Schloss Neuschwanstein Favorites

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    Castle tour: make online reservation – or wait

    by Trekki Updated Sep 14, 2013

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    The ticket centre, July 1st, 2013
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    Favorite thing: So you want to visit Neuschwanstein Castle? Fine! But that’s what approximately 6000 (in words: six thousand) people per day do too. Consequently it is a bit crowded to say least. Although Neuschwanstein’s management is highly efficient and outstandingly organised (hello corporate companies – they are to be your benchmark), they just cannot fit 6000 people into the same tour. In other words: one just cannot appear at the ticket centre and believe that one gets into the castle a couple of minutes later. One will get onto the next available tour, although “next” is relative. It could mean 2-3 hours or even more during high season. And this although there is a tour every 5 – 10 minutes and they will allow approximately 60 – 80 people per tour.

    On a sunny Monday early July (July 1, 2013), not yet German holiday time, I arrived at the ticket centre at 13:30 with approximately 20 people waiting ahead of me. The earliest tour I could get was the one at 16:30. Given 70 people per tour and tours every 5 minutes this meant that more than 2000 people were guided through the castle in between my arrival and my own tour. I didn’t mind to wait these three hours because it was a fabulous sunny day, perfect for taking photos and I did want to visit the new nearby Museum of Bavarian Kings anyhow.

    The reason why I started off being so sarcastic is because I have seen many people in the queue complaining and being aggressive towards the ticket centre staff. Of course VTers would never do that, but would read reviews previous to their visit and get the message. However searchers via Google shall be warned:
    Make an online reservation to ensure that you get on a tour at a desired time or time frame.
    It is easy and costs only 1,80 Euro – less than a bottle of water, a beer or a coffee. However, according to what the staff told me: the earlier one makes the online reservation the higher the chance to get exactly the desired time. Chances will be lower the day before one wants to come and visit the castle. The reservation website seems to be safe, i.e. it is a https one, messages are said to be encrypted and they have a SSL certificate (secure socket layer).
    Update, August 10, 2013:
    For an upcoming visit of friends early October I booked tickets via the reservation website yesterday. Today I received my confirmation, for exactly the time I asked for!
    This is what I call efficient and reliable - a real peace of mind procedure for the visitor!

    Once at the ticket centre, there will be two entries: the one to the right hand side is the one for reserved tickets, the other, bigger one, is the one to buy tickets without having made the reservation. Monitors at the ceiling will tell which tour in which language will be available “next”. I had the feeling that there are more English tours than German tours. In between are tours with audio guide equipment.

    Ticket facts and figures, prices as of July 2013:
    Three kinds of tickets are available, depending on which castles and/or the museum one wants to visit during the stay:
    1) Neuschwanstein Castle or Hohenschwangau Castle:
    Adults: 12 Euro, kids younger than 18 accompanied by a parent are free, seniors, students and disabled people with pass: 11 Euro,

    2) King‘s Ticket = Hohenschwangau and Neuschwanstein Castle:
    Adults: 23 Euro, kids younger than 18 accompanied by a parent are free, seniors, students and disabled people with pass: 21 Euro

    3) Wittelsbach Ticket = Hohenschwangau Castle and Museum of Bavarian Kings:
    Adults: 20 Euro, kids 0 – 5 years are free, kids 8 – 18 years: 8 Euro, seniors, students and disabled people with pass: 18 Euro

    4) Swan Ticket = Hohenschwangau and Neuschwanstein Castle and Museum of Bavarian Kings:
    Adults: 29,50 Euro, kids 0 – 5 years are free, kids 8 – 18 years: 8 Euro, seniors, students and disabled people with pass: 28 Euro

    Conclusion:
    • Plan your trip,
    • Decide which of the castles you want to visit, and if you also want to visit the Museum of Bavarian Kings,
    • Make an online reservation,
    • Plan enough time to “get up”, either by walking, by taking a bus or a carriage,
    • Be nice to the staff – given the amount of people they have to deal with per day they seem to have unlimited patience!

    Opening hours of the ticket centre:
    Summer (end of March - mid October): 08:00 - 17:30
    Winter (mid October - end of March): 09:00 - 15:30

    Opening hours of the castle = guided tours through the castle:
    Summer (end of March - mid October): 09:00 - 18:00
    Winter (mid October - end of March): 10:00 - 16:00

    The castle is closed during New Year (December 31st and January 1st) and Christmas (December 24 and 25).

