Castle/Schloss, Heidelberg

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  • Castle/Schloss
    by GracesTrips
  • Castle/Schloss
    by Igraine
  • Castle/Schloss
    by Igraine
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    Christmas market at the castle

    by Igraine Updated Nov 26, 2014

    In 2013 we visited Heidelberg again. And the thing to do is visiting the castle. Last I time was here, it was during the VT meet in '08 in May. Now it was a chilly late November day. So cold that we bought ourselves a new hat on the station.

    To our big surprise when we arrived on the castle grounds, there was a christmas market on the grounds of the castle. It wasn't open yet so we did a tour of the castle, the big casket and the Apothecary museum first.
    When we got back it was time for lunch. And boy some lunch we had! Look at the pictures. Sorry for the blurry one of my bun with salmon but the taste was delicious! The white wine elderberry gluhwein was too!

    The other thing I bought was a cheesecake with mandarins from a stand that has a shop in Freiburg. That was delicious too, we ate that later in our hotelroom. Stefans Kaesekuchen

    Roasting the salmons My bun with hot salmon, and honey mustard sauce Entrance to the market
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    Visit the castle.

    by Maurizioago Updated Nov 3, 2014

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    The castle is a beautiful bunch of ruins located on a hill overlooking the old town and the Neckar river.

    Prince elector Ruprecht III (1398-1410) was the first to erect the first building as a royal residence. The prince electors of the 16th and 17th centuries turned the fortress into a castle. During the 30 Years War the castle and gardens were destroyed. Later they were rebuilt between 1649 and 1680. Then the French troops destroyed them again. After, prince elector Karl Theodor tried to restore the castle, but a lightning struck it in 1764.

    The castle houses the German Pharmaceutical Museum (Deutsche Apotekenmuseum) which has pharmaceutical equipments and some shops from eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In a room there is a big barrell (Grosse Fass). This was built in 1751. It has a capacity of 220,017 litres. On the top of it there is a small dance floor.

    In the summer, during the Heidelberg Castle Festival, the castle courtyard is the site of operas, theatre performances and classical concerts.

    The courtyard. The big barrel.
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    See Schloss Heidelberg

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 29, 2014

    The castle can be seen from the main town area. It looks more like a ravaged ruin. For information on it's history I would read Wikipedia, link below:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidelberg_Castle

    I'm not sure I could find the official site for tourist information so here are a couple of links I found:

    http://www.e-heidelberg.com/attractions/

    http://www.heidelberg-marketing.de/content/tourism/sights/heidelberg_castle_castle_gardens/index_eng.html

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    Heidelberg Castle (I) - The Castle

    by King_Golo Updated May 19, 2014

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    Heidelberg's castle towers above the city on a steep hill from where you have the most magnificent views over the old town. The castle was home to Palatine electors for several centuries, but interestingly its exact age is unknown. To me, it didn't look too old, although parts of it have suffered damage in the War of the Palatinate Succession which is especially visible at the tower behind the castle. This was blown up by the French in 1693 following a battle in Heidelberg. Left to the sands of time, the castle quickly fell into disrepair. When elector Karl Theodor wanted to move in what was left of Heidelberg's castle in 1764, the ruin was struck by lightning twice on the same day so he wisely decided against it. In the 19th century, painters rediscovered the castle, and with romanticism getting strong it was soon buzzing with life again. From there it's only a small step to the masses of Japanese and American tourists of today.

    Heidelberg Castle
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    Garden of the Palatinate

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 21, 2014

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    The Hortus Palatinus in Heidelberg Castle was a Baroque garden in the Italian Renaissance style known as the 'Eighth Wonder of the World', and has since been termed 'Germany's greatest Renaissance garden.'
    The garden was commissioned by Frederick V, Elector Palatine in 1614 for his wife and became famous across Europe during the 17th century for the landscaping and horticultural techniques involved in its design.

    You can watch my 4 min 40 sec Video Heidelberg Castle and Garden out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Garden of the Palatinate Garden of the Palatinate Garden of the Palatinate Garden of the Palatinate Garden of the Palatinate
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    Heidelberg Castle

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 21, 2014

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    Heidelberg Castle is the famous and a byword for German Romanticism. The castle has only been partially rebuilt since its demolition in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is located 80 metres up the northern part of the Königstuhl hillside, and thereby dominates the view of the old downtown.
    For five hundred years it was home to the Prince Electors of the Palatinate.

