Unique Places in Hamburg

  • Airbus, Hamburg, Germany
    Airbus, Hamburg, Germany
    by TrendsetterME
  • Airbus, Hamburg, Germany
    Airbus, Hamburg, Germany
    by TrendsetterME
  • Building of the Bismarck - Foundation
    Building of the Bismarck - Foundation
    by Airpunk

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Hamburg

  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Airbus, Hamburg, Germany

    by TrendsetterME Updated Jun 2, 2013

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    Hamburg is the second-largest city in Germany and the seventh-largest city in the European Union. The city is home to over 1.8 million people, while the Hamburg Metropolitan Region (including parts of the neighbouring Federal States of Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein) has more than 4.3 million inhabitants.

    Situated on the river Elbe, the port of Hamburg is the second largest port in Europe (after the Port of Rotterdam) and it is among the twenty largest in the world.

    Hamburg is a major transport hub in Northern Germany and is one of the most affluent cities in Europe. It has become a media and industrial centre, with plants and facilities belonging to "AIRBUS", Blohm + Voss and Aus.

    Airbus has a workforce of 13.240 pax in Hamburg (Finkenwerder, Stade, Buxtehude) in FAL (Final Assembly Line) and also a Training Center.

    Airbus, Hamburg, Germany Airbus, Hamburg, Germany Airbus, Hamburg, Germany Airbus, Hamburg, Germany Airbus, Hamburg, Germany
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    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Business Travel

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    Waiting out the rain

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 12, 2012

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    On my last evening in Hamburg we had two short but drenching rainstorms. The first one was when I was eating supper in the fish restaurant by the harbor. When the rain stopped I took a ride from St. Pauli over to Altona, and at some point it started raining again.

    I had my rain gear with me, but in a really pounding rain even the best rain cape and rain trousers aren’t enough, so I took refuge under an overhanging roof of a warehouse of some sort near the Schillerstraße in Altona and waited for the rain to let up.

    While I was waiting a teenage couple came along trying to maintain control of an umbrella that kept blowing around wildly in the wind. Finally a strong gust of wind turned the umbrella completely inside out, so they gave up on it and just stood in the pouring rain and had a long kiss. I was of course too discreet to take any photos of this.

    GPS 53°33'2.55" North; 9°56'18.81" East

    Next review: Cycling in Hamburg

    Related to:
    • Cycling

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Wandsbeker Gehölz

    by Nemorino Written Feb 8, 2012

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    On one of my days in Hamburg I went to visit someone in a district called Rahlstedt, which is at the far eastern end of the city.

    With the help of my ADFC cycling map I found my way there through the districts of St. Georg, Eilbek, Marienthal and Jenfeld.

    In Marienthal my route went through a pleasant patch of woods called the Wandsbeker Gehölz, with lots of paths for walking, cycling and jogging.

    GPS 53°34'15.16" North; 10° 4'29.20" East

    Next review: Wandse creek

    Wandsbeker Geh��lz
    Related to:
    • Cycling

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    Wandse creek

    by Nemorino Written Feb 8, 2012

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    My friend in Rahlsted showed me on the map how to get to the Wandse creek, where there are cycling and walking paths leading downstream all the way to the Außenalster, near the center of Hamburg.

    A sign along the way said that the Wandse, which today is only a small creek, provided water power starting in the 14th century to run up to eight mills. Today the mills are gone but some of the mill ponds still exist.

    Second photo: Bridge over Wandse Creek.

    Third and fourth photos: Where the Wandse Creek widens into a pond.

    Fifth photo: Cycling and jogging by the Wandse.

    GPS 53°35'1.96" North; 10° 6'25.66" East

    Next review: Eilbek and Mundsburger Canals

    Related to:
    • Cycling

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    Eilbek and Mundsburger Canals

    by Nemorino Written Feb 8, 2012

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    In the nineteenth century the lower part of the Wandse creek, starting at Maxstraße, was turned into a canal called the Eilbek Canal.

