Lorenzkirche - St Lorenz Church, Nürnberg

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Lorenzkirche

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 6, 2011

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    In Lorenzer Platz stands the twin-towered Gothic church of St Lawrence (St-Lorenzkirche; 13th-15th c.; Protestant), the city's largest church. Above the beautiful west doorway (c. 1355) is a rose window 9m in diameter.
    Outstanding among the many works of art it contains are the "Annunciation" by Veit Stoss (1517-18) which hangs in the choir, the tabernacle by Adam Krafft (1493-96), the crucifix by Veit Stoss on the high altar, the Krell Altar (behind the high altar; c. 1480), with the oldest surviving representation of the town, and the superb stained glass (1477-93) in the choir.

    You can watch my 3 min 03 sec Video Nurnberg Lorenzkirkhe in 2010 HD out of my Youtube channel.

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  • andrea.d's Profile Photo

    St. Lorenzkirche

    by andrea.d Written Feb 17, 2004

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    The present building was begun in 1260 on the foundations of an earlier Romanesque basilica and ended a hundred years later when the immense tracery work on the rose window with its many levels and 9m diameter was set on the decorative wall between the 2 church towers. In the Second World the church (except of its towers) was utterly destroyed, but it was rebuilt by the 1952.

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    st. lorenz kirche

    by doug48 Updated Jul 27, 2009

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    st. lorenz kirche

    st. lorenz kirche (st. lawrence's church) was built between 1250 and 1477. it's 80 meter high twin spires dominate the skyline of nuremberg's altstadt. the main attraction of the interior of the church is the 1518 annunciation carving by veit stoss.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Lorenzkirche - Church of St Laurent

    by Kathrin_E Written Jul 12, 2010

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    Interior of Lorenzkirche
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    Lorenzkirche is the parish church of the old town south of Pegnitz river. The wealth and pride of the citizens shows in the architecture and furnishing of this late medieval church. An entiure book could be written (and more than one has been written) about the late medieval works of art in this church. So let me sum up what is special about it.

    There is hardly another church with a larger collection of late medieval church art, all pieces in their original location and context. Even more remarkable, this is a Lutheran church and all those art works are from pre-reformation, i.e. Roman Catholic times. Altars, statues and windows with images of saints, a tabernacle and so on are neither needed nor used in Lutheran churches and do not correspond with protestant lore. However, they are still there and have always been.

    Most medieval works of art that have been preserved can be found in Lutheran, not Roman Catholic churches. An expert called this effect the "preserving power of Lutheranism". Catholic churches tend to be renovated, refurbished and redecorated according to the latest fashion and style all the time because the best and newest is just good enough to worship the Lord. Lutheranism, however, counts those works of art among the adiaphora , the side things, which are not important. As long as the images are not worshipped, they can be kept or not, it does not matter. So the pre-reformation furniture and decoration stayed in the church.

    All these art works are made from donations by Nürnberg's "upper 10,000". Most of them bear the crests of the patrician families or even the image of the donators. The works of art tell a lot about the history of the city. The most important families had their own chapels along the side naves and choir. Others at least owned representative seats. Their donations contributed to the ornation of the church with stained glass windows, vasa sacra, statues and frescoes, paid for masses read for them at certain altars, and so on. Such donations were made to honour the Lord and his saints and to ensure one's own welfare in the afterlife. When the reformation was introduced, these donations stopped. However, the catholic works of art were not removed from the church. The wealthy families were still just as influential in the parish and would of course not remove the items their parents and grandparents had had made for the church.

    In the run of the centuries a lot of items have disappeared but a notable amount has remained. Imagine the church to be filled with at least twice as many pieces. One or two altars were standing at each column and in each chapel. It was hard to find space for more. All churches looked like that in the late middle ages, very few still do.

