Sebalduskirche - St Sebaldus Church, Nürnberg

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  • Tomb of St. Sebald
    Tomb of St. Sebald
    by balhannah
  • Inside St. Sebald
    Inside St. Sebald
    by balhannah
  • Inside St. Sebald
    Inside St. Sebald
    by balhannah
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    TOMB OF ST. SEBALD & MORE!

    by balhannah Written Jul 7, 2013

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    Tomb of St. Sebald
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    Inside the Church of St. Sebald is the Tomb of Saint Sebaldus (or Sebald).
    Sebald was a Danish prince, who performed several miracles during his lifetime. One was transforming icicles into fuel for a warm fire.
    The story goes that he was staying in a Peasant's cottage, where the warmth from the fire wasn't enough to keep them warm. The couple were poor and couldn't afford to use any more wood on the fire, so he asked the woman to bring in a handful of icicles, which she did. Sebald threw them on the fire, and instead of putting it out, flames appeared and the fire created the much needed warmth.
    Saint Sebald lies in a silver coffin from 1397.

    There are many sculptures worth seeing and lots of very old murals. Very high stained glass windows were a pleasure to look at, just wish my photo's turned out better!

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    ST. SEBALD CHURCH

    by balhannah Updated Jul 7, 2013

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    St. Sebald sculptures
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    St. Sebald church was under wraps, being restored, so no really nice outside photo of the whole Church for me! At least the twin towers were out in the open! It happens to be one of the largest Churches in Nuremberg, the other is St. Lorenz Church.
    Evidently, nobody is sure just when in the 13th Century this late Romanesque Church of St. Sebald was completed, but is believed to be around 1274/75. Over time, the church was altered to widen the side aisles and increase the height of the steeples in high gothic style. The late gothic hall chancel was built between 1358 and 1379. Then, in the 17th century, the interior in Baroque and galleries were added.
    Once again, this Church was nearly destroyed from bombs in WWII, along with all the other Churches in Nuremberg. Restoration is still happening today because of this. At least, I found some really nice sculptures that were covered up. I was pleased I went for a walk around the outside.

    Tower tours are Thursday 6pm and Saturday 4.30pm
    Admission 3 euros for Adults
    January to March: 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. from April: 9.30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    St Sebald Kirche - St Sebaldus Church

    by grayfo Written Aug 5, 2012

    Started around 1230-40; the church was awarded the title of "Parish Church" in 1255 with the work completed by 1274-75. The church was altered between 1309 and 1345 to widen the side aisles and increase the height of the steeples, the hall chancel was built between 1358 and 1379. After comprehensive damage during the Second World War reconstruction started and in some areas is still continuing today.

    9:30 am to 4:00 pm

    email pfarramt@sebalduskirche.de

    March 2012

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    St Seabald's Church

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 15, 2012

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    Nail Cross
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    Saint Seabald's Church Sebalduskirche
    This is a beautiful church with several lovely carvings on the outside. Entry is free, give an optional donation towards the upkeep of the church. Inside is peaceful with many lovely stained glass windows and paintings. There was an exhibition of old photos showing the square around the church in Hitler's time with swastikas hanging from all the windows of the surrounding houses. This interested me, because I have just finished reading The Book Thief a novel set in wartime Munich. It tells the story of a German family who hide a Jew in their basement. In one scene they are panicking because they have to hang their flag out of the window, but cannot find it.
    Saint Seabald's was flattened by bombs in 1945 and some of the other photos show the damage and devastation that was done to this lovely building. They then go on to show the restoration and rebuilding that took place. So the exhibition is about triumph over despair.
    There was a cross of nails on display on one of the church's pillars. This was made from three nails retrieved from the smouldering remains of Coventry Cathedral's spire. Coventry Cathedral was flattened in 1940. The cross was given/lent by the people of Coventry and, for me anyway, was a powerful symbol of the unity felt by those who have suffered in a war regardless of what side they were on.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Sebalduskirche

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 7, 2011

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    Sebalduskirche
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    St Sebaldus's Church (1225-73; Protestant), with a magnificent Gothic east choir (1379). On the outside of the choir is the Schreyer-Landauer tomb, a masterpiece by Adam Krafft (1492).

    Inside the church, on a pillar in the north aisle, can be seen the "Madonna in an Aureole" (1420-25). In the east choir is the famous tomb of St Sebaldus (1508-19). Behind the tomb is a moving Crucifixion group by Veit Stoss (1507 and 1520). There is also an organ with 6,000 pipes.

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  • mirchica's Profile Photo

    St. Sebald Church

    by mirchica Written Jan 7, 2011

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    4 more images

    This church impressed me more with its history. It was burnt during the World War II. It was built in XIII – th century and after the World War II it had to be reconstructed again. In the church there are amazing sculptures and also pictures of its history. It was a pleasure for me to go through the years and see it on pictures.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Sebalduskirche – Church of St Sebald

    by Kathrin_E Written Jul 24, 2010

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    Gothis choir of St Sebald
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    Sebalduskirche is the protestant parish church of the northern half of the old town between Pegnitz river and the castle. Like Lorenzkirche it is a church of the citizens. Wealthy families contributed to its furnishing and decoration in the late middle ages. There are not as many works of art preserved as in Lorenzkirche but the amount is still amazing.

