Food and Drink, Hamburg

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  • Tent view from one of the canal bridges
    Tent view from one of the canal bridges
    by ericaj.
  • Concert artists transported by boat to MainStage
    Concert artists transported by boat to...
    by ericaj.
  • Latin jazz explosion at Duckstein-Hamburg
    Latin jazz explosion at...
    by ericaj.
  • chancay's Profile Photo

    Fischbrötchen (fresh fish in bread roll)

    by chancay Written Nov 8, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A typical one:

    Of course not only in Hamburg, but especially in the harbour cities you get everywhere delicious fish dishes and snacks like bread rolls filled with different fishes , e.g heering, salmon, pollack and much more like you want it.

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    JULY-AUGUST: Duckstein Food and Music Festival

    by ericaj. Updated Aug 17, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Seating for the free concert performances
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    The annual 10 day, 3 city festival presented by Duckstein Beer corporation celebrating art,culture, and cuisine. The weekend features full days of music concerts from acclaimed local and national music acts, as well as other stages featuring performance artists, comedy, acrobats, and children's activities. Artisans and the city's most popular restaurants set up kiosks selling everything from gemstone jewelry, to exotic food from around the globe. There is also, of course, plenty of wine and sekt dealers present, and an abundance of Duckstein Beer.

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    • Festivals
    • Beer Tasting

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    Hamburger

    by Blatherwick Written Dec 19, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hamburger

    Don't tell me that you didn't consider this. Yep, I had a hamburger in hamburg. Although Hamburg is jokingly said to be the birthplace of the hamburger, this is just a myth. The hamburger was named after Hamburg. Original Hamburg dishes are "Birnen, Bohnen und Speck" (green runner beans cooked with pears and bacon), "Aalsuppe" (eel soup), "Bratkartoffeln", "Finkenwerder Scholle" (fried plaice), Pannfisch (fried fish), Rote Grütze (something similar to summer pudding consisting mainly of red berries) and "Labskaus".

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    Drink the local Beer - Astra

    by weewatty Written May 10, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Enjoying an Al Fresco Astra

    Whilst in Hamburg i would have to confess to drinking my fair share of the fine local beer, Astra.

    A refreshingly light lager which is readily available and relatively inexpensive throughout Hamburg.

    The consequences of having say 5 or 6 pints show that although light tasting the alcoholic content may be quite high.

    Check out their rather bizarre website, better if you speak German but still amusing regardless.

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    • Beer Tasting
    • Budget Travel

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    You know Germans look quite...

    by mauro_pd Written Aug 24, 2002

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You know Germans look quite strange zometimez and they eat strange stuff ... but this is the strangest I've ever seen !!! After this bad pic we went for eating this colored fruit (cause u have to know Frau Fraedrich cannot avoid shopping when she gets in touch with strange stuff :-) and it was not so bad ... I guess Germans are not so bad as well choosing their food ...

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  • ericaj.'s Profile Photo

    Arriving November? Enjoy Traditional Roast Goose!

    by ericaj. Written Jan 5, 2014

    During the month of November you may notice an abundance of fresh geese and roast goose in your local supermarkets, bistros, and pubs. Very popular in Germany, traditional roast goose is not only served for forthcoming Christmas celebrations, but also in honor of St. Martin's Day on November 11th (though you can find it nearly everywhere on menus far and wide for the entire month). Given the ready access to and large popularity of the dish, you can often find it served for about 12 Euros (depending on the restaurant) with traditional side dishes of knödel (large dumplings that slightly resemble Matzoh balls) and red cabbage (often mixed with diced pieces of locally grown apples). It's a wonderfully rich and filling way to begin the culinary part of the winter holiday season, and helps to jumpstart getting in the mood for Christmas.

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    • Historical Travel

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    As Spring Arrives, Enjoy the Art of Erdbeerplunder

    by ericaj. Written Mar 22, 2014

    Typically, when people think of German cuisine, they normally think of cliché stand-bys like Wiener Schnitzel, Sauerkraut, and Sausages. But while those foods definitely play a very important part of the heritage and culinary landscape of Germany, it leaves too much room for oversight of dishes where German culture truly shines. One such example? German desserts and the art of "Kaffezeit" or simply "Coffeetime", a time to sit and enjoy coffee and baked sweets utilizing country's talent for creating some of the most stellar desserts to ever grace a table. As the time of writing this post, we are slowly inching towards spring, and with that, the arrival of Strawberry Season will soon be upon us; with that, strawberry themed cakes and pastries are slowly beginning to show up as the dessert feature in the local bakeries after a long, dark winter, signaling the warm months ahead. One such pastry is the traditional Erdbeerplunder , or Strawberry Danish, which actually isn't Danish at all in origin, but descended from Germany's Austrian neighbors and later imported to Denmark by Austrian immigrants in the mid 1800's. The Erdbeerplunder tastes nothing like the American style danish as we know it in the United States: the pastry is light and airy with a buttery taste that melts in the mouth, filled with a bourbon vanilla cream that tastes like heaven, and it is topped with fresh strawberries rather than processed (over-sugared) fruit preserves.

    Whether you're in Germany solo, as a group or as the guest of someone, one of the nicest things you can do for yourself, your friends, or host is to purchase a few Erdbeerplunder as a "Kaffeezeit" gift for the weekend; and you can sit and enjoy these light, flaky pastries filled with a light creme and topped with glazed Strawberries over a cup of coffee or tea. The great thing about Hamburg bakeries is that a good number of them are open for a limited time on Sundays in the more heavily populated areas of town (making it one of the few things open outside the main train stations). You could also just pick some up on a Saturday to present as a thank-you gift to friends hosting you in town.

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    Try 'Labskaus' Hamburgs...

    by Keule21 Written Aug 24, 2002

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Try 'Labskaus' Hamburgs national dish. It looks not really like something that can be eaten, but made by a cook who knows what he's doing, it's delicious!

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