Baden-Baden Things to Do

  • The Rose Trellis in the Gönneranlage
    The Rose Trellis in the Gönneranlage
    by Hikerpark
  • Brenner's Parkhotel
    Brenner's Parkhotel
    by Kathrin_E
  • Kurhaus
    Kurhaus
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Best Rated Things to Do in Baden-Baden

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    Trinkhalle: Water tasting!

    by Kathrin_E Updated Aug 25, 2008

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    Unfortunately there is no category "water tasting" among the themes...

    The Trinkhalle (drinking hall) hosts the tourist information office and one of Baden-Baden's thermal springs, the Friedrichsquelle. Hot spring water is constantly running from the tap and may be taken for free. Bring a bottle or a cup, or get a plastic cup for 20 cents there.

    It is recommended not to drink more than 400 ml of this water per day. Well, I assume you won't want more. The taste is strange, rather salty. Give it a try, though - this is one of the things one simply HAS to do when in Baden-Baden...

    The 19th century hall was built as a shady refuge where people could walk up and down, talk, watch and be watched while sipping their water.
    The paintings on the walls show scenes from old regional legends and fairy tales.

    The relief in the gable above the main entrance (photo 5) shows the healing powers of Baden-Baden's springs. From left to right, sick and old people are brought to the spring, which is impersonated by the nymph in the centre who is giving water to a little child and his mother. On the right side, healthy and happy young people are dancing and playing with their children.

    Trinkhalle: the loggia Trinkhalle in the Kurpark Trinkhalle in the Kurpark Detail of the frescoes Relief above the entrance
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  • Friedrichsbad

    by medolai Written Oct 21, 2006

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    Friedrichsbad is a spa with 13 stages. We read about this place before. My wife and I were a little hesitant of going inside because of nudity and mixed bathing, but decided to give it a try. After rounds of hot air bath and damp bath, we met at one of the warm mineral bath, both stark naked. It didn't feel awkward, partly because everyone was naked, and no one seemed to care about your presence. Most of bathers were couples, and in their 30's and 40's. It was very quiet, serene and peaceful. We were lying together in one of the jacuzzi pool, and felt like in heaven. All those stresses and aches seemed to vanish as were lying in warm water. There were one or two male bathers, who seemed to be interested in eyeing on ladies, but thery realized the general mood inside and left quickly. You could read about this place on their website or postings by others on Tripadvisor.

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    Drink Healing water in the Trinkhalle

    by Ujamaflip Written Oct 3, 2004

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    The old Trinkhalle building stands by the Casino. The building construction began in 1839, by Freidrich Huebsch, and was completed in 1942. The building was built as a place to drink mineral cures, and even today healing water from the Fredrichsquelle and Nuremberg are served to visitors.

    Additionally the building now houses a tourist information room, a ticket agency, a cafe, and a souvenir shop. The building is surrounded by pleasant gardens, and has a bust of Keiser Wilhelm 1st standing in front.

    Open daily from 10am until 6:30pm

    Trinkhalle
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    • Casino and Gambling
    • Historical Travel
    • Spa and Resort

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    Friedrichsbad

    by Kathrin_E Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    One of the two big public spas in town, situated in a beautiful 19th century building. Following the example of the ancient Romans, the bath has a fixed curriculum which takes about 2-3 hours.

    No need to bring towels and stuff, everything is provided.

    Friedrichsbad is entirely nude. Sexes are separated except in the big pool at the end.
    If you mind, better go to Caracallatherme instead.

    Friedrichsbad Friedrichsbad (the green copper roofs) from palace
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    Enjoy concerts at the Festspielhaus

    by Ujamaflip Updated Dec 30, 2008

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    The Festspielhaus first opened its doors in April 1998. With 2500 seats it is the second largest opera house and concert hall in Europe. The Festspielhaus is the only privately funded opera house in Europe.

    The bulding was constructed around the historical train station, and the two architectural styles where combined under the leadership of Viennese architect Wilhelm Holzbauer. The acoustics of the Festspielhaus are considered to be among the best in the world.

    I was fortunate enough to attend a concert of Bach's Matthias Passion, and it truly was a magnificent excperience. This was only one of 80 classical concerts presented per year, in addition to the operas, ballets and other concerts.

    The Festspielhaus also houses the Restaurant Aida. Tours of the house are available on certain days throughout the year, the duration is around 60 minutes, and the cost 5Eur.

    Festspielhaus - Baden-Baden Mariinsky Ballet - Don Quixote
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    • Music

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    A walk in the old town

    by Kathrin_E Updated Mar 29, 2008

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    The old town centre on the slopes of the hill has narrow streets, shops, restaurants and cafes (most of which can't be called cheap).
    The average age of the population in Baden-Baden is the highest in the whole of Germany, which one can't fail to notice when walking the streets.
    On top of the hill you'll find the palace (Neues Schloss). The building remained property of the Marggraves of Baden even after 1918, but they sold it in the 1990s to some investor who had planned to turn it into a luxury hotel. So far, nothing has happened since...