    Location of Ticket Centre on Google Maps.

    (Continue here =>) Now it is time to learn a little bit more about the creator of this castle King Ludwig II of Bavaria

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    King Ludwig II - enlightened and creative

    by Trekki Updated Sep 10, 2013

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    Favorite thing: For sure, King Ludwig II is the best known German worldwide, with millions of people visiting his castles every year. Outside of Germany he is often being called “Mad King”, which makes me furious and sad because it is based on the thirsty sensationalism of tabloids already since ages, and obviously fuelled by “journalists” and “authors” who just repeat what was said. (Which is why I do not link the English Wikipedia article here, because the “authors” repeat this sensationalism) He was different, yes, but who has the right to call someone mad just because he or she is different. Who are we and who are the unethical reporters or journalists to judge that someone who is different is being called mad? And what is "different"? Just because someone does not follow the faceless masses but has his or her own dreams, visions, values?

    King Ludwig II certainly had a lot of influence on art and the cultural development of his time and also of today. He was a nature lover, sensitive and sensible, a creative and visionary person, who had already a lot of the most modern technology of the time being installed in his buildings, technology which became standard only many years later. And he has my sympathy because he cared for art and culture and not for the hunt for power expressed through wars.

    King Ludwig II is still much loved in Bavaria. People in Oberammergau celebrate his birthday, August 25th, with so-called König-Ludwig-Feuer, mountain fires showing crown and cross and the letters L II on the evening before (video => here), and all over in Bavaria the day is celebrated. On the day of his death, June 13th, people still mourn. His tomb in St Michael, Munich, is always adorned with fresh flowers.

    Pay him respect when you visit the castles. Remember that he never wanted strangers to see his rooms - which exactly we will do daily. Don’t call him mad and don’t discuss his private life. This is not our business, like our own private life is not the business of someone else. One of the people in my castle tour started to make silly jokes about him when we were in the Royal bedroom. I was amazed how patient our guide was, but I could see her tension. I made a remark myself and asked him if he would be a so-called reporter of “Bild” magazine, the dirty German version of maybe the greasy “The Sun” in UK or US’ “New York Post”...... That made him shut up.

    Think of the king as someone who gave you what you see now, what you have seen or what you will see – beautiful castles. I have deep sympathy for anyone who is a lateral thinker and visionary. This simply because I have this tendency too and was long seen as an idiot in a former work environment where my ideas had been judged as too creative and too “abnormal” by people who like to stick to stone-age-old procedures and who are afraid of changes. But who implemented just the same ideas years later.....

    I was delighted to read that German banks have issued a 2 Euro special coin in year 2012 with Neuschwanstein Castle on one side. And of course I have one and won't spend it but just keep it :-)

    (Continue here =>) Before moving up to the castle make sure you visit the excellent Museum of Bavarian Kings

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    While we are being guided through the castle.....

    by Trekki Updated Sep 4, 2013

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    Favorite thing: So we’ve bought our tickets, have made your way uphill and reached the castle courtyard. It most probably will be crowded but it is still easy to see the electronic board or monitor where the upcoming tour numbers and entries are displayed. And again there is a sign that tells about the rules: no photos, no smoking, no videos, no dogs, no mobiles, and no baby buggies. In addition the sign will tell to be aware of your tour number, which is printed on the ticket (right hand side) and to leave baby buggies, big backpacks and other bulky objects in the check room. It is wise to check beforehand if your backpack is too big, beforehand meaning well before the tour starts. I was unsure about my daypack, so I asked but was told that I don’t need to leave it in the check room. Once the tour number is being displayed on the monitor, the entry gates can be opened by sliding the ticket’s bar code into the gate device.
    And then the tour starts....

    July 1st, 2013, at 16:30, our group was very lucky to have Mrs. König as our guide. She is excellent, and although our group was rather big with approx. 65 people, she was patient, attentive, especially with the little kids whom she addressed as princesses and princes. She explained each room and its details very lively and with passion and answered every question with patience and an excellent knowledge. Thank you again Mrs. König for making my tour splendid and very memorable.

