Haslach im Kinzigtal Things to Do

  • Passageway through the steeple
    Passageway through the steeple
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  • View from beyond the little river
    View from beyond the little river
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  • Romanesque tympanon
    Romanesque tympanon
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Most Recent Things to Do in Haslach im Kinzigtal

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    Catholic Church of St Arbogast

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    The somehow misshaped proportions of the church indicate a complicated history. The smaller steeple in the west is the oldest part, dated 1481.

    The former main nave, which now serves as entrance hall to the newer eastern part, substituted its probably medieval precedessor in the 1780s.

    In the early 20th century the church was extended to the east. The 18th century choir remained but was redesigned. New additions, built in 1906/07, include the transepts and the enormous eastern steeple which dominates Haslach's skyline. The neobaroque style with some art nouveau elements is typical for catholic church architecture just before World War I.

    I could not see the interior, due to the festival and the presence of countless drunk jesters the church was locked. The interior has some late baroque frescoes, altars etc. date from the extension period after 1900. The oldest piece inside is the 15th century tomb of Count Götz von Fürstenberg and his wife Anna von Montfort.

    Also note the old parsonage, an impressive half-timbered house with high gable and roof.

    Church seen from sountheast Choir and eastern steeple 18th century nave and medieval western steeple Nave and southern transept Old Parsonage
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    Heinrich Hansjakob Monument

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 29, 2010

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    Heinrich Hansjakob (1837 - 1916) is a famous personality in Baden: parson, author and politician. He was born in Haslach on August 17, 1837, as the son of a baker and innkeeper. He studied theology in Freiburg. He first worked as a teacher but was dismissed because of his political activities. Politics and hot temper earned him a couple of weeks in prison twice.
    From 1869 to 1883 he was the parson of Hagnau/Bodensee where he gained fame among wine lovers: he founded the vintners association and renewed the almost ruined viticulture on the shores of the lake. During that time he was also a deputee in the parliament of Baden. In 1884 he moved to Freiburg and became parson at the church of St Martin, which he stayed until 1913 despite several illnesses. He officially retired only at the age of 75. In 1916 he died in his hometown Haslach. He is buried in a chapel in the nearby village of Hofstetten.
    Hansjakob wrote, apart from scientific and political works, narratives and novels that tell about the history of the Black Forest, mentality and way of life of its natives.

    Monument to Heinrich Hansjakob
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    Capuchin Monastery and Costume Museum

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 29, 2010

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    The former Capuchin monastery was founded outside the town in the middle of the 30 Years War and erected in 1630-32. The buildings have survived in their original shape, including cloister, convent buildings and church, which makes this about the only originally preserved architecture of the Capuchin order in Southern Germany.

    The former abbey church, now the catholic parish church of St Christophorus, contains some graves of the Counts of Fürstenberg. Due to the requirements of the Capuchin order the architecture is rather plain.
    Next to the church a smaller pilgrimage church, the Loreto Chapel, was built 30 years later. The chapel was donated by Count Maximilian Franz von Fürstenberg.

    The monastery was closed down in the secularization of the early 19th century. The three wings of the convent buildings around the cloister now host the Schwarzwälder Trachtenmuseum which presents traditional costumes from all parts of the Black Forest. Due to limited opening hours in winter and the festival in town I did not have the chance to see it.

    Capuchin monastery Entrance to the museum Capuchin monastery Loreto chapel and abbey church
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    Pigs and Storks

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 29, 2010

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    Some funny metal animals can be spotted in Haslach...

    The pig family and their human company are located in the middle of Hauptstraße. Some bronze humans keep permanent watch of them, real people of flesh and blood often join them.

    The storks' nest (photo 2) is attached to a house at the beginning of Pharrgasse, opposite the choir of the church. The birds enjoy eternal sunshine, no matter what the weather is like. No wonder - the house behind them is a tanning studio.

    Pig family Storks family in the sun
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    St Sebastian Fountain

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    The baroque fountain in market square was erected in 1731.The column carries a statue of St Sebastian, the patron saint of the town. According to the legend Sebastian was an ancient Roman soldier and secret follower of the Christian faith. The statue depicts his martyrdom: tied to a tree trunk, he was shot with arrows.

    Footnote: The witch is not part of the fountain, she only comes to visit on very rare occasions...

    St Sebastian statue (and witch) Fountain with St Sebastian statue and witch
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    Rathaus - Town Hall

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 29, 2010

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    The vaulted hall on the ground floor is a remain of the 1572 town hall building which bwas destroyed in the fire of 1704. The rest was rebuilt in 1733 and renovated in 1953.

    The murals depict local people in traditional dress and figures from local legends. I am inclined to attribute these paintings to the 1950s renovation.

    The relief of the Fürstenberg crest, also dated 1572, originates from a gate tower and has been transferred to the town hall after the tower's demolition in 1831.

    Town hall Town hall
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    Kasten - 16th Century Grain Store

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 29, 2010

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    The so-called "Kasten" is one of the very few buildings in Haslach that survived the fire of 1704, probably thanks to its solid stone walls and its location next to the steeple of the parish church. It was built around 1550 and belonged to the Counts of Fürstenberg who ruled this part of the Kinzig valley. The building served as storage for the grain taxes. There used to be a second, similar store which was demolished in 1906.

    The late gothic stone portal is not an original part of the store. It belonged to a private house in town and has been transferred here in recent times.

    Kasten Kasten and steeple Kasten
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    Haslach's Oldest Artwork: Romanesque Tympanon

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 29, 2010

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    Haslach's history actually begins in the time of the ancient Romans but there is nothing visible left. The oldest piece that you can visit and see in the streets is the Romanesque tympanon of the medieval church, the pre-pre-precedessor of the present one. This piece is dated to the 12th century. It shows the fall of mankind in paradise, Adam and Eve on the left, the tree in the middle and Godfather on the right. The stone relief is weathered so you need some imagination to recognize the picture.

    The relief is now put up in the passageway underneath the old steeple, protected from weather.

    Romanesque tympanon Passageway through the steeple Steeple with passageway
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    The Old Town

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 26, 2010

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    Haslach is one of many small towns in the Black Forest that have preserved a small but pretty old town. Recently people who used to despise the "old stuff" have rediscovered its value. Many old houses have been restored. The timberwork of the facades was uncovered from plaster and coatings and shows its ornamental structures. The old town is not as big and not as spectacular as nearby Gengenbach, but if you are travelling the Kinzig valley it is worth a stop.

    Old Haslach was burnt to ashes in 1704 during a war that actually was about the throne of Spain but severely affected the Southwest of Germany. Most buildings in town are 18th century and younger. The few exceptions are described in separate tips.

    View from beyond the little river
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