Heidelberg Off The Beaten Path

  • Tiefburg Castle
    Tiefburg Castle
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    The Old Bridge
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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Heidelberg

  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Travel pharmacy cases

    by Trekki Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    Travel pharmacy case of 17th century

    In the rooms where all the Offizins are exhibited, you’ll see what the people used these days when travelling. Tiny instruments and equipment is on display in showcases, the most beautiful exhibit is an old travel pharmacy case of 17th century, which belonged to a commander. It contained everything, from tiny glass and silver vessels with the medicines to small instruments.

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    Pharmacy Museum – Officinas

    by Trekki Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    Offizin of Benedictine monastery (1724)
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    In the German Pharmacy Museum, you will come across 4 offizins, the old pharmacy shops. They nicely show the development over the years, from the first shops in buildings (rather than on old markets).

    The table(s) in the middle of the room(s) did not serve as counter, as usually, the customers did not enter the pharmacists’ shops, but were given the medication through a little window. The tables have been used to mix the medicines’ ingredients.

    You’ll come across beautiful pharmacy furniture, the famous drawers being still imitated today.

    Pic 1: baroque interior of Benedictine monastery in Schwarzach (1724). 2 statues – Aesculap (god of healing) and Hygieia (his daughter) are standing on the preparation table, in their hands the symbol of medicine – snake and staff. The balance is of 1830 (France), having a porcelain pedestal. The mixing table has 60 drawers with ingredients; more ingredients are in the shelf, in beautiful glass vessels.

    Pic 2: cherry wood closet and drawer, 1812, of Kronen Apotheke (Ulm, Germany).

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    Pharmacy history - from early beginnings

    by Trekki Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    Industrialisation of Pharmacies

    Upon entering the Pharmacy Museum, you will learn much about the early stages of pharmacy, from its first idea of legalization in 13th century to it’s industrialization over the years. All the important and trend-setting researchers of these days are mentioned and explained how they have contributed to modern pharmaceutical developments.

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  • lifeisatrip's Profile Photo

    Weinfest

    by lifeisatrip Updated Aug 22, 2008

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    In autumn, the local vineyards have their weinfest. There are two such places going up Gaiberg from Leimen - Weingut Clauer and Weingut Bauer.

    Going south on Rorhbacher straße, turn left at the light after the bahnstelle (straßenbahn station which is to your left , across is the Famila shopping center). Go up the hill and you'll see the sign for the first vineyard, Weingut Clauer. A few hundred yards more and the sign for Weingut Bauer will be visible. Both are on the left side of the road.

    This year's Weingut Clauer's weinfest is on 13-14 September 2008.

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    Bergfriedhof

    by christine.j Updated Jul 31, 2008

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    Bergfriedhof - mountain cemetery - a fitting name, this cemetery is laid out on a mountain and some paths are really steep.

    Probably the most famous grave there is that of Friedrich Ebert, who became the first German president after abolishing monarchy in 1919. He was born in Heidelberg in 1871 and died in 1925. Signs are leading towards his grave.

    There are also many old, large family graves from the formerly important families of Heidelberg, often with very interesting ornaments.

    To get there, take any S-Bahn or streetcar to the stop Weststadt/Südstadt and enter the cemetery through the side gate there. The main gate cannot be reached this year (2008), because there is construction work going on right outside.

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    Berger und Mathes

    by leics Updated Jun 13, 2008

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    I spotted this plaque in the side of a building as I wandered round the centre of Heidelberg. Its on a small road which runs parallel to the river towards the Old Bridge gate. It's quite small, and above head-height, so easily missed.

    I assume it is an indication of ownership (I'm not sure the building was originally a dwelling-place).

    I particularly like the bulls head coat of arms: very impressive!

    A nice bit of ordinary 17th century Heidelberg.

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  • A funny statue next to the old bridge

    by sabsi Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    The monkey

    Next to the old bridge at the old town end there's a funny statue of a monkey with a mirror. You can get your picture taken with a monkey face here. A funny idea I think! I still haven't found out what this is all about (and only now found out that the statue shows a monkey and not a cat) but I will let you know as soon as I find out...

    Wahey, now I know:
    starxtrouble Sat Jun 17, 2006 16:24 CEST
    "The monkey statue is said to represent a prince of heidleberg who had lots of illegitimate children. touch the monkeys outstrectched fingers you will return to heidleberg. touch the mice you will have many children. touch the mirror you will become rich."

