as the Crown Jewels. It was determined during the building of the church (after the design had been set) that the Regalia would not be located at the church (they went to Prague instead). However, the church design was not altered to reflect this change. The design is the earliest example of a Gothic hall church, with the nave being as high as the side aisles. In keeping with the Gothic architecture, visitors eyes are drawn upwards toward the east choir and the tall stained glass windows allow the light to enter into what appears to be a rather plain stone hall.

    During the Protestant Reformation the Frauenkirche became a Luthern church when Nürnberg as a city converted. However, after the Catholic church purchased the church from the Lutherans in the early 1800s, so the Frauenkirche is once again a Catholic church.

    Heavily damaged in the World War II bombings of Nürnberg, the church has been restored. The west façade (the one facing the market square) and the entrance hall and Michael’s Choir above it remained intact after the 1945 bombings.

    At noon each day the clock on the west façade, Männleinlaufen, rings to commemorate the Golden Bull of 1356, when seven electors paid homage to Charles IV and it was decreed that each new Emperor would spend his first day in office in Nürnberg.

    During the Christmas market it is possible (for a fee) to climb up to the terrace below the clock for a view overlooking the market.

    The church is open daily, although on Sundays it opens in the afternoon. Visitors to the church can use the large information handouts in the back of the church for details on the church and the artwork. These are also available online at the Frauenkirche website.

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    INSIDE THE FRAUENKIRCHE

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2013

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    Time to head inside and see some of the important pieces, like main altar, which was the high altar in the Augustine Church up until 1487, the "Star of David," embedded in the floor in remembrance of the old Synagogue that once stood here. There are many wooden sculptures from the 15th & 16th centuries, panel paintings, historical coats of arms and stained glass windows.

    THE CHURCH IS OPEN
    Monday and Thursday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    Tuesday and Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Saturday: 9.30 a.m. to 6.30 p.m.
    Sunday: 12.30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
    Daily at NOON - THE ASTRONOMICAL CLOCK PLAYS.

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    THE OUTSIDE OF THE FRAUENKIRCHE

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2013

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    After viewing the Schon Brunnen, I headed across the square to the Frauenkirche. The Church is known as a "Hall Church" as it has two aisles and a tribune for an Emperor. The church contains nine bays supported by four columns. In 1945, it was nearly destroyed in bomb attacks and needed to be restored, this was completed in 1955.
    It was a shame I wasn't here at mid-day, as this is when the Astronomical Clock "Mannleinlaufen" plays. The clock was installed on the outside of the church in 1506, it shows the Moon phases and the Holy Roman Emperor seated with the prince-electors surrounding him. It was built in commemoration of the adoption of the Golden Bull in 1356.
    So, if you want to see this, join the crowd!

    As well, there a quite a few sculptures and detailed work on the outside, worth having a look at before venturing inside.

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    Frauenkirche, Nurnberg, Germany

    by TrendsetterME Written Jun 2, 2013

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    Emperor Charles IV had the "Church of Our Lady's (Frauenkirche)" built here between 1355 and 1358 on the site of the destroyed synagogue of the former Jewish quarter (pogrom in 1349).

    It was the first Gothic hall church in Franconia, constructed as an Imperial court chapel with three aisles. Its builder was presumably Peter Parler, the master builder of the Prague St Vitus' Cathedral. In 1361, on the occasion of the baptism of the heir to the throne, the Imperial Crown Jewels were displayed here for the first time.

    The "Männleinlaufen" ("Running Men" clockwork at noon), created in 1509 by Sebastian Lindenast and Georg Heuß, is reminiscent of the proclamation of the Golden Bull of 1356: seven electors pay homage to Emperor Charles IV sitting on the throne. The main altar is the "Tucher Altar" which was the high altar in the Augustine Church up until 1487.

    The epitaphs, most of which are from the Dominican's and the Augustine's churches, include works by Adam Kraft (Peringsdörfer epitaph) and by Michael Wolgemut.In 1816, the Church of Our Lady's was given to Nuremberg's Catholic congregation.

    Opening hours are as follows ... :
    Monday and Thursday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    Tuesday and Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Saturday: 9.30 a.m. to 6.30 p.m.
    Sunday: 12.30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
    daily: 12 p.m. "Männleinlaufen" (clockwork)

    Frauenkirche, Nurnberg, Germany Frauenkirche, Nurnberg, Germany Frauenkirche, Nurnberg, Germany Frauenkirche, Nurnberg, Germany Frauenkirche, Nurnberg, Germany
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    The Frauenkirche – Church of Our Lady

    by grayfo Written Aug 12, 2012

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    The church was built between 1355 and 1358 on the site of the destroyed synagogue of the former Jewish quarter and was the first Gothic hall church in Franconia, constructed as an Imperial court chapel with three aisles. One of the most notable features is the Männleinlaufen, a mechanical clock below which is the Holy Roman Emporer surrounded by prince-electors.