    Among the art works, the most precious and famous are
    Englischer Gruß by Veit Stoß, which translates to not "English" but "Angelish salutation". The wooden sculpture hanging form the vault of the choir shows the Annunciation with mary and the Archangel gabriel, surrounded by an oversized rosary.
    Tabernacle by Adam Krafft, a specialist in stone sculptures. The gothic structure is so high it does not fit under the arch, so he bent the tip. The tabernacle is carried by three kneeling figures: portraits of Krafft himself and his two assistants.

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    St. Lorenz Church

    by Travelchili Written Nov 30, 2003

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    St. Lorenz Church

    St. Lorenz Chruch took over 200 years to complete. The works began in 1270 and were finally finished by the 16th century.

    The interior of the church is very special, so don't miss that. You will find the church full of carved figures that date back to the 14th century. Much of the church's stained and painted glass dates from the 15th century.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    St. Lorenz Church

    by nicolaitan Updated Nov 18, 2007

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    Nuremberg's largest church was built between 1270 and 1470, with the interior decor not begun until after the Reformation. This gothic behemoth with its towers 250 ft high dominates the southern half of Nuremberg's old city. Most visitors approach from Frauentor at a 90 degree angle to the facade - to best appreciate the overwhelming gothic detail walk down Karolinenstrasse a short ways to face the front of the church. The rose window dates to the 1530's.
    The exterior sculptures follow Redemption from Adam and Eve to Judgement Day, although hard to follow and understand from street level. The interior features a woodcarving of the Annunciation ( a recurring theme in my writings here ) hung from the ceiling like a chandelier and carved by Veit Stoss, one of Germany's most famous woodcarvers who actually was a Nuremberg native. Another famous artwork is the House of Sacraments, often called Adam Kraft's masterpiece, a stone sculpture of the Passion of Christ from Last Supper to Resurrection. The resurrected Jesus is carved from wood, a living substance, while all the other figures are from stone. The fine detail is indeed exquisite. During WWII, these treasures were removed and safely kept away from the bombing.
    The church of St. Lorenz is indeed excessively Gothic.

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    Lorenzkirche - overview

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 21, 2007

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    Lorenzkirche (Saint Lorenz's church) is a Gothic masterpiece with a long history. The first stone was set in 1280, but the aisles and the choir were built in 1439-77 and the two towers later on.
    Worth remarking on the façade are the huge rose window, with a diameter of 9 metres, and the portal with statues telling the life of Christ (as in any self-respecting Gothic portal), dating of 1350-60. However, these are copies of the originals that are today located at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.
    Before entering, be aware that, if you want to take pictures, you have to buy a photo-permission ("Foto-Erlebnis") for 5 euro. It is worth paying, since this way you contribute to keep the church in good conditions and can take a lot of pictures (and there certainly is a lot to photograph!).

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    St. Lorenz church

    by german_eagle Updated Apr 14, 2003

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    Inside St. Lorenz church

    St. Lorenz is the largest and most important church of Nürnberg. It was built in 13th – 15th century in gothic style. From outside the Western façade is the highlight. Inside you find numerous masterpieces of art work: The carved “Engelsgruss” by Veit Stoss, the tabernacle by Adam Kraft, the crucifix of Veit Stoss, the stained glass windows and some altars to name only a few. Please see my travelogue as well.

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    St Lorenz Kirche

    by antistar Written Jun 24, 2005

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    St Lorenz Kirche, Nuremberg

    St Lawrence church is the second of Nuremberg's twin spired churches, and also a U-Bahn stop and was built between 1250 and 1477. The Annunciation that hangs above the altar was by Veit Stoss, whose grave can also be found in the St Johannis Friedhof graveyard mentioned later.

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    Lorenzkirche - inside: paintings and altars

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 23, 2007

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    Dreik��nigsaltar
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    There are so many paintings, painted windows and altar-pieces in Lorenzkirche that it's impossible to show and to talk about all of them here. There are also some ancient windows dating of the 13th to the 15th centuries.
    The first photo shows the painting located on the Dreikönigsaltar, where the Three Kings have come to visit Mary and the Child. The altar in the second pic has a sculpted Last Dinner. In the third photo you see the Deposition from the Cross below and, above, the Resurrection. The fourth picture portrays an opening altar-piece and the last one depicts one of the painted windows.