    You can watch my 4 min 40 sec Video Heidelberg part 1 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Opening hours:
    Courtyard 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Big Wine Barrel 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
    Pharmacy Museum 10:00 am - 5:30 pm
    Price:
    Combi-Ticket (Funicular, castle courtyard, big barrel and German Pharmacy Museum): Adults € 6.00, reduced € 4.00

    Guided tours supplement
    Adults € 4.00, reduced € 2.00, Families € 10.00, Groups (of 20 and more) per person € 3.60

    Heidelberg Castle Heidelberg Castle Heidelberg Castle Heidelberg Castle Heidelberg Castle
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    A must do !!!!!

    by jlanza29 Written Nov 12, 2013

    Heidelberg Castle is a famous ruin in Germany and landmark of Heidelberg.

    The castle ruins are among the most important Renaissance structures north of the Alps.
    The castle has only been partially rebuilt since its demolition in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is located 80 metres (260 ft) up the northern part of the Königstuhl hillside, and thereby dominates the view of the old downtown. It is served by an intermediate station on the Heidelberger Bergbahn funicular railway that runs from Heidelberg's Kornmarkt to the summit of the Königstuhl.

    The earliest castle structure was built before AD 1214 and later expanded into 2 castles circa 1294; however, in 1537, a lightning-bolt destroyed the upper castle. The present structures had been expanded by 1650, before damage by later wars and fires. In 1764, another lightning-bolt destroyed some rebuilt sections.

    My favorite part of the castle was seeing the world's biggest wine barrel …. pretty cool !!!!

    We spent about 45 minutes and were able to see everything with no rush !!!!

    Admission price was 6 Euro which include the ride on the funicular from the old town.

    biggest wine barrel in the world !!!!! great views of the old town

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    Guided tour (5): ceilings inside Friedrichsbau

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    Once inside Friedrichsbau, the tour leads to the first floor. The ground floor is occupied by the castle’s chapel, which can be visited at the end of the tour. The hallway in the first floor is beautifully renovated with oak inlay doors in Renaissance style and even more beautiful lockers (see next review).

    The ceiling in the first floor is of beautiful wooden waffle grid style (photo 4). The one in the second floor it is a vault stucco ceiling with several coat of arms of Palatinate (photos 1 and 2).

    The third photo shows again a vault stucco ceiling, but this one is in one of the adjacent rooms in the second floor, the so-called Green Room.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    My photos are from 2006 when photography was still allowed during the guided tour inside of the castle. This is no longer the case since approx. 2010. In September 2013 I asked castle administration what to do with my photos and they kindly granted permission that I keep them in my three reviews because I didn’t take photos of the paintings. These are loan collections hence private and fall under copyright of the owners.
    Thank you, castle administration!

    Ceiling - 2nd floor of Friedrichsbau Ceiling - 2nd floor of Friedrichsbau Ceiling - Green Room of Friedrichsbau Ceiling - 1st floor of Friedrichsbau
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    Guided tour (6): rooms inside Friedrichsbau

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    The adjoining rooms in the first and second floor of Friedrichsbau have also been renovated early 20th century and equipped with furniture of the respective periods, kindly donated by various people.

    These rooms are called White and Green Room and Fireplace Room.

    The ceiling of the Green Room I already showed in the previous review. In addition this room also contains two beautifully and richly manufactured tiled stoves (photos 3 – 5). They were fired from the alley, through special doors.

    The White Room (photo 1) is equipped with Neo-Renaissance furniture in the style of a dining room.

    The Fireplace Room finally, with furniture of Historism style, was meant for relaxing.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    My photos are from 2006 when photography was still allowed during the guided tour inside of the castle. This is no longer the case since approx. 2010. In September 2013 I asked castle administration what to do with my photos and they kindly granted permission that I keep them in my three reviews because I didn’t take photos of the paintings. These are loan collections hence private and fall under copyright of the owners.
    Thank you, castle administration!

    The White Room - in Friedrichsbau The Fireplace Room - in Friedrichsbau Tiled stove - Green Room of Friedrichsbau Tiled stove - Green Room of Friedrichsbau Tiled stove - Green Room of Friedrichsbau
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    Guided tour (7): doors inside Friedrichsbau

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    During the guided tour through Friedrichsbau make sure you have a closer look at the marvellous doors. Many of them have oak inlays and exquisite wrought iron door lockers.

    Photo 1: one of the oak doors with inlays,

    Photos 2 and 3: some of the coloured wrought-iron door lockers with local scenes and images of gods,

    Photo 3: another oak armoire with inlays.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    My photos are from 2006 when photography was still allowed during the guided tour inside of the castle. This is no longer the case since approx. 2010. In September 2013 I asked castle administration what to do with my photos and they kindly granted permission that I keep them in my three reviews because I didn’t take photos of the paintings. These are loan collections hence private and fall under copyright of the owners.
    Thank you, castle administration!