    March 2012

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    Frauenkirche

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 15, 2012

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    The Frauenkirche overlooks Haupt Markt Platz. This church has lovely carvings on the outside and is peaceful on the inside. According to our friend who is a long time resident of Nurnberg, it is from this church that the Christ kind opens Nuremberg's annual Christmas Market. There is also a mechanical clock on the front of the church. Every day at noon 7 elector figures come out of the clock to pay homage to King Karl IV.

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    Frauenkirche

    by Twan Updated Feb 27, 2012

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    The pulse of the city Nuremberg in Germany beats at the market square Hauptmarkt - that lively place is dominated by the beautiful Church Frauenkirche and the Gothic fountain Schöner Brunnen, one of the most visited sights in Nuremberg. In December it gets really crowded there, because then it's time for the world famous Christmas market in Nuremberg the Christkindlesmarkt Nuremberg!

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    Frauenkirche

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 6, 2011

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    On the east side of the square in Nuremberg is the Gothic Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady, 1352-61; R.C.).
    Above the porch with its rich sculptural decoration is the "Männleinlaufen," an old clock with mechanical figures (the seven Electors pacing round the Emperor Charles IV - a reference to the promulgation of the Golden Bull in 1356; performances daily at noon). Notable features of the interior are the Tucher Altar (c. 1440) and two handsome monuments by Adam Krafft.

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    Frauenkirche

    by leics Written Aug 15, 2009

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    This rather small 14th century church has a fascinating history.

    This area was once swampy and unpleasant. It was the Jewish quarter of Medieval Nunrberg. When the two parts of the town on either side of the River Pegnitz were joined together, it became an important area.

    Charles lV ordered that the Jews should be forced to leave so that a new marketplace could be built. In 1349, 562 Jews who did not leave were burnt to death.

    In 1360, on the site of the synagogue, the Frauenkirche was built. It was originally intended to house the crown jewels and holy relics, so it was designed almost as a fortress. The Emperor changed his mind.....jewels and relics were taken elsewhere...but the plan of the church remained the same. It was designed by Peter Parler, the man who also designed St Vitus' Cathedral in Prague.

    Frauenkirche is quite small and foursquare, very badly damaged in the Second World War but so beautifully restored so that one would not know there had been damage.

    The artworks (altars, carvings, memorials, paintings) which it had held were kept safely underground during the war, so they have returned to their original places. And you can also see some Medieval wall-paintings which have been uncovered during restoration.

    The entrance arch has a most beautiful and complex decoration: the figures you see are original, and date from the building of the church.

    Inside, above the entrance, is a gallery (the Michaelschor) intended for the Emperor to attend services without having to mix with those 'beneath' him.

    A church well worth exploring.

    Superb Medieval entrance carvings Exterior Interior Michaelschor Medieval memorial plaque
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    frauenkirche

    by doug48 Updated Jul 27, 2009

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    the frauenkirche, ( church of our lady) was built in the 14 th century. at noon each day mechanical figures act out the story of the golden bull of 1356. inside the church is the 1440 tucher alter. this church is located on the hauptmarkt in the center of old nuremberg. during the years of the third reich the hauptmarkt was called adolf hitler platz. it was here that hitler reviewed his political organizations during the nuremberg party rallies. to see before and after pictures of the hauptmarkt visit www.thirdreichruins.com

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    Frauenkirche - inside: Adam Kraft

    by Mikebond Written Apr 19, 2009

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    Other interesting art works, apart from the Tucher-Altar, are the two epitaphs by Adam Kraf(f)t: Pergensdorffer epitaph (1498), portraying the Virgin Protectress, and Rebeck epitaph (1500), with Virgin Mary's coronation. The former is located on the wall of the left aisle, while the latter lies on the pillar on the left of the apsis.
    There are also other beautiful sculptures and paintings in Frauenkirche, but since they are not important, I will put them in a travelogue.

    Pergensdorffer epitaph Rebeck epitaph
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    CHURCH OF OUR LADY (FRAUENKIRCHE)

    by kmohandas Updated Mar 8, 2008

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    Church Of Our Lady is a major land mark of city located right in the heart of Hauptmarkt (Main Market), which is famous for X-mas shopping. The construction of the church was completed in 1361 AD is famous for it's ancient sculptures. Notable attractions areTucher Altar and an ancient clock.This church looks magnificient and stands right in the heart of the city.

    FRAUENKIRCHE THE MAGNIFICIENT CHURCH
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