    It then widens into a pond called the Kuhmühlenteich (literally: Cow Mill Pond) and after that it becomes the Mundsburger Canal for the last 600 meters until it flows into the Außenalster.

    Second photo: Houseboats on the Mundsburger Canal.

    Third and fourth photos: Cycling on the street where the Mundsburger Canal flows into the Außenalster.

    GPS 53°33'56.09" North; 10° 1'5.83" East

    Next: Waiting out the rain

    1. By the Wandse 2. Houseboats on the Mundsburger Canal 3. Near the Mundsburger Canal 4. Near the Mundsburger Canal
    Related to:
    • Cycling

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    Domplatz and Hammaburg

    by nepalgoods Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The socalled Domplatz has been a parking space for many years. The old Kathedral, which has been here since 11th century has been torn down in the beginning of the 19th century. After that a big school has been build on that spot. The Johanneum. But this has been destroyed in the bombs of WWII. Now Hamburg wants to close this big gap between the church St Petri and the Hafencity. Before a very modern building will be erected, the archaeologists take the opportunity to try and find Hammaburg. Hammaburg is said to be the ancient origin of Hamburg, a small fortified settlement of the 10th century, which is assumed to have existed right on today's Domplatz.

    Until now the archaeologists have found the traces of many ancient fortifications. But non of them has been identified as remains of the Hammaburg.

    The excavations are now finished and cannot be visited anymore. Hammaburg has not been found.

    St Petri and the excavations in front Sceletons of 16th or 17th century
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Friedhof Ohlsdorf

    by tini58de Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Even if it sounds strange, but the cemetary in Ohlsdorf is such a wonderful and interesting place to be. It is Hamburg's biggest park and the biggest cemetary worldwide! It is so huge that they even have two buses running with several stops throughout the cemetary.

    There is an information center right at the main entrance in Ohlsdorf and there you can get brochures about the cemetary and some suggestions of 4 intesting walks.

    Take it as a park and enjoy it!

    Ohlsdorf cemetary
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Historical Travel

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    Elbe Beach and Old Swede

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 27, 2009

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    The Elbe beach at Övelgönne (practise to pronounce the Umlaut;-))) is a popular meeting point among Hamburgers. Only some very tough people actually go swimming. However, the sand and pebble ground is perfect for putting up the barbecue and chilling out with friends.

    In case you spot an Australian flag on the beach, this is the local Australia Stammtisch having their monthly barbie meeting. Please say hi from me…

    Note the big rock on the beach. It is an erratic block, transported here by the glaciers of the ice age and recently unearthed during digging works in the shipping lane of the Elbe. Due to its presumably North-European origins it has become known as the “Old Swede”.

    Elbe beach at ��velg��nne Ship watching from the Elbe beach
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    • Beaches

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    Bugenhagenkirche

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 27, 2009

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    Hamburg’s ugliest church (I assume) was built in the 1920s in the suburb of Barmbek and named after the reformator Johannes Bugenhagen. The monumental building with its huge block-like steeple has a coating of bricks while the structure is made of concrete. It is an example of modern architecture in times of Bauhaus and expressionism. The ground floor, formerly the community hall, is now used for theatre and dance parties (!) while the church hall is on the first floor, to be reached up the outside staircase. The five sculptures above the portal depict important personalities from Hamburg’s church history.

    Bugenhagenkirche
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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    Levantehaus

    by nepalgoods Updated Feb 22, 2009

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    The meaning of the word Levante is: towards the sunrise. The house was build 1911/12 by Franz Bach as an office building for the Levante Shipping Company. During WWII the building was completely destroyed but 1948 to 1950 rebuildt. It shows the decorations of Art Deco. Very special!!!

    Today it houses about 40 shops, which offer high quality food and fashion. There are few restaurants and cafes. Everything is quite expensive here. But the atmosphere is spectacular.

