Bad Wimpfen Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Kathrin_E
  • Things to Do
    by Kathrin_E
  • Former ossuary
    Former ossuary
    by Kathrin_E

Most Recent Things to Do in Bad Wimpfen

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Historical Fountains

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 28, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Two large old fountains from the 16th century are preserved within the old town. Both have large stone basins where people fetched the water for their daily use.

    In the west there is the Adlerbrunnen (Eagle Fountain, photo 1) with a bronze eagle on top of the column. The eagle holding a key in his beak is the city's coat of arms.

    The meeting point of Hauptstraße, Marktrain and Neutorstraße forms a square which probably used to be the most important "traffic hub" of old Wimpfen - nevertheless it has no name of its own. Here the Löwenbrunnen (Lion Fountain, photos 2-5) with its large stone basin provided fresh water for the neighbourhood. The column bears a stone lion that holds the town's coat of arms in his paws. Bronze lionheads spit out the water.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Market Square

    by Kathrin_E Updated Nov 28, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The main square of Bad Wimpfen am Berg is located between the main church, the town hall and the Blue Tower. Unfortunately it is used as a parking lot and has a rather "off the beaten path" feel. There is the occasional restaurant but neither shop nor cafe - the daily life of the citizens happens elsewhere, down in Hauptstraße for example.

    The central building in market squarte is the town hall. The neoclassical building was erected in 1839; it substituted a 16th century half-timbered precedessor, of which a model can be seen in Reichsstädtisches Museum. The trees in the middle of the square surround a fountain which also looks rather 19th century to me.

    The opposite side is dominated by the protestant parish church (Stadtkirche, see separate tip).

    The small street around the church passes the so-called Wormser Hof (photo 5), once the seat of the representant of the Bishop of Worms. Its origins date back to the 13th century, with later changes and additions. The large barn building next to it served for the collection of natural taxes (tithe).

    The lower part of the square is surrounded by some pretty half-timbered townhouses, including one medieval house, the Barbarossa Inn (see separate tip).

    Town hall and Blue Tower Town hall and Stadtkirche Wormser Hof (right) and tithe barn (left)
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Calvary Scene by the Stadtkirche

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 28, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The churchyard around the protestant church was used as cemetery until the 16th century. Old tombstones along the church wall still recall the burial site. The small building in the southwestern corner served as ossuary.

    By its side we see a huge structure the size of a house with two open sides. It covers a life-size calvary with the three crosses. Despite heavy damage the beauty and quality of the artwork can still be appreciated. The sculptor was Hans Backoffen from Frankfurt, a famous artist in his time who has also created important works for example in the cathedral on Frankfurt. He created the crucifixion scene around 1515 for the tomb of a Wimpfen mayor. The renaissance pillar of the surrounding building bears the date 1551.
    Tour guides like to point out that, while all other personages are in antique dress, the Bad Thief wears the clothing of a contemporary lansquenet.

    Apologies for the blurred photos – a) there is a net in front of the sculptures to keep the birds out, b) it was raining quite hard so keeping the camera lens free of drops was impossible.

    The Bad Thief Former ossuary
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Stadtkirche

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 28, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The main church in the old town, simply known as Stadtkirche, is now in the hands of the protestant parish community. Its two spires and the huge roof are dominant landmarks in the skyline.

    The church is located next to market square but on an elevated terrace. From the square you look onto the elegant gothic chancel flanked by the two steeples.

    The church has regular opening hours in the summer months. In winter it is closed except during Sunday service. The entrance in the west is open, though, so you can at least peep into the church through the inner glass doors. The medieval art works, of which there must be a notable amount, can hardly be seen from there.

    A peep inside Churchyard with ossuary and crucification scene
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Reichsstädtisches Museum

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Museum of the Imperial City in the complex of the Heilig-Geist-Spital is dedicated to the history of Wimpfen. The exhibitions include all eras of its history until the 19th and early 20th century, and various topics like crafts, economy and trade, the development of the buildings, the Jewish population, military, artworks by local painters,

    Some historical interiors are visible, for example the Green Hall (photo 2) which the order used for representative venues, the mayor’s office from the Hassian time in the 19th century (photo 5), a furnitured hospital room from the 16th century. There is also a bit of explanation about timberframe construction in general and about research methods. Not all rooms are finished, they seem to be working on the permanent exhibition and there will probably be additional new exhibits sooner or later.