    The reason why I write about her and “how to tour through the castle” is very simple. Wherever masses accumulate, there is a tendency to behave borderline: pushing, egoistic, dawdling, being rude, being loud and other inappropriate behaviour. Pushing isn’t really necessary because everyone with a specific ticket number will get on this specific tour, provided he is at the entrance in time. The organisation of the castle management is excellent. They handle us masses of visitors – approx. 2000 per day in winter and as much as 8000 per day in high season – very efficient and provide tours every 5 minutes! Consequently this means that approx. 60 – 80 people will be packed into one tour. Without a bit of discipline it can be a nightmare. So we will behave appropriate: not chatting while the guide explains, because most of the people want to listen what the guide tells and not to other people’s stories. There is time enough to chat when we move from room to room or from floor to floor. Dawdling is also not such a good idea; remember that there is a tour behind us. In the rooms and hallways are several chairs and benches. All have signs “Do not sit here”. How precise is that? It means not to sit there because these are parts of the original furniture. And of course, while chewing gum might look cool in parts of the world, here is definitely not the place to dispose of the gum! I was shocked to read that spit-out chewing gum in the rooms and hallways is one of the main obstacles for the cleaning personnel! How outrageous is that?? I hope that the castle management will maybe adapt Singapore’s rules one day where people who spit chewing gum onto the street could be fined with up to 500 Euro :-) For the ones who need to dispose of their gum, I can highly recommend to travel to London, where gum is being transformed into street art :-)

    I am sarcastic again. But I saw people trying to get into the castle although being late. I was astonished about the guard who let them in despite their massive delay. I am almost sure that delayed people will be sent back in high season. Is that really worth it? Paid tickets but no visit because one does not observe the rules? I saw people with carry-ons who tried to get through the tour entrance and who looked baffled that the guards sent them to the storage room. Some in our group continued to chat all the time, which was really very distractive. And I saw people sitting on benches although our guide told them several times to get off.

    Conclusion:
    * Be in time,
    * Ask about your luggage before the entry time,
    * Listen to the guide,
    * Don’t push, don’t dawdle,
    * If you need to rest in between, bring one of these little folding chairs,
    * Appreciate that it is not a Disneyland building but a Bavarian Castle and real,
    * Understand that the state of Bavaria is the owner and sets the rules,
    * Bring back what you take in (gum, bottles, garbage).

    Location of “The tour starts here” on Google Maps.

    (Continue here =>) But now what we came for - Neuschwanstein Castle, inside.

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    Neuschwanstein Castle: photo & video taking policy

    by Trekki Updated Sep 4, 2013

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    Favorite thing: Inside Neuschwanstein Castle, during the tour, the policy is quite clear: no photos, no videos (and no mobile phones, no smoking, no pets). This is written almost anywhere, it is shown in little pictograms – which are international - and the tour guide will mention it at the beginning of the tour. Our guide said something similar to “no photos because of copyright reasons”. I asked her what this exactly means and who would be the one who owns the copyright. She explained that the state of Bavaria is the owner of the castle; hence the one who decides upon what is allowed on its property and what not. She also said that some colleagues of her would simply throw out visitors who, despite upon several requests not to take photos, are still insisting to do so. In cases when visitors behave even doggedly, they might be banned from the entire premises of Bavaria’s state-owned palaces, gardens and lakes. This includes Linderhof Palace, Herrenchiemsee Palace and many others.

    So if the state of Bavaria decides that photos and videos of the castle interior are forbidden, then it is his entire right to do so. He has the domestic authority. Period.

    The castle guides are the ones to whom the state of Bavaria has transferred the power to exercise the property rights.

    And yes, of course, this implies that, if we wish to have photos of the interior, we must buy postcards or brochures. Nevertheless, these also hold a copyright and hence it is also illegal to scan these and publish them. And yes, of course the state of Bavaria will also earn money through this. But if this is how it works, then who are we to object and howl? The state opens its premises to us for visits.

    I belong to the group of people who are sad when photography is not allowed, but then I realised that I will be more attentive and listen to a guide when I can’t take photos. Taking photos would distract me from listening to the explanations. And on the other hand – I have started to understand these rights. I would not want my rights to be infringed.

    Conclusion:
    Be aware that photos and videos are not allowed, accept it, and enjoy the tour rather than being miffed about the chance not to take photos. You are not alone – approx. 6000 people per day would want to take photos of the inside.

    (Continue here =>) And then some considerations about the “behaviour” before and during the castle tour.

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    Viewpoints - we all want THE photos, don't we?

    by Trekki Updated Sep 4, 2013

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    Favorite thing: We all want these gorgeous photos of Neuschwanstein Castle and its surroundings. Don’t we? And it is easy to be successful, in any kind of weather. When I was there early July 2013 I was blessed with sunshine and blue sky, but I imagine that the castle and surroundings would also look marvellous in misty weather.

