Scheinfeld Travel Guide

  • Scheinfeld
    by Nemorino
  • My photo from 2011
    My photo from 2011
    by Nemorino
  • Street and Catholic church in Scheinfeld
    Street and Catholic church in Scheinfeld
    by Nemorino

Scheinfeld Things to Do

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    1. Scheinfeld from the bike route 3 more images

    by Nemorino Updated Apr 10, 2012

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    The city of Scheinfeld now includes not only the original town of Scheinfeld but also the surrounding villages of Burgambach, Erlabronn, Grappertshofen, Hohlweiler, Klosterdorf, Kornhöfstadt, Neuses, Oberlaimbach, Ruthmannsweiler, Schnodsenbach, Thierberg, Unterlaimbach and Zeisenbronn. All of these together have about 4,700 inhabitants, according to the city’s website.

    Since 1627 Scheinfeld has been a predominantly Catholic town, but during the century before that its religious history was typical for towns in this area.

    The turmoil started in 1524 when the local ruler, Prince Johann the Strong, a member of the von Schwarzenberg family, converted to Protestantism. When this happened: presto! The entire population was suddenly Protestant.

    Like many other aristocratic families, the von Schwarzenberg family had a Protestant branch and a Catholic branch. When the Protestant branch died out, the Catholic side of the family inherited Scheinfeld, with the result that: presto! The entire population was suddenly Catholic again.

    This did not sit well, however, with the Margrave of Mark Brandenburg, a Protestant who was theoretically the feudal lord of this region. So the conflicts went on and on until 1627 (during the Thirty Years War), when Prince Georg Ludwig von Schwarzenberg finally settled the matter in favor of Catholicism. I think it is safe to assume that he did not rely solely on theological arguments to accomplish this.

    Scheinfeld remained more or less exclusively Catholic until after the Second World War, when some German Protestant refugees from Romania (Transylvanian Saxons) settled in Scheinfeld and built a new Protestant church. So now the town has both.

    Another town with a similar religious history is Tauberrettersheim, where the ruling Hohenlohe family first converted to Protestantism but later re-converted (one branch of the family) to Catholicism. So all the residents of the towns where this branch ruled, such as Tauberrettersheim, were required to re-convert to Catholicism, too.

    Second photo: The town gate of Scheinfeld.

    Third photo: A chapel on the way up to the monastery.

    Fourth photo: Perhaps some local person can tell me the name of the saint or bishop in this photo?

    Location of Scheinfeld on Google Maps

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    • Religious Travel

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    by Nemorino Updated Apr 10, 2012

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    This castle on a hill overlooking the town was the traditional residence of the von Schwarzenberg family, or at least whatever branch of the family happened to be the rulers of Scheinfeld at any particular time.

    Parts of the castle now house a private school, which was being renovated when I visited in 2011. The rest of the castle is also in need of renovation, as can be seen in some of my photos which show visible signs of damage due to dampness in some of the walls.

    I was there on a Sunday morning but arrived several hours too early for the weekly guided tour, which is offered on Sunday afternoons at 2 pm from Easter to October.

    This is only one of a dozen or so castles and palaces that the Schwarzenberg family used to own in Germany, Austria and Bohemia (now part of the Czech Republic).

    The current head of the family, Prince Karel VII of Schwarzenberg, is now (as of 2012) the minister of foreign affairs of the Czech Republic.

    Location of Schloss Schwarzenberg in Google Maps.

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    • Castles and Palaces

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    by Nemorino Written Apr 10, 2012

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    This is a Franciscan-Minoriten monastery which was founded in 1866 and is still very much in operation. Currently eight monks (“brothers”) live in the monastery and work mainly in the adjoining educational center, where they offer numerous week-long seminars and courses on a variety of (mainly religious) topics.

    The educational center consists of four modern buildings with three seminar rooms and several smaller rooms for group work and religious services. The center also provides overnight accommodation with 65 beds for the seminar participants.

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Scheinfeld Hotels

Scheinfeld Local Customs

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    by Nemorino Updated Apr 11, 2012

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    After taking a look around the town center, I followed the signs pointing to Klosterdorf and started riding up a street called Adi-Dassler-Straße, without having any idea who Adi Dassler was.

    Even when I came to the Adidas factory at Adi-Dassler-Straße 24, I still didn’t make the connection. It took quite a while before the penny dropped and I finally realized that Adi Dassler was the founder of the company and that the name of the company came from the founder’s nickname, Adi-Das.