    What impressed me most, though, is the building itself. Inside you can see the timberframe structures and the sequel of the rooms. Note, for example, the „enfilade“ with arched doorways in the back wing (photo 3).

    Opening hours: Tuesday – Sunday 10.00-12.00 and 14.00-17.00. The museum is open all year round (unlike all the other museums in town which are closed during the winter months). Since my visit occurred in November I appreciated that…
    Entrance fee: 2.50 € for adults. Photography is permitted, they are even very relaxed about the use of flash. The cash desk is at the same time the town’s tourist office.

    Model of Wimpfen am Berg in the 18th century Green Hall Mayor's office, 19th century
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Heilig-Geist-Spital, now Museum: Buildings

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The former hospital building now contains the Reichsstädtisches Museum (Museum of the Imperial City, see separate Tipp). The complex consists of originally three separate buildings: the medieval stone house from the 13th century, the main half-timbered house and the attached back wing. The buildings are best viewed from the courtyard side off Langgasse. The backward wing with the blueish timberwork is a fine example of Alemannic timberframe construction.

    The hospital was founded in the first half of the 13th century and run by the order of the Holy Spirit. Part of it was originally a church. In the run of the centuries the building underwent various changes and, after the secularization of 1803, also new functions.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Medieval house in Market Square

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This house, the Barbarossa Inn, dates from the second half of the 13th century and is one of the oldest preserved half-timbered houses in Baden-Württemberg. The timberframe construction shows “alemannic” features. In the gable, the central beams form a characteristic but rare figure, the alemannic “Weible” (woman) – imagine a long skirt and uplifted arms.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Klostergasse

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This street deserves a separate tip because there are some special buildings in it and the ensemble has some interesting features. Klostergasse leads from Langgasse, behind the hospital/Reichsstädtisches Museum, to the Dominican church on top of the next hill. It is rather steep, photographers will appreciate the setting of the houses on the slope and the changing perspectives.

    Photo 1: Half-timbered houses in Klostergasse representing the different principles of construction – compare the Franconian style on the left and the Alemannic style on the right.

    Photo 2 and 3: The building on the left served as bathhouse in the middle ages. The natural spring underneath it still pours its water into the fountain underneath the stairway. The date 1534 is misleading, the bathhouse was mentioned already in the 14th century.

    Photo 4: This crooked house used to be the townhouse of the noble family von Ehrenberg. It is dated 1451 (inscription on the corner).

    Photo 5: Another old half-timbered house at the lower end of the street.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Dominikanerkirche

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The former abbey church of the Dominican convent is now the Roman-Catholic parish church of the old town. Its outlines are the typical ones of gothic mendicant churches, a long chancel for the monks and a nave for the lay community. The small bell tower on top of the nave with its curved top is a baroque addition.

    The interior has been refurbished step by step in the baroque era. In the early 18th century the nave was heightened and baroque vaults were installed. The main altar and the three side altars, the pulpit, the organ and the choir stalls are also works of the 18th century.

    Some medieval pieces are still inside the church: two tombstones for members of nobility with sculpted portraits of the defunct, some sculptures, an the painted coats of arms on the wall by the pulpit. The main altar contains a relic of the Holy Cross, which makes the church a popular destination for regional pilgrimages.

    Official opening hours are from March to October but the church seems to be open in the daytime all year (that is, it was open when I visited and catholic churches are usually open for prayer).

    The former convent buildings around the cloister are now occupied by a high school and not accessible. Several modern buildings have been added in the 20th century to accommodate the needs of the school (photo 5).