    The good news is also that by now all scaffolding has been removed. The restoring work is completed for now.

    Ok, so where are the viewpoints?
    To start off, already approaching the castle from Füssen or Schwangau will provide several small lay-bys for a short photo stop, albeit one needs a good tele lens for appropriate photos:
    Füssener Strasse, lay-bys.

    Nice views are possible between Hotel Lisl (where the busses leave) and Lake Alpsee. But again a good tele lens is needed to achieve close-up photos of the castle’s western façade. When I was waiting for my tour to begin, I went to the Museum of Bavarian Kings and was sitting on the little stone wall for a while to take in the whole atmosphere and just enjoy the views. This is where I took the photo of Hohenschwangau Castle (last photo):
    viewpoint in front of the Museum of Bavarian Kings.

    The classic photo of course is possible on Marienbrücke, up on the hill, just a couple of metres off the bus stop. Be aware that this involves a bit of uphill walking, albeit on a rather broad path. And be aware that one is not alone there but hundreds of people might already wait to step onto the bridge for the photo:
    Marienbrücke.

    Further on the walking path to the castle entrance there is another little viewpoint, ideal to take photos of the surroundings, especially nearby Forggensee with the village of Schwangau in the foreground, of Hohenschwangau Castle and of the two lakes nearby, Lake Alpsee and Schwansee:
    viewpoint on the walking path to the castle.

    My favourite viewpoint though is the western balcony, the one which is accessible to the public. One reaches this balcony after the castle tour, on the way out. It is on the same level as the café and one of the souvenir shops. It seemed that not many visitors either find it or take their time to step out on the balcony because it was rather empty when I was there – given the many people inside otherwise. It was here where I took the first three photos above. The advantage of this balcony over the viewpoint on the way to the castle is quite simple: it is located higher hence the views will be better. And it was here where I fully understood Ludwig II’s motivation to build his castle exactly here: the views of the surrounding mountains are most spectacular:
    castle’s western balcony.

    But since I was only here once so far, I recommend reading also @Brendareed’s tip as of where to get the best photos. She spent more time in the region and also visited Hohenschwangau Castle, which I did not up to now.

    (Continue here =>) Now we move up to the castle, by bus, carriage or walking uphill.

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    Visiting the castle as daytrip arriving by plane?

    by Trekki Updated Aug 3, 2013

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    Favorite thing: Quite often I see questions in our travel forum like “can I visit Neuschwanstein as a day trip from Munich after having arrived by plane?” So I thought I’d write some words about this too.

    As simple as it is but the answer is yes and no. It all depends on the arrival time at Munich’s airport (the earlier the better) and moreover, online reservation for the castle visit is crucial, in other words a “must”.

    Munich Airport – Munich main train station (Hauptbahnhof):
    Two tram lines, S1 and S8, connect the airport with the main train station. Trams leave every 20 minutes, the travel time is 46 minutes for S1 and 42 minutes for S8. S1’s schedule is at xx:31 (arrival at yy:17), xx:51 (arrival at yy:37), xx:11 (arrival at xx:57).
    S8’s schedule is at xx:04 (arrival at xx:46), xx:24 (arrival at yy:06), xx:44 (arrival at yy:26).
    Website: MVV (Munich’s transport association).

    Munich main train station (Hauptbahnhof) – Füssen train station:
    The journey takes approx. 2 hours, trains leave every hour at xx:52. The ones at 07:52 (-> 09:56), 09:52 (-> 11:54), 11:52 (-> 13:57), 13:52 (-> 15:56) and 15:52 (-> 17:55) are direct trains, the ones at 06:52 (-> 08:55), 08:52 (-> 10:55), 10:52 (-> 12:55), 12:52 (-> 14:55) and 14:52 (-> 16:56) involve one change in Buchloe (resp. Kaufbeuren for the 14:52 train).
    Website: Bahn

    Füssen train station – Hohenschwangau by bus:
    Duration approx. 6-7 minutes. Two busses are at disposal:
    Bus no. 73 from Füssen to Steingaden: at 09:45, 10:05, 11:05, 12:30, 12:45, 13:05, 14:10, 15:05, 16:05, 16:25, 17:05,
    Bus no. 78 from Füssen to Schwangau or Tegelbergbahn. This one is running more frequently: 09:05, 09:45, 10:05, 10:15, 11:05, 11:35, 12:05, 12:15, 12:30, 12:45, 13:05, 14:10, 15:05, 16:05, 16:25, 17:05.