    See my travelogue page for more pictures of the romantic old town.

    In the old town Bismarck  monument
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    Caracalla Therme Spa

    by josie123 Written Dec 31, 2006

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    You should definitely visit the modern Caracalla spa (Friedrichsbad is the older, rougher around the edges and also more expensive bath house) when in Baden-Baden or the local area. Entry can be purchased for 2/3 or 4 hours for 12/14/16 Euro accordingly, I'd advise to pick 4 hours for the extra 4 euro as time flies once you're inside.

    Once you have spent an hour or so relaxing in the pool and loungers make your way upstairs to the 'Roman sauna scape'. Be warned though this area is completely nude as a multilingual sign warns you on the door and you discover quite abruptly upon entering.

    My boyfriend and I where quite shocked at first being of a classically prudish English nature but 'when in Rome' as they say. After completly removing your swimwear and inhibitions you are free to enjoy a wonderful series of connected saunas, steam rooms, plunge pools, hot tubs and relaxation areas at your leisure. Especially recommended are the outdoor Swedish and Norwegian log cabin saunas (and ice cold outdoor showers between the two) along with the blue space room where you lie on plastic pods in a dimmed blue aura and feel ambient music vibrate inside the bed and through your bod.

    For those who may also feel a little prudish I can say after our initial nerves we found the atmosphere upstairs to be very respectful and relaxed as well as obviously highly liberating and invigerating. The unwritten rule seems to be very much a stare into middle distance with the odd curious glance down or across permitted, definitely no staring and remember boys it's rude to point! We visited on a weekday afternoon and the majority of visitors were middle aged men and women both single and in couples but it was also refreshing to find younger French and German couples and singles in their early twenties, like us, enjoying the sauna without any qualms.

    outdoor pool steam room

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    Try your luck in the Casino

    by Ujamaflip Written Oct 3, 2004

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    Baden-Baden Casino is situated in the Kurhaus. The Kurhaus was converted from a Promenade House into a "Conversation House" between 1821 and 1824 by Freidrich Weinbrenner. Upon completion, a license was issued for a Casino to be operated on the premises, and it now makes up the right wing of the building.

    The casino is the largest and oldest in Germany, and one of the most renouned and magnificent in the world.

    Minimum bets are 5Eur, maximum 10,000Eur, but if you prefer to keep your money in your pocket you can always take a guided tour. Tours of the Casino are available daily from 9:30am until 11:30 between April and September, and from 10:00am until 11:30 between October and March. Prior arrangement should be made for tours in English, French and Russian.

    Baden-Baden Casino
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    Lichtenthal Abbey

    by Kathrin_E Written May 16, 2008

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    Lichtenthal Abbey is a Cistercian monastery which was founded by Irmengard von Baden, the widow of Marggrave Hermann V., in 1245 and has uninterruptedly been inhabitated by nuns ever since to this very day.
    Those who are familiar with German history may note this fact with astonishment. No, the monastery was not affected by the secularization of 1803/1806 because the nuns were and are still running a school, which was considered a useful activity for society, and because they guard the graves of many members of the house of Baden in the princes' chapel.

    Since the monastery is still active all visitors can enter on their own is the forecourt, the book and art shop and the church.
    Three times a week (Wed, Sat, Sun 3 p.m.) guided tours take visitors into the Fürstenkapelle (princes' chapel) where the graves are and into the little museum.

    Abbey seen from Lichtentaler Stra��e F��rstenkapelle Door to the cloister buildings Fountain in the courtyard
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    • Religious Travel
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    Ruins of the Roman Baths

    by Kathrin_E Updated Aug 20, 2010

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    The ancient Romans have already enjoyed the thermal springs of Aquae, the settlement that later became Baden-Baden. Excavations have unearthed the remnants of the Roman spa. The ruins can be seen underneath the Friedrichsbad at the entrance to the parking garage.

    Opening hours: March 16 to Nov 15, 11.00-12.00 and 15.00-16.00 (Nov 16 to March 15 closed). Opening hours have been reduced to one hour in the morning and one hour in the afternoon in 2010!
    Entrance fee: adults € 2.50, kids (14 and under) € 1.00. The entrance fee includes an audioguide which is helpful to understand what you see, there are no written explanations in the excavations. The audioguide is available in several languages.