    This is the oldest parish church of Nürnberg. Parts of the nave still derive from the Romanesque church of the 13th century. Later on the much higher gothic choir was added. This choir was heavily damaged in World War II and rebuilt in its former shape.

    St Sebaldus is a local saint, one of the two patrons of the city. He is buried within the church. His shrine is framed by the beautiful bronze tomb by Peter Vischer (1507), which is still standing behind the altar. The church is a Lutheran church, so the presence of the shrine is remarkable. A cute detail: dolphins and the snails that carry the tomb.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Sebalduskirche

    by leics Updated Aug 15, 2009

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    Exterior
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    This is a lovely church, Nurnburg's oldest and dating from the early 1400s.

    It is remarkably large for an 'ordinary' parish church, and has some beautiful Medieval (and later) artwork inside.

    The church was badly damaged during air-raids in the Second World War, and photographs set out within show just how much care and effort has gone into its rebilding and restoration. It is now one of the churches which has a 'cross of nails'from Coventry Cathedral.

    The tomb of St Sebald, the patron saint of Nurnburg, is intricately detailed and really rather beautiful (from the early 14th century, by Peter Vischer the Elder).iloved the way it is supported on a group of beautifully-detailed and realistic (though rather enormous) snails....I wonder what the significance of that is?

    Some Medieval wall-paintings too (possibly uncovered during post-war restoration work?), strange little Medieval carvings on the stonework, wooden statues galore and a fascinating memorial-with-a-balcony, presumably created at the height of the fashion for adding oriel windows to one's house (see my Nuremburg 'oriel' travelogue).

    A fascinating church to explore......definitely not to be missed.

    For some reason my camera was (or my hands were) very wobbly that morning, so I apologise in advance for the blurriness of the photos attached to this tip.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    saint sebaldus kirche

    by doug48 Updated Jul 27, 2009

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    st. sebaldus

    st. sebaldus kirche was begun in 1225 originally in the romanesque style then was altered over time with gothic additions. a couple of attractions in the church is the schreyer-landauer tomb by adam kraft in 1492 and the 16 th century shrine of st. sebaldus.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    St. Sebaldus

    by Airpunk Written Dec 18, 2007

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    St. Sebaldus church

    St. Sebaldus was once one of the two main churches in Nuernberg, with the other one being St. Lorenz. Indeed, the city was divided into the Sebalder Seite (the part north of the river) and Lorenzer Seite (the part south of it). The church was build between 1230 and 1273 in romanesque style, but an expasion between 1361 and 1379 gave the church today’s gothic appearance.

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Sebaldkirche - inside: Sebaldusgrab

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 31, 2007

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    Sebaldus's tomb
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    One of the main attractions of the church is the tomb of the patron saint of Nürnberg Sebaldus, one of the masterpieces by Peter Vischer the Elder, who worked in this church with his sons and disciples from 1508 to 1519.
    You can see the statues of the Apostles and, below, bas-relieves of the Saint's life. Notice the snails that serve as pedestals.

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Sebaldkirche - inside: architecture

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 30, 2007

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    Sebaldkirche: the nave
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    The interior of Saint Sebaldus's may not be so rich as that of Lorenzkirche, since this church was destroyed during the WWII bombing of Nürnberg. However, there are many interesting art works, as you will see in the following tips.
    If the church looks late Romanesque outside, inside it is without doubt Gothic: a high nave, large windows to let the Lord's light come over the believers, many decorations...
    The pillars of the nave are decorated with wooden statues of the 14th and 15th centuries. You will also enjoy some interesting paintings and Saint Sebald's tomb (last photo of this tip).

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Sebaldkirche - overview

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 30, 2007

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    Sebaldkirche
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    Saint Sebaldus's church was built in 1230-73 in late Romanesque style (the Western choir and the towers date of that period) and widened in 1361-79, with the construction of the Eastern choir and the transformation of the aisles.
    This church was one of the centres of the Protestant move in Nürnberg. Before going inside have a careful look at the beautiful sculpted portals.

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  • islaazul's Profile Photo

    St. Sebaldus Church

    by islaazul Updated Aug 31, 2005

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    Christmas concert choir practice.

    Consecrated in 1273, this church is an excellent example of the transition from Romanesque to German Gothic styles. Originally built as a Romanesque basilica with two choirs, it was remodelled during the 14th century.

    The church was badly damaged during WWII and has been completely restored. It is considered to be Nürnberg's oldest and finest church.

    One of the great things about the Chrismas season is all the concerts. If you're low on budget, you can try to catch a choir practice, like we did at this church.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    St Sebaldus

    by antistar Written Jun 22, 2005

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    St Sebaldus, Nuremberg

    With twin spires that soar above the Nuremberg skyline, this church has a profile that matches its status as the city's oldest and most important church. Unmissable from many parts of the city, and on any picture of Nuremberg's cityscape. The church was originally constructed in the thirteenth century as is covered from top to toe, inside and out, in some of the best artwork of the Nuremberg masters. You can't miss it, but you can find it stretching out from the Town Hall down towards the Toy Museum. It's worth a walk around even if you haven't got the time to take a look inside.

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