    Calculating approx. 30 min from arrival at the airport until the tram platform, and additional 30-40 minutes in Hohenschwangau to get the tickets, take the bus up to the uphill bus stop and walk to the castle this means:
    It is doable only if you arrive latest 13:00 in Munich’s airport and have made an online reservation for the ticket and got your desired time slot, smooth transitions provided.

    Trains from Füssen back to Munich leave at e.g. 18:06 (-> 20:05) and 19:05 (-> 21:36).

    The same trip but arriving at Frankfurt International Airport is also doable, although it involves a long train journey. It makes sense for flights arriving not later than 11:00, with approx. 1 hour calculation time to get out of the plane and into the train. Frankfurt Airport is bigger than Munich’s airport. Train times from Frankfurt to Füssen are, from the airport platform: 06:53 (-> 11:50), 07:37 (-> 13:57), 08:53 (-> 13:37), 09:53 (-> 14:55), 10:53 (-> 15:56) and 11:53 (-> 16:56).

    Schedules as of July 2013. They might change after October, when Bahn changes schedules.

    (=>) This is the end of my description of Neuschwanstein Castle and its surroundings. Thank you for having followed my tour.
    If you wish, please return to my Intro page.

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    Go to the bathroom before you move up!

    by Trekki Updated Aug 3, 2013

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    Favorite thing: When one has to go, one has to go. That’s natural. But I found that it is better to look for bathrooms before moving up to the castle. The bottleneck for visiting the castle is the courtyard, where we all have to wait until our tour starts. There is a bathroom located here, in the entrance arch. But it only has two toilets (the one for girls), so lines might be long when it is crowded. Once inside the castle, during the tour, there are no bathrooms, but when the tour is finished and the path leads down through the castle, there are again several bathrooms.

    One big bathroom is located at the crossroads of the entrance area, next to the information centre Hohenschwangau. It costs a fee of 0,50 Euro though.

    In case you want to read about and save in your trip planner the other locations, please check @Brendareed’s review. She has listed every location because she visits the region quite often.

    Location of the information centre Hohenschwangau and bathrooms on Google Maps.

    (Continue here =>) Some more considerations during the visit: pack good shoes.

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    Nice arrangements for up to 4 days possible :-)

    by Trekki Updated Aug 3, 2013

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    Favorite thing: For visitors who don’t have the tightest schedule and don’t want to see Europe in 5 days or try to pack 10 villages and castles into one day, the arrangements provided by Hohenschwangau’s hotels might be of interest. I myself am pondering over booking the winter arrangement for early 2014 because it is the most reasonable of all and because I would love to see the region and the castle of course as a winter fairy tale.

    These arrangements are offered by Hotel Lisl and Villa Jägerhaus and involve either two or four nights with breakfast and half board (one resp. two dinners in Hotel Lisl and one resp. two dinners in nearby Restaurant Alpenrose, which is located very picturesquely at Lake Alpsee – see photos). Depending on the arrangement, tickets for the castles are included. The two nights stay cover only Hohenschwangau Castle and the Museum of Bavarian Kings while the four nights stays additionally cover Neuschwanstein Castle.

    My favourite arrangement is the Winter Fairytale, 4 nights and breakfast in Hotel Lisl, 2 dinners in Hotel Lisl and 2 in Restaurant Alpenrose, tickets to Neuschwanstein Castle, Hohenschwangau Castle and Museum of Bavarian Kings for 255 Euro, available from January 1st to March 31. Since I can’t stop doing calculations and comparisons, here it is for this arrangement: single tickets for the castles are: 12 Euro each for Neuschwanstein and Hohenschwangau Castle, 9,50 Euro for the musem = 33,50 Euro. This subtracted from the arrangement price makes 221,50 Euro for the four nights breakfast and half board or 55,40 Euro per person per day. Otherwise, without booking such an arrangement, double rooms in Hotel Lisl are from 85 – 115 Euro plus 14 Euro for beeakfast buffet per person, or 56,50 Euro resp. 71,50 Euro per person per night including breakfast. So the price without dinner is even higher than the calculated price of the arrangement.