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    A couple of nights in Heidelberg

    by azz8206 Updated May 15, 2008
    The castle ruins perched atop the Altstadt
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    A tiny hamlet on the river Neckar. Heidelberg is a university town and there is also an american airbase nearby. There are the ruins of a castle perched high above the old town where poet Johann von Goethe once walked in the courtyard and was maybe inspired by looking down on the old town. You can either walk up the mountainside to the courtyard or you can take a cable car up. There is also a very picturesque old bridge. My wife and I found it very romantic there and I would recommend going there for a short stay while in Germany.
    Also a piece of WW2 trivia for you. This is the city where General George S. Patton was killed in an accident while riding in his jeep.

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    Burying the knights

    by christine.j Updated Mar 17, 2008

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    This was the church the knights of Handschuhsheim went to service, and also the place where they are buried.Their crest - the glove - can be seen around the church on many tombstones.Inside there are also several large tombstones, one of them is the tombslab of knight Dietrich and his wife (picture 1). They are kneeling, in order to demonstrate their piousness.

    The second picture shows the last knight's family,it was erected at the burial of the last adult knight. He and his wife are shown as grown-ups - large -, while their two children are dressed as adults, but their small size indicates they were children.

    Picture 3 shows the tombstone of Hans von Handschuhsheim and his sister, the children in picture 2. The girl, Barabara, died when she was 13, and her brother was killed in a duel with his cousin shortly before his 16th birthday.His grieving mother cursed the cousin's family, predicting they'd also die out. The curse worked, when the cousin died, he left his second wife behind, but no children.
    It is interesting that the family history of the knights of Handschuhsheim refers to their fight as a "duel", while the family history of the knights of Hirschhorn calls it a "tournament". Since it took place at midnight on the market square of Heidelberg, I would consider a duel more likely. During a tournament there were spectators, and at midnight they wouldn't have seen very much.

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    St Vitus in Handschuhsheim

    by christine.j Written Mar 17, 2008

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    One of Heidelberg's oldest churches is the St.Vitus church in Handschuhsheim. It was first built in 11th century, from 1053 to 1057. Some of these old walls are still preserved, but most of what you see today is from a major renovation in early 15th century. From this period several frescoes have survived, showing the life of Jesus. When you enter the church, turn around and you can see them directly above the entrance and on the walls next to it.

    Towards the end of the 15th century the church had to repaired, since it had been damaged in the many battles fought by one of the knights of Handschuhsheim, Dietrich. He was a close friend of the Prince-Elector Frederic I of Heidelberg, something that didn't always work to the advantage of the people of Handschuhsheim. Frederic was nicknamed the "victorious", but in order to be victorious he had to fight many battles first, and much of Heidelberg and surroundings suffered.

    In 20th century St Vitus was renovated again, so that today the windows and the altar are modern.

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    Is your Brezel big enough??

    by christine.j Updated Dec 19, 2007

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    Very much ON the beaten path, but hidden by the vendors' stalls is the image of a brezel, engraved in the walls of the Heiliggeist Kirche on main street. When the market around the church was first started (I heard in 14th century, but I'm not sure here), people liked their brezels as much as today. To make more money, bakers made the brezels smaller and smaller, still asking the same price. To put an end to this, the correct size of a brezel was engraved in the church wall, so that everybody could go and check if his/her brezel was big enough.
    You can still see this brezel, best when the stalls are closed. Or take a peek in between them to see it.
    I was there early during the time of the Christmas Market and found the stalls directly opposite the Christmas Market not only closed, but gone. So for the first time I could get a really good view of the brezel.

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    Heidelberg's flair, remaining from the 70s...

    by JessH Updated May 15, 2007

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    One of my favourite streets in Heidelberg
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    Of course the main street through Heidelberg's old town is the city's main attraction and is crammed full with shops, restaurants, cafes and street vendors. But if you need a little break and are open for some alternative & unusual things, take a step aside and walk down to the Heumarkt / Untere Strasse.

    Here, there aren't any crowds. There is more shade & relief from the summer's heat and in winter you don't have to dodge so many people on slippery ice; it is quieter and there are some real hidden gems that you wouldn't find amongst the "tourist hot spots":

    WELL, now that you're here:
    > Enjoy some lunch or refreshments at a smaller, older and more personal cafe / deli.
    > Discover some of Heidelberg's "Hippie Shops" where you can find anything from Indian Incense, to Thai silk, African furniture, fantastic alternative music and so much more.
    > You'll also come across small bookstores and old, family-run confectionaries.
    > There is also a lady with a lovely shop selling healing crystals, spiritual books, etc. and she also offers personal life coaching sessions, meditations, etc. I really like her and always stop-by and say "hello" when I'm in town. (her shop is right next to the fountain statue, see picture)

    It's amazing how close this little gem of a street is to all of the hustle & bustle of the old town, yet the local residents aren't much disturbed by all of that craziness because hardly any of the "people traffic" ever filters down here. To me, these little streets are the "essence" of Heidelberg's spirit.