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    Lorenzkirche - inside: Engelsgruss

    by Mikebond Written Jul 23, 2007

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    Engelsgruss
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    Here is what every tourist with a guidebook wants to see in Lorenzkirche: the Annunciation (literally "Angel's greeting") by Veit Stoss (1517-19). It is full of small sculptures and paintings that one doesn't see at first sight. Below there is the byblical snake who tempted Eve, with the apple in its mouth. Unfortunately, you cannot see it well in this photo. The last picture shows the backside of the Annunciation, which is also interesting for the round paintings of the Sun and the Moon.

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    LORENZ CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2013

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    Lorenz Church
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    The Lorenz Church or St. Lawrence, is a Gothic Church that stands in the place of where the Lawrence Chapel once stood. Once again, it is a very old Church with beginnings from 1243.
    By the time I reached this Church it was closed.
    It was Sunday, and it closes at 4pm, so be aware of this if you wish to see the inside.
    I was disappointed, but couldn't do anything about it. The outside has some nice architecture, and the inside has lots to be admired.

    ARTWORK IN THE CHURCH............
    Beautiful Madonna (1280/90)
    The adoring Magi (1360)
    Apostle figures (1380/90)
    Arch Cross (end 14th century)
    Three young woman stone (around 1410)
    Deocarusaltar (1437)
    Lawrence and Stephen (1440/50)
    Archangel Michael (1475/80)
    Krell Altar (1483)
    Sebastian Smarter (1490)
    Peter Vischer Chandelier (1498)
    Relief of the strangulation of Beatrix (around 1500)
    Crucifix by Veit Stoss (1520)
    Devil's Well (1888)

    OPEN....Monday to Saturday 9- 5pm Sunday 1-4pm
    During the Advent season: weekdays 9 - 6pm Sundays 1-6pm

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    Lorenzkirche - inside: sculptures

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 24, 2007

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    tabernacle (top)
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    There is so much to see in Lorenzkirche that it will prove worth paying 5 euro for the photo permission.
    The pillars dividing the nave from the aisles are decorated with sculptures of the 13th-15th centuries. You must have a look at the tabernacle (1493-95) by Adam Kraft, who has self-portrayed himself at the basis of it (he is the man with the black beard).
    You will also see the big crucifix (around 1500) by Veit Stoss the Elder, who is also the author of the attraction you have actually paid for to see...

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    Lorenzkirche

    by leics Updated Jul 26, 2009

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    Although undergoing substantial renovation and restoration when I visited (July 2009), this church is still well worth exploring.

    It dates from the mid-1400s but, almost inevitably, was badly damaged in the bombing and firestorms which the city suffered during the Second World War.

    It has three aisles, with some beautiful artwork (much of which was safely stored underground during the war). A beautiful carved wooden 'Annunciation' by Veit Stoss (16th century) hangs high above the nave, glowing even against its background of scaffolding. When this is removed, and the carving is silhouetted against the basilica windows, it will be a truly beautiful sight.

    I especially liked the sculpted self-portait of Adam Kraft at the bottom of the tabernacle which he created (see photos), but the chucrh is full of lovely things to explore. Apart from various wooden altars, and monuments, and memorials there are some Medieval wall-paintings which, although much worn, I suspect were uncovered in post-war restorations.

    The Medieval Madonna and child grinning at each otheramused me.....so very naturalistic! :-)

    Apologies for the poor quality of the photos. I do not use flash in ancient places, and have terrible camera-shake on occasion!

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    Church of St. Lorenz

    by Leipzig Written Mar 19, 2004

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    Church of St. Lorenz

    The construction of St. Lorenz was begun in 1250 and lasted over two hundred years. It has always been the largest church of Nürnberg. The interior has a lot of highlights for visitors - for example the tabernacle by Adam Kraft, the crucifix of Veit Stoss or the colorful glass windows.

    I recommend german_eagle's travelogue for more impressions of the interior

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