    Other arrangements are:
    Midsumer Night’s Dream (June 1st to October 31st): 4 nights, breakfast, dinners, both castles and Museum of Bavarian Kings, for 375 Euro (Hotel Lisl) or 455 Euro (Villa Jägerhaus);
    Spring Awakening (April 1st to May 31st): 4 nights, breakfast, dinners, both castles and Museum of Bavarian Kings, for 305 Euro (Hotel Lisl) or 355 Euro (Villa Jägerhaus);
    King Ludwig II Summer Tour (April 1st to October 31st): 2 nights, breakfast, dinners, Hohenschwangau Castle, Museum of Bavarian Kings and carriage ride, for 320 Euro (Hotel Lisl), 375 Euro (Villa Jägerhaus), 248 Euro (Hotel Schwangauer Hof), 238 Euro (Hotel Schlossblick);
    King Ludwig II Winter Tour (January 1st to March 31st and November 1st to December 29th): 2 nights, breakfast, dinners, Hohenschwangau Castle, Museum of Bavarian Kings and carriage ride, for 285 Euro (Hotel Lisl), 320 Euro (Villa Jägerhaus), 238 Euro (Hotel Schwangauer Hof), 228 Euro (Hotel Schlossblick);
    Be King yourself for two days (January 1st to December 29th): 2 nights, breakfast, dinners, both castles and Museum of Bavarian Kings, for 218 Euro (Hotel Lisl), 284 Euro (Villa Jägerhaus).

    There is also a New Year’s Eve arrangement, albeit it is only published on the German page: 3 nights, breakfast, dinners, one New Year’s Eve dinner, Hohenschwangau Castle, Museum of Bavarian Kings and carriage ride, for 250 Euro (Hotel Schlossblick);

    (The hotels' websites are linked within the links above).

    (Continue here =>) Some more considerations during the visit: look for bathrooms before you make your way up.

    © Ingrid D., July 2013 (so please do not copy my text or photos without my permission).

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    Few words in German

    by ealgisi Written Jan 5, 2010

    Favorite thing: Below you will find few useful words you can use while traveling in Germany:

    Hello = Hallo
    Good day = Guten Tag / Morgen
    Good evening = Guten Abend
    Good night = Gute Nacht
    Hi = Hi / Tag
    Good bye = Auf Wiedersehen
    Bye = Tschüß
    See you soon = Bis bald
    Please = Bitte
    Thank you (very much) = Danke (schön) / (Vielen Dank)
    Excuse me = Entschuldigung Sie bitte
    Yes = Ja
    No = Nein
    That depends = Das kommt darauf an
    I don't know = Ich weiß nicht
    I don't think so = Das glaube ich nicht
    I suppose so = Ich nehme an
    I think so = Ich glaube schon
    It doesn't matter = Es macht nichts
    I don't mind = Es ist mir egal / gleich
    Of course = Natürlich
    True = Richtig / Das ist wahr
    With pleasure = Mit Vergnügen
    I don't understand. = Ich verstehe Sie nicht.
    Please speak slower. = Sprechen Sie bitte etwas langsamer.
    Would you write that down please. = Könnten Sie das bitte aufschreiben.
    Could you explain that please. = Könnten Sie das bitte erklären.
    How is that pronounced? = Wie spricht man das aus?
    I have forgotten the word for... = Ich habe das Wort für... vergessen.
    How do you say that in English / German? = Wie sagt man das in Englisch / Deutsch?
    What does that mean? = Was bedeutet das?
    Can you repeat that please. = Könnten Sie das bitte wiederholen.
    I don't understand. = Ich verstehe Sie nicht.
    Please speak slower. = Sprechen Sie bitte etwas langsamer.
    Would you write that down please. = Könnten Sie das bitte aufschreiben.
    Could you explain that please. = Könnten Sie das bitte erklären.
    How is that pronounced? = Wie spricht man das aus?
    I have forgotten the word for... = Ich habe das Wort für... vergessen.
    How do you say that in English / German? = Wie sagt man das in Englisch / Deutsch?
    What does that mean? = Was bedeutet das?
    Can you repeat that please. = Könnten Sie das bitte wiederholen.

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    Useful phone numbers

    by ealgisi Updated Jan 5, 2010

    Favorite thing: The most common European emergency number 112 (following Directive 2002/22/EC: Universal Service Directive) and also standard on GSM mobile phones. 112 is used in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Republic of Macedonia, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom in addition to their other emergency numbers.