    Friedrichsbau - oak door with inlays Friedrichsbau - wrought iron lockers Friedrichsbau - wrought iron lockers Oak amoire - in Friedrichsbau
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    Father Rhine - relaxes on water :-)

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    Visitors who are walking around in the gardens should spend some extra time there. There are enough large and small grottoes under the upper terrace, statues and fountains everywhere and many other hidden beauties.
    My all-time favourite in the gardens is this very prominent statue of Father Rhine. It symbolises Germany’s most important river. Father Rhein nicely relaxes on top of a water fountain. Behind him, to the right side in the photo is the entrance to another grotto. But this one is smaller than the ones on the upper terrace.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    Father Rhine - the scuplture, relaxing in water
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    The Castle Garden - Hortus Palatinus

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    Between 1616-1619, Prince Elector Friedrich V, who was married to Elisabeth Stuart, commissioned the beautiful castle garden, or Hortus Palatinus (Palatinate garden) built southeast of the castle ground.

    The garden has been built on three levels: the small lower terrace, the main terrace (which is the one, visitors will arrive at when leaving the castle via the main entrance), and the upper garden with large artificial grottos.

    Although it was never finished as planned, it still is a beautiful French style Baroque garden. At one point in history time it was even considered to be the 8th world wonder.

    The garden was filled with herbs and vegetables, as well as beautiful trees, among them some very rare ones. Most of them survived until now and make the garden a beautiful place to walk around. The views of the castle and the city are also splendid from here. Benches invite for a rest.

    Don’t miss to walk up to the upper terrace and enter the big grottos: they have been beautifully styled inside, with little fountains.

    The website of Heidelberg’s castle below is in German only, but it gives you a nice view of how the garden should have been laid according to the original plans.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    View of the castle - from the castle garden Tower Gate of Heidelberg Castle Tower Gate of Heidelberg Castle Beautiful Jacaranca tree, in bloom (in HD garden)
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    The Blown Tower

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    The Blown Tower, or Krautturm, as it was once called because cabbage was stored here, was built in 15th century as the bastion to the south-eastern side of the castle ground. The walls are 6 m thick, and, in addition of being storage for cabbage, it used to be the storage for the regent’s gunpowder. And that is the reason why it was so badly destroyed during the War of the Palatinate Succession end of 17th century. The exploding gunpowder simply blew off part of the wall, which then slid into the moat and was left there.

    Many years ago the Blown Tower looked quite romantic, with moss and ivy growing on the walls. But these have been removed because they enhance the destruction of the rock.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    Exploded Tower and the blown-off wall Exploded Tower and the wall Exploded Tower and the wall
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    The Bell Tower

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    From the terrace visitors can see the remains of the Bell Tower. Once it must have been a beautiful building, given the castle model in Ruprechtsbau. It was somehow the slender counterpart to the Thick Tower in the northwest.

    Bell Tower was originally built early 15th century, remodelled over the years. It served as residential quarters. As the name implies it was equipped with a big bell in the castle heydays.

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    HD Castle - the Bell Tower (north side) HD Castle - the Bell Tower (north side) HD Castle - the Bell Tower (north side) HD Castle - the Bell Tower (north side)
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    One of the most special views of Heidelberg

    by Trekki Updated Sep 26, 2013

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    Standing on the terrace, visitors will have one of the most spectacular views of Heidelberg. From here you can see all the roofs of Heidelberg’s old town, the maze of the little cobbled streets, the churches, Neckar River with the Old Bridge and its famous gate and the view out to the west, direction Rhein River and Palatinate lowlands. In case of excellent weather, you can even see the hills of Palatinate Forest, Pfälzerwald, in the distance.

    On photo 1, the church to the right is Heiliggeist Kirche (Church of the Holy Spirit), the one to the left is Jesuitenkirche. The building to its right side, with the dark roof and the bell tower, is the Old University.

    On photo 3 you can see the Old Bridge and the gate. In front it is the square Karlsplatz (btw: there is a parking garage below, my preferred option when I come by car). The long building at Karlsplatz (painted light yellow) is the Palais Boisserée, which hosts the Germanistic Seminar of the University today. On the other side of the Neckar, you see the famous Heiligenberg (whith Celtic relicts and the infamous Thing Stätte, which was erected during Nazi Germany as an open air theatre. The little path leading up to this hill is the enchanting Philosophenweg (philosophers’ trail).

    © Ingrid D., 2006; update Sept. 2013: wording only.

    Heidelberg - the special view :-) Heidelberg - the special view :-) Heidelberg - the special view of Heiligenberg
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