    Levante Haus is not far from Main Trainstation, in the heart of Hamburg's shopping malls. The adress is Moenckebergstrasse

    There is also the Park Hyatt Hotel in this building, a very luxurious hotel

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Day Trips

    by chris.hh Written Jan 5, 2009

    Here are some websites to some places that are worth a visit if you have more time in Hamburg:

    Lüneburg is a cute city close to Hamburg with lots of framework houses, also a natural resort with heathland:
    Official website of the city: www.lueneburg.de
    Website of the whole area: www.lueneburger-heide.de

    The city of Lübeck is world cultural heritage and famous for its marzipan and x-mas market - so also a good tip for the December time;-)
    Marzipan, Thomas Mann, Kultur, Holstentor, Unesco-Weltkulturerbe – das sind die Begriffe, die vielen zuerst zu Lübeck einfallen. It almost 215.000 inhabitants. From here you also can go the the Eas Sea coast.
    Official website of the city: www.luebeck.de

    The "Altes Land" (>old land) is famous for the huge fruit plantages. The Elbe river is close and a tour with a bicycle is perfect, lots of farm that sell fruit and vegetable, lots of framework houses and some thatched roofs.
    www.tourismus-altesland.de

    Bremen is also possible in a one day trip - although Bremen has to offer more than that.
    www.bremen.de

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    The Wandse River

    by nepalgoods Written May 27, 2008

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    This small river is only 20km long but has at least 5 names: It starts with the name Wandse. This name derives of the old German word Wand, which means a border between two villages. The former village Wandsbek has its name from the river. Wandsbek is now a part of Hamburg and it is the place where I work. Later the Wandse changes to be the Rahlau, then the Eilbek and the Eilbek Channel and the Mundsburg Channel. The Wandse ends in the main Hamburgian river and lake: Alster.

    There is a lovely path to walk along the Wandse. It takes about one hour from Wandsbek to Alster. This part goes mainly through very urban landscape, but hat a lot of trees and places to have a rest. In the other direction the path along the Wandse brings you to the outskirts of Hamburg with some lovely villages and forrests near Volksdorf.

    Wandse River
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • chris.hh's Profile Photo

    Tired of the city?

    by chris.hh Written Oct 30, 2007

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    You do not need to leave the city if you are tired of the built environment. Why not have a break in the Stadtpark? It is pretty a large green area where people meet when sun is shining for some sports or just hanging around. Sometimes it also seems to be an open air disco... A big plus for this location: it is allowed to have BBQs here - so as soon as sun comes out in spring you'll find "Hamburgers" barbecueing...
    There are also many paths for a walk and you definately can find quiet places and enjoy cake and coffee in little cafes or have a beer in beergardens. Also have a look at the planetarium. They are supposed to have a great show but it is recommended to make ticket reservations. For more info: www.planetarium-hamburg.de.
    If you really need to cool down there is also an open air bath - however it's a natural lake - not everybody enjoys water plants grabbing the feet... Those who prefer to enjoy the sunset might do that in the beergarden next to the "pool".
    There is also a nice open air stage (Freilichtbühne Stadtpark). In summer there are many concerts of German artists as well as internationally known ones. It's also nice to sit down next to the place and enjoy music if you do not want to pay for a ticket - it also is a cool atmosphere...

    Opening of the Season in Spring Late Summer Atmosphere Colored Leaves in Autumn
    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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    Schanzenviertel (Schanzen quarter)

    by Rupanworld Written Oct 28, 2007

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    this is a quarter where you come across lots of Portuguese cafes and bars and mini restaurants with people sitting for long and chatting. My friend told me that this is a place in Hamburg where generally the young group of boys and girls hang out (and this is very close to Reeperbahn!!!). Can just check out the cafes here.

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    A bunker from WWII with lots of graffiti

    by Rupanworld Written Oct 28, 2007

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    When I went to Susannenstrasse and Schanzenviertel (Schanzen quarter), I came across this curious building and I was told by my friend that this is actually a bunker from the days of World War II. It is designed with a lot of graffiti and I really liked that. One can also test one's rock climbing skills here as the person in the first photo is doing. The environment was calm and I really liked whatever it was. Nice experience.

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Hamburg Off The Beaten Path

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