    Here are some useful phone numbers that you might need while in Germany:

    Police: 110

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    Neuschwanstein Castle - Disneyland Castle

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2007

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    Neuschwanstein Castle - Disneyland Castle

    Favorite thing: The first sensation which pursues tourists who have seen the castle for the first time, of that they somewhere already saw it. Many people consider that they saw it in the Disneyland. They are right, but only partly.

    Neuschwanstein served as the inspiration for the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland in Paris. The inspiration for the Cinderella Castles at other Disney parks is sometimes incorrectly attributed to Neuschwanstein. The French Chateau d'Usse was used as a prototype for this purpose.

    I was wrong when I compared it with the castle in the Tokyo Disneyland which I visited in 1993.

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    Tickets price

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2007

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    Neushwanstein - Ticket
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    Favorite thing: Hohenschwangau Castle - Neuschwanstein Castle
    Ticket prices “King's Ticket”
    Visiting both Hohenschwangau and Neuschwanstein Castle on the same day, starting with Hohenschwangau castle
    Adults € 17.00
    Pupils, Students, Military Service and Alternative Service € 15.00
    Visitors over 65 years of age and disabled visitors when showing valid identification.
    Groups, at least 15 members € 15.00.

    Ticket prices “Neuschwanstein Castle”
    Adults € 9,00
    Pupils, Students, Military Service and Alternative Service € 8,00
    Visitors over 65 years of age and disabled visitors when showing valid identification
    Groups, at least 15 members € 8.00
    (This discount only applies if all tickets are bought and paid for at one time by one person.)
    Children under 18 years of age free.

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    Ticket sale

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2007

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    Hohenschwangau - Ticket-Centre
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    Favorite thing: Tickets for the Royal Castles are available exclusively from the Ticket-Center. Tour number and time of entrance to the Castle are printed on the tickets.
    Visitors may receive detailed information on possible entrance times to the Royal Castles in the Ticket-Center. You may receive tickets with time of entrance to the castle noted on the ticket. This is the time when you are required to be at the turnstile where the Castle entrance is. Your ticket is only valid on the same day for the tour specified.

    Ticket sale times for Neuschwanstein Castle
    between April 01 and September 30
    Monday to Sunday 8:00 am until 5:00 pm
    between October 01 and March 31
    Monday to Sunday 9:00 am until 3:00 pm

    Ticket sale times for Hohenschwangau Castle
    between April 01 and September 30
    Monday to Sunday 8:00 am until 5:30 pm
    between October 01 and March 31
    Monday to Sunday 9:00 am until 3:30 pm

    During the tour, you go 165 steps upstairs and 181 steps downstairs.
    Duration of the tour approx. 35 minutes.

    Official websights Neuschwanstein Castle and Neuschwanstein

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    New 7 Wonders of the World

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2007

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    Neuschwanstein-New 7 Wonders of the World

    Favorite thing: Neuschwanstein Castle has the chance to belong to the "New 7 Wonders of the World". It's the only candidate from Germany.

    Together with the Statue of Liberty, the Kremlin, the Acropolis, the Colosseum and the Great Wall of China the world famous castle is among the 21 finalists of the vote initiated by the New7Wonders Foundation.

    If I was a judge, I'd consider the castle to deserve being include into this list.

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    Neuschwanstein Castle History

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2007

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    New Hohenschwangau Castle - Neuschwanstein
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    Favorite thing: In 1867 Ludwig II – the Bavarian king visited the recently "rebuilt" Wartburg castle in Thuringia . They say he was particularly inspired by the Singers' Hall, allegedly the location of the legendary "Singers' Contest".

    Wartburg castle and its hall became the leitmotif of the most impressive Ludwig’s castle which he gave the name of "New Hohenschwangau Castle". It only acquired the name of "Neuschwanstein" after the death of the king. He invited the architect Eduard Riedel and the painter Christian Jank. They also had to process Ludwig’s ideas in stone and interior.

    The castle was not built as rapidly as the king expected. The project was too comprehensive and the building site on the mountain presented difficulties. A lot of designers, architects and artisans implemented the king's detailed ideas.

    Official websight Neuschwanstein Castle and Neuschwanstein

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Comments (1)

  • JyrkiS's Profile Photo
    Apr 15, 2013 at 6:17 PM

    The setting and interior in absolute stunnin. Di you know that Ludwig II wanted to be everything by HIS god Richard Wagner.
    Look for wikipedia, Ludwig II

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