    --> How to get here?
    This is very close to the University Platz (between the Hauptstrasse and the Old Bridge / Neckar River) If you are walking on the Hauptstrasse towards the Kornmarket & Church, turn left when you see the shop "Belobene" & "Starbucks" (Now, listen to me: walk straight PAST Starbucks and have a coffee in one of the nearby family-owned cafes!)

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    Wolfsbrunnen - The Wolf's Fountain

    by christine.j Written Apr 11, 2007

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    Legends vary why this fountain is called the wolf's fountain. They all agree in the first part: About 2000 years ago, when the Romans ruled Heidelberg, there was a woman living up in the mountains all by herself. In some stories she is an old woman, in others she is young and beautiful, but in all she is called a wise woman who knew a lot about medicine, herbs and sometimes could tell the future. She once found a wolf's cub in the woods, took it home and raised it. This wolf stayed with her and was her companion.
    According to one legend, while she was getting some water from the fountain, a pack of wild wolves came and attacked her. Her tame wolf tried to defend her, but in vain, and she was killed.
    Another legend, however, tells the story like this: The Romans didn't trust her. The citizens of Heidelberg would go up to her and consult her, when they had problems, and the Romans were suspicious. One day, some Roman soldiers went up and killed her. Her tame wolf tried to help her, so they killed him as well. Afterwards, they made it look like the tame wolf had suddenly attacked her, because they feared the revenge of the people.
    Of course, after 2000 years, who knows what is true. The official version in Heidelberg is that the fountain is called wolf's fountain because the prince's game warden used to live here.
    However, even official Heidelberg honoured the legends by putting up the statue of wolf in the center of the water.
    Today, this is a very nice spot for a picnic after a hike. Or, if you want to have a full meal, there is a restaurant nearby, called Wolfsbrunnen.

    To get there you can drive to Heidelberg Schlierbach, Wolfsbrunnensteige.
    Or walk there from the castle: Walk through the castle garden and exit at the very end. Follow the road called Wolfsbunnensteige to the fountain.
    Or drive up the Königstuhl and hike down. It's a very nice hike! From the fountain you can walk to the castle and take the furnicular back up to the Königstuhl.

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    Fun for Children and their Parents

    by christine.j Written Apr 11, 2007

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    A playground with a giant's hands
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    Children, especially when they are still small, are not the least bit interested in the castle or the history of Heidelberg. But they would enjoy going up to the Königstuhl. This is a large area on top of the highest mountain of Heidelberg. You can do some hiking from there or you can visit the fairy tale park. There are several statues from the tales of the brothers Grimm, some rides for kids to enjoy, playgrounds, you can learn how an old mill worked etc. You can also try to shoot a ball up a wall with a water pistol, it's not as easy as it seems to be!

    Prices are 3 Euro for adults, 2 Euro for children, but for some attractions inside the park you have to pay extra.

    Their website is in German only, an indication that is really off the beaten path in a touristic city like Heidelberg.

    To get there you can take a bus from Bismarckplatz, Bus 39, or you can take the furnicular. This is the more interesting way to go up. The new furnicular will take you up from Heidelberg Bergbahn station past the castle to the Molkenkur stop. Here everybody has to get off and change to the old furnicular for the last part of the trip. The old train is smaller, so there can be some waiting time.
    Alternatively, you can also drive up there, just follow the signs "Königstuhl".There is a large parking lot.
    Or, if you're really into working out, you can of course hike up. But that's not recommended if you are travelling with small children.

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    Kaiserstuhl

    by Sjalen Updated Nov 22, 2006

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    Not really "off the beaten path" as lots of people come up here, but its location high up on the peak above the Castle (enlarge the photo to see the masts in the haze) means that it still filters some of the hoardes of tourists who do not want to pay for the expensive fare up here or just do not have time to venture outside the Castle and Old Town. Kaiserstuhl, the "Emperors' Seat", has more than good views of Heidelberg. Being up here, you can see in several directions and therefore a good chunk of Baden-Württemberg in good weather. You can also visit the falconry centre (see first link) with its displays, and for children there is a fairyland park (see second link) so there are things to do up here apart from hiking, which makes it a nice day out.

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Heidelberg Off The Beaten Path

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