    Church and school on the hill
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Birkensee

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Calling this duck pond, pardon swan pond, a „lake“ is sort of exaggerated. Anyway, it has a pretty setting outside the town wall in what used to be the moat. The pond is surrounded by a small park. There is a cafe by the lake; the outdoor terrace should be a pleasant place to sit in summer.

    The long building on the other side of the main road (photo 5) used to be the old wine press. Nowadays it contains a restaurant.

    Old wine press building
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    View (*ahem*) of the Valley

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bad Wimpfen am Berg is located at the top of a steep slope, almost a cliff, above the outside bank of a wide river bend. From the footpath at the top of the cliff, along the wall of the Kaiserpfalz, you have (in theory) a fine view over the Neckar valley. In a November drizzle it was less impressive than it will be in sunny conditions, though. If you can, pick better weather to visit Bad Wimpfen…

    If you feel like walking, the path will take you down to the Neckar bridge from where you have the iconic view of Bad Wimpfen's skyline on the cliff, and further to Bad Wimpfen im Tal.

    Bridge and Bad Wimpfen im Tal Sugar factory The path outside the Pfalz walls
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Judenhaus – Former Jewish Prayer House

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The house in Schwibbogengasse 5 next to the steep stairway and opposite the gate tower is known as Judenhaus, jews’ house. It used to be the Jewish prayer house. An inscription in Hebrew and the date 1580 are still visible on the corner.

    Attached to the wall there is a memorial plate which lists the names of Jewish families from Wimpfen who perished in the Holocaust.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Steinhaus - Stone House

    by Kathrin_E Updated Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Steinhaus (stone house) is the only building of the Pfalz apart from the chapel that is completely preserved. The Romanesque house dates from around 1200, the stepped gable is an addition of the late middle ages. The building probably served as accommodation for the Empress and her court. The building now hosts the historical museum, which is unfortunately closed in winter. It should be worth visiting both for the exhibition and to see the interior of the building.

    The modern limestone pillar in front of the building recalls the important dates and events connected with the members of the Staufer dynasty and their stays in Wimpfen.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Roter Turm and Nürnberger Türmchen

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The “Red Tower” used to guard the eastern end of the medieval Kaiserpfalz. Its roof and top were destroyed in the 30 Year War. It is still 23 metres high. The outside walls show three different types of masonry made from different stones, hence three phases of construction.

    The Red Tower can be visited and climbed as part of guided tours in the city during the summer half of the year. Enquire with the tourist information office in Hauptstraße.

    A high town wall protects this eastward side of the Pfalz area. The hill then has a steep slope down to the streets of the town. A small tower is sitting on the corner of the wall, overlooking the lower quarters behind and the access to the town. It is named Nürnberger Türmchen, the “Nuremberg” Tower, because the wealthy city of Nuremberg donated funds for the rebuilding of their fellow imperial city of Wimpfen after the 30 Year War.

    N��rnberger T��rmchen N��rnberger T��rmchen
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Blauer Turm

    by Kathrin_E Written Nov 25, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The “Blue Tower” received its name from the blueish slate tiles on its historical roof. It was part of the medieval fortifications of the Kaiserpfalz.

    The present upper part with the high roof and the four little towers on the corners is a work of 19th century historism, though. It was built in 1848 after a fire had badly damaged the former roof.

    Trouble is, though, that this upper part is too heavy for the walls below and the pressure causes damage. That explains the ugly constructions with wooden beams and steel joists tied around the tower. They are to hold the walls together under the weight.

    On the top floor of the tower there is an apartment for a watchman, which is permanently inhabited. Currently there is a watchwoman living up there, to be precise. You climb up, pay the small entrance fee to the tower woman, and then you can enjoy the view from the open gallery around the top of the tower. Since the weather was lousy during my visit and the view would have been very limited, I saved myself the 167 stairs and did not climb the tower.

    The tower is open for visitors all year round, daily from 10.00 to 18.00. In winter, unfavourable weather conditions like ice or storm can enforce closings.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bad Wimpfen

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

37 travelers online now

Comments

Bad Wimpfen Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Bad Wimpfen things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bad Wimpfen sightseeing.

View all Bad Wimpfen hotels