Flehingen Travel Guide

  • Flehingen Castle
    Flehingen Castle
    by Russell_the_Wombat
  • Sickingen crest in the vault, 1523
    Sickingen crest in the vault, 1523
    by Kathrin_E
  • Flehingen, Protestant Church
    Flehingen, Protestant Church
    by Kathrin_E

Flehingen Things to Do

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo
    Choir with quadruple monumental tomb and altar 4 more images

    by Kathrin_E Updated Oct 17, 2010

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    The church of Sickingen is the oldest of the three churches in the double village. Its construction took place in the earliest era of the reformation. Rumours have it that this church was the first ever protestant church building but... there is a "but".
    Several Imperial Knights in the Kraichgau region were among the followers of Luther and among the first territorial rulers who introduced the Protestant lore in their villages and churches. The construction of the church dates from 1523 (date in the vault of the choir). One member of the Sickingen family, the (in)famous Franz von Sickingen, is known as an ardent supporter of the reformation. However, the village of Sickingen did not belong to him but to his uncle Konrad who wisely stayed away from his relative's military adventures. Thus, although Franz had Lutheran church services celebrated in his realm already in 1522, the church of Sickingen must be considered a catholic church. However, the village turned protestant soon after.

    Details are not known, there is a lot of confusion about the history of Sickingen, both the family and the village. Even genealogy is not clear, every researcher published a different version of the family tree. The archive is lost so this will remain unknown. Next-door Flehingen got its first Lutheran preacher in 1530.

    The church in Sickingen stayed Lutheran-protestant until the early 17th century - again, the excact date is unknown resp. the dates given are contradictory - when the Sickingen family converted to the Roman Catholic confession. Since then the church has been Catholic.

    As usual at residences of noble families, the church contains their tombs. The Sickingen tombs in the choir, however, are elaborate art works high above the usual level. These are the church's greatest treasures with their exquisite stone carved figures. The defunct are presented almost life-size, the men dressed in armour, the women in festive clothing according to the Spanish court fashion. To be noted:
    - tomb of Lucia von Andlau, died 1547 (photo 4), wife of Franz Konrad von Sickingen
    - tomb of Hans von Sickingen, elder brother of Franz Konrad, died 1547
    - the 7 metres high quadruple monument of Franz the Younger von Sickingen and his wife Anna Maria von Venningen and, above, their son Schweickard with his wife Maria Magdalena von Kronberg, created around 1610 (photo 2)

    Contact the parish if you want to visit the church, it is not always open.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo
    What used to be the village of Sickingen 3 more images

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 16, 2010

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    Sickingen used to be a village of its own with a castle of its own, home to the noble family von Sickingen. The family had to sell their property in the 19th century and finally died out. The castle, later a water palace, fell in ruins and was finally demolished. There is nothing left of Sickingen Palace. It was located in the valley by the creek where the modern festival hall has been built. Only the village church remained (see separate tip).

    In 1936 Sickingen lost its independence and was united with neighbouring Flehingen. Worse than that, Sickingen even lost its name and became part of Flehingen. Painful for the Sickinger inhabitants because these two villages have always been rivals. It's only small comfort that in the meantime the same has also happened to Flehingen in the 1970s when the united village became part of Oberderdingen.

    The memory is kept alive. Information boards, actually in German and English, have been placed by the stair to the church. The inhabitants are proud of the history of their village and its knightly family. The Knights of Sickingen had the status of imperial knights and then barons and ruled a territory with property not only here but also West of the Rhine around the Nahe valley and in the Palatinate Hills. They were related to the neighbours von Flehingen and used the same crest. The most famous representant of the family was Franz von Sickingen, imperial office, robber-knight and supporter of the reformation, a colourful figure who died a dramatic death in 1523 after his campaign against the mighty Archbishop of Trier failed.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Former imperial post office

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 16, 2010

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    Along the street that leads to the train station, a post office was installed around 1900. The building has long ceased to be a post office, it is a residential house. However, the facade still bears the (renewed) crest of the German Empire and the inscription "Kaiserliches Postamt" (Imperial Post Office). A few years later the Catholic parish community built their kindergarten, new church and parsonage next to it.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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