    Actually his name was Adolf Dassler (1900-1978), but after the Second World War nobody wanted to be called Adolf any more (though it used to be a very common name), so he stuck with Adi.

    Adidas is a company that is very popular with consumers in Germany, but also often criticized, particularly because they have eliminated many thousands of jobs in Germany and now produce most of their shoes and other sports equipment in low-wage countries like Indonesia, with little regard for the environment or for workers’ rights.

    Reportedly the plant in Scheinfeld is now the only facility in Europe where Adidas actually produces anything. They still make some lines of shoes in Scheinfeld, partly on an assembly line and also custom-made shoes for big-name athletes.

    Scheinfeld is also where Adidas has its highly publicized “vault” containing the originals of all the different shoe types that they have produced in the past sixty years.

    By the way, the global headquarters of the Adidas company is not in Scheinfeld but forty kilometers away in Adi Dassler’s home town of Herzogenaurach, which is also where his older brother Rudolf set up a rival company called Puma on the other side of the river.

    You can read about the bitter rivalry between these two companies on balhannah’s Herzogenaurach page here on VirtualTourist. She says that for decades Herzogenaurach was known as "the town of bent necks", because the townfolk would not strike up a conversation with a stranger until they had first looked down at the shoes that person was wearing. You couldn’t go into certain pubs if you were wearing the wrong shoes. And a Puma person certainly couldn’t marry an Adidas person. Intermarriage was unheard of and would have caused a huge scandal.

    But none of this ever applied to Scheinfeld, which was and still is a purely Adidas town, ever since the Adidas factory was established here in 1959.

    I've read that Adidas is now the world’s second largest supplier of athletic footwear, after Nike but ahead of Reebok and Puma.

    Second photo: The back of the Adidas factory, as seen from the bicycle route.

    Location of the adidas plant on Adi-Dassler-Straße in Scheinfeld.

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    by Nemorino Written Apr 10, 2012

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    After three centuries as a predominantly Catholic town, Scheinfeld has accumulated a number of crucifixes prominently displayed on the roadsides.

    Since I have never been terribly knowledgeable about theological matters, I was puzzled by the letters “J.N.:R.J.” at the top of the cross. But I have since looked them up and found that they mean Jesus Nazarenun Rex Judeorum, which is Latin for "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews."

    These words were written in three languages (Latin, Hebrew or Aramaic and Greek) and were posted at the top of the cross on orders of Pontius Pilate.

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  • Scheinfeld Hotels

    1 Hotels in Scheinfeld

Scheinfeld Warnings and Dangers

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    by Nemorino Written Apr 10, 2012

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    This carefully tended little shrine by the roadside between Kornhöfstadt and Scheinfeld marks the spot where a thirty-year-old local man was killed by a car in 1998.

    In the same year, 1998, the BBC reported that cars cause “more than 500,000 deaths a year, and injure another 15 million people. In 100 years there have been more than 20 million car-related deaths worldwide.”

    The same report said: “Road accidents are the single largest killer of men aged between 15 and 44.”

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Scheinfeld Off The Beaten Path

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    Trail signs in Thierberg

    by Nemorino Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Thierberg is a village up the hill from the monastary, on the way to Frankfurt.

    Marked hiking trails lead off from Thierberg in several directions, as shown by the somewhat rusty trail signs in my photo.

    Thierberg is now officially a district of Scheinfeld, since it is one of the twelve villages which were incorporated into the city of Scheinfeld in the local government reform in 1972.

    Location of Thierberg on Google Maps.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    by Nemorino Updated Apr 10, 2012

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    Although it is only one kilometer from Frankfurt, Kornhöfstadt is officially a district of Scheinfeld, since it is one of the twelve villages which were incorporated into the city of Scheinfeld in the local government reform of 1972.

    Kornhöfstadt has its own listing in the VirtualTourist database. For this reason I thought of doing a separate page on Kornhöfstadt, just to put it on the map so to speak, but I gave up on that idea because I don’t really have much to say about the place. So you can still “Be the first to write about Kornhöfstadt” if you are so inclined.

    It’s a nice little village, with an inn and a bus stop, but all I did there was to ride through on my bicycle on a Sunday morning.

    Location of Kornhöfstadt on Google Maps.

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