Kaiserburg, Nürnberg

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  • Kaiserburg
    by brendareed
  • Kaiserburg
    by brendareed
  • Kaiserburg
    by brendareed
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    Kaiserburg – climbing Simwell Tower

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    If you are at Kaiserburg on a day when the weather is nice and clear, I recommend taking the time to climb the Simwell Tower, the tall stone round tower at the edge of the bailey. Not only did the tower survive intact after the bombings during World War II, but it is one of the older parts of the castle complex, dating back to the 1200s (the upper roofed pavilion at the top was added in the 1560s). It served as the keep for the castle and as a defensive watchtower strategically placed at the high point of the rock on which the castle was built.

    Climbing the tower means climbing up a large spiral staircase – but this is a wide open staircase that is better for those that don’t like small confined places and allows one to breathe as they head up the stairs. It doesn’t take too long to get to the top where visitors are treated to a magnificent view of Nürnberg. From this vantage point, it is easy to understand how quickly invaders would have been detected by those standing watch in the tower.

    Admission fees are required to obtain entry inside the buildings, which include the palace, the museum, the deep well, and the tower. There are several price structures depending on what you are interested in seeing (i.e. if you want to see the palace but not climb the tower). We opted to get the combination ticket at €7/person which gave us entry to the everything (tickets to only the well and the tower are €3,50).

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    Kaiserburg – Imperial Castle Museum

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    The museum had an extensive display of military armor and weapons along with household objects dating back through the centuries. I particularly enjoyed the knights armor (as well as the armor of their steeds). There was also an interesting display of fireworks and explained how Kaiserburg was used as a launch site.

    Most of the signs were in both German and English, clearly explaining the history behind the objects on display. Overall, the displays are well done and clearly labeled. The museum is housed in part of the imperial castle and has beautiful hardwood floors and half-timbered walls inside.

    Admission fees are required to obtain entry inside the buildings, which include the palace, the museum, the deep well, and the tower. There are several price structures depending on what you are interested in seeing (i.e. if you want to see the palace but not climb the tower). We opted to get the combination ticket at €7/person which gave us entry to the everything (tickets to only the well and the tower are €3,50).

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    • Museum Visits

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    Kaiserburg – Nürnberg’s Imperial Castle

    by brendareed Written Oct 16, 2014

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    Standing high above the city of Nürnberg is the former Imperial castle of Kaiserburg. The castle complex is actually made up of several sections: the imperial castle, the former burgraves’ castle (Burggrafenburg), and municipal buildings of the former Imperial city (now a youth hostel). There is a deep well, a chapel, and two towers in the complex, along with a museum and the lavish Emperor’s rooms that can be viewed by visitors today.

    Between the years 1050 and 1571, all Holy Roman Emperors used Nürnberg as their home at some point since it was where the Imperial Diets and administrative courts met for the empire. It was also a city known for valuable trade and commerce during the middle ages. Although parts of the castle were destroyed in World War II, they have been rebuilt to their former glory. The Simwell Tower, which can be climbed, remains intact as it was left unharmed by the bombing raids.

    The double Imperial Chapel in the palace complex was closed for renovations and was covered in scaffolding, which was disappointing since that is the oldest part of the castle that remains today (from 1200s). We were able to peek in at other the chapel in the complex but it was getting ready for a wedding so we couldn’t wander around the small building that sits outside the walled part of the castle.

    Visitors can walk around the castle complex free of charge and look about at the exterior parts of the buildings and towers while enjoying the view overlooking the old town part of Nürnberg. Admission fees are required to obtain entry inside the buildings, which include the palace, the museum, the deep well, and the tower. There are several price structures depending on what you are interested in seeing (i.e. if you want to see the palace but not climb the tower).

    We returned later in the year during the Christmas market and went back to Kaiserburg in the evening. While the castle was closed, visitors could still walk around parts of the complex and get a beautiful view of the city at night.

    We opted to get the combination ticket at €7/person which gave us entry to the everything (tickets to only the well and the tower are €3,50).

    Kaiserburg is open daily from 0900-1800 (April to September) and 1000-1600 (October to March); closed January 1, Shrove Tuesday, Dec. 24, 25, and Dec 31.

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    Kaiserburg

    by iaint Updated Dec 4, 2012

    This is a complex of 3 castles, located on a hill at the north end of the old town.

    The oldest building there dates from 1040 - the Fünfeckturm.

    For €5.50 you can get a 90 minute guided tour, and that is compulsory if you want to see the whole thing. You can go around the museum on your own - costs the same - and that’s what we did. Good value - you'd be lucky to get in the toilet for that price if it were the UK.

    (I have an aversion to the pathological obsession with inane details which characterises most guided tours. 90 minutes would have had me chewing the walls.)

    Probably good views of the city from up there, but it was a grey foggy day when we visited, so hard to tell.

    Wikipedia has a comprehensive description of the place - with all the inane details.

    as you approach inner courtyard view from museum exit from inside museum courtyard, again
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    Kaiserburg Museum

    by antistar Written Jun 21, 2005

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    Inside the main building, the Palas, at the fair end of the complex as you approach it from Bergstrasse is the Kaiserberg Museum. The museum charts the architectural, military, and political history of the castle, which was at the very center of the Holy Roman Empire from the 12th to the 16th century. The museum costs €6 euros to enter, which is perhaps a bit steep, but it is free if you have the Nuremberg Card, which this castle helps to make good value for money.

    Chapel and Palas, Kaiserburg, Nuremberg

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    Kaiserburg

    by Sjalen Updated Nov 20, 2004

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    Towering above the Old Town is the huge burg, or fortress. There has been a fortress here since the 11th century, even though what you see today is a few hundred years later. Impressive it is nevertheless and it has been the residence for the emperors and other rulers since it was first founded so it has seen a lot!

    You can buy tickets for the museum, Sinwell tower and Tiefer Brunnen well, but also include the Great Hall. The tower has no lift so it is only for those in good shape, but you have great Nürnberg views from the top, although similar views can be had from the fortress itself on its hill. The museum is full of old weapons (some amazingly huge guns!) and chivalry items. Then you go to the well house, where a guide tells you of the quite fascinating 47 metre deep well, necessary in case of sieges of the fortress. A chandellier is lowered into the well so you can appreciate just how deep it is. The reason there was a house built above it is because the water got very messy with all the animals and activities of the yard.

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    Kaiserburg Tower

    by zrim Written Apr 15, 2003

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    I like how the folks who constructed this fortification so many centuries ago integrated the natural rock formations into the castle walls. Makes for a pretty neat effect, I think. The big boulders are great to lounge upon and lazily watch the tourists dutifully file on by as they make their way downhill to the ancient city center.

    fortified stronghold
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    Kaiserburg museum

    by bonio Written Aug 5, 2005

    Again pay to enter if you visit the Kaiserburg and see the history of the place, both military and political. Entertaining set of exhibits kept us occupied for a couple of hours.

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    Kaiserburg

    by bonio Written Aug 5, 2005

    A short sharp climb from the centre is the Kaiserburg, once the imperial home. Grounds are good to walk around and the museum is well worth a visit.

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