    Strictly no photography inside (*whispers* but when the thing is closed no one can keep you from taking photos through the window)

    Ruins of the Roman spa Replicas of Roman items are on sale in the shop Roman inscriptions
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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • Friedrichsbad

    by eesee Updated Feb 1, 2005

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    A great experience! Here are some details...

    There are 16 steps involved: 1) Shower, 2) Warm Air Bath - 54C, 3) Hot Air Bath - 68C, 4) Shower, 5) Soap Scrub and Massage, 6) Shower, 7) Steam Bath - 45C, 8) Steam Bath - 48C, 9) Thermal Bath - 36C, 10) Wirlpool Bath - 34C, 11) Cool Pool - 28C, 12) Shower, 13) Cold Plung Pool, 14) Shower, 15) Moisturing, 16) Relaxation.

    The Soap Scrub and Massage are optional - miss them out if you want to keep your sun tan!

    On Mondays and Thursdays, men and women are kept separate for all but the Wirlpool and the Cool Pool. On other days, you can be together for the Steam Baths onwards. On these days it seems to be the case that the women find the men in the "men's" Steam Baths. If the women don't want to mix with the men then they can stay in their own Steam Baths - the men don't seem to venture in there.

    Apparently there seems to be a bit of a queue on the women's side for the Soap Scrub. There is some sort of 'take a number' scheme but it is still a bit disorganised. No such queue on the men's side.

    Don't believe the pictures of the Friedrichsbad - you don't get to keep hold of your towel after the second shower. You are naked from then on. But don't worry about all the mixed nudity - it's a very benign environment.

    Most of the people there (on a mixed day) seemed to be couples, mainly in their thirties. Though there was still a wide mix of other age ranges.

    Verdict (of both me and semi shy girlfriend): Yes - do it, and we'll be back to do it again.

    The Cool Pool
    Related to:
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    Neues Schloss - New Palace

    by Kathrin_E Updated Aug 20, 2010

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    The former residence of the Marggraves of Baden-Baden on the Florentinerberg was first built in the 16th century and later extended. In 1700 Marggrave Ludwig Wilhelm decided to move to Rastatt where he had his new baroque palace and town erected. The palace in Baden-Baden served only for occasional visits from then on.

    In 1995 the Marggraves of Baden sold the palace and all its interior in an auction. An investor bought the building and planned to turn it into a luxury hotel. So far, nothing has happened, probably due to financial problems. The decay of the building continues, its further fate is yet to decide about.

    The terrace (photo 2) offers a nice view of the town and the valley.
    The palace itself is closed to visitors. If the main gate is open, at least a (forbidden) peep into the courtyard is possible (photo 5).

    Update, summer 2010: Seems a new investor has been found and new plans have been made. A recent press release announced the the works to start soon. "With utmost care" (whatever that is supposed to mean) the palace will be turned into a luxury hotel. A new building is planned in the park. The hotel is to open in 2013. The picture (photo 5) is taken from the sign they have put up outside the palace.

    Neues Schloss seen from Marktplatz The terrace Neues Schloss and Heilig Grab monastery View through the gate into the courtyard Project for new hotel building in the park, 2010
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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    World Famous Casino

    by nhcram Written Aug 31, 2008

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    The world famous casino is in the centre of the town and visitors can walk in and admire the wonderful building. The casino is housed in the Kurhaus which, was built built between 1821 and 1824. If you can afford to spend the evening here I am sure you will spot some famous people and kiss goodbye to many Euros! "The most beautiful casino in the world”, was how Marlene Dietrich described Germany’s oldest casino. Formal dress is required to gamble or eat there but you can take a guided tour wearing what you like and you don't have to part with much money to do that.

    The staircase in the casino

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    Romische Badruinen

    by nhcram Written Aug 31, 2008

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    Baden Baden has a long tradition as a spa town stretching back as far as the Roman tines. They built some of the first baths here and the evidence is now preserved for all to see. One of the baths lies beneath the Friedrichsbad and is known as the soldiers bath. Both the floor and wall heating systems are in an amazing state of oreservation.
    **Please note there is no photography inside**
    Audio guides can be provided and there is also a computer video animation if the original baths.
    Entance fee in May 2008 was 2.50 Euro

    Part of the small museum attached to the baths

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    Tinkhalle (Tourist Info Building)

    by nhcram Written Aug 31, 2008

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    The Trinhalle is now home to the tourist information office and is very close to the casino in the Kurpark. Built between 1839 and 1842, it is 300-feet-long and shows 14 frescoes depicting legends about Baden-Baden. There are also Corinthian pillars adornig the building.
    Inside the Trinkhalle you can sample the hot spring water for free If you haven't got a bottle or cup you can buy one very cheaply there.
    There is also a small cafe and ticket service in here too.

    Tinkhalle Frescoes Pillars and frescoes

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