Ladenburg Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by christine.j
  • Foundations of basilica marked in pavement
    Foundations of basilica marked in...
    by Kathrin_E
  • Things to Do
    by Kathrin_E

Most Recent Things to Do in Ladenburg

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Ancient Roman Remains: the Basilica

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Foundations of the Roman basilica
    3 more images

    The history of Ladenburg (Lopodunum) begins in the 5th century B.C. with a celtic settlement. The Romans turned it into the largest camp of equestrian military units, which was built and fortified between 75 and 98 A.D. After the castellum was destroyed a civilian settlement developed into a town twice the size of today's old town.

    The church of St Gallus is standing on the foundations of the Roman basilica in the ancient forum. As huge as the church seems, it covers only one third of the ground of the basilica, which must have been enormous.
    In the churchyard of St Gallus, two "archeological windows" have been left open where you can see foundations and walls of the Roman building. The ground plan is shown and explained on a board next to the excavations.

    In the pavement of Kirchenstraße the extension of the Basilica is marked with lines of stones in different colours.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    The Bishop's Chapel of St Sebastian

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chapel of St Sebastian
    3 more images

    The Chapel of St Sebastian belongs to the Bishop's palace. Its origins date back to the 7th or 8th century. The oldest visible parts are the Romanesque walls of the northern transept and the steeple. The gothic vaulted choir and the plain rectangular nave have seen several changes and redecorations in the run of the centuries. After being catholic, then calvinist, and catholic again, the chapel was given to the old catholic parish in 1874 who is still using it.

    The inner walls are covered with frescoes of the 15th to 17th century, depicting saints and apostles. These were rediscovered and restored in the 1970s.
    However, the interior cannot be visited. The chapel is currently closed to visitors because it is in urgent need of repairs.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Catholic Church of St Gallus

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Gallus church, steeple seen from market square
    4 more images

    The catholic church, the old parish church of the town, was first mentioned in 787. Around 1000 a second church was built which uses the remnants of the ancient Roman basilica as foundations.
    The oldest part of the church is the Romanesque crypt underneath the choir. The Roman foundation walls are visible from inside.

    In the 13th century the choir and the northern steeple were built, a bit later the nave. The second steeple was added in the 15th century.
    In 1859 - 1867 the church was renovated and enlarged to the west and the neogothic facade with the main portal was added.

    The church is open in the daytime. Access from Kirchenstraße through the western portal.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    The Jupiter Column

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jupiter column in front of the bishop's palace
    2 more images

    Traces of Ladenburg's history are present underground and sometimes people find strange things when digging in their garden.

    Maybe the most remarkable ancient Roman piece that was found in Ladenburg is the Jupiter Column and Four Gods Stone. The sculpture was made in the 2nd century A.D. and ended up in a well not much later when the germanic Alemannen took power and abandoned the Roman gods. There it survived the centuries in excellent state of conservation. The original is inside the Lobdengau-Museum in the Bishop's palace. A copy has been put up outside the palace.

    A statue of Jupiter the giant rider, ready to throw a thunderbolt, can be admired on top of the column. The piedestal, the Four-Gods-Stone, depicts Juno, Minerva, Mercury and Hercules.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Domhof - The Property of the Cathedral Chapter

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Domhof seen from new town hall terrace
    3 more images

    The Cathedral Chapter of Worms already owned real estate in Ladenburg around 1300. In the following centuries they acquired more ground.
    Originally the whole town belonged to the Bishop of Worms. Since 1395, however, most of the town was in the hands of the Elector of Palatinate (Pfalz). So the town had two rulers and two governments to deal with. The property of Worms is located in the southwestern corner of the old town.

    The triangular Domhof square at the western end of Hauptstraße was property of the cathedral chapter (not the Bishop) of Worms. The buildings have been substituted by the only modern architectural sin in the old town, the new town hall and parking garage.
    Hint: public toilets, not very clean but at least free, can be found downstairs at the southern side of the parking garage.

    The sculptures in the square represent the permanent conflict between the two rulers, Elector and Bishop. What their discussion is about is left to your own interpretation. Mine can be found in the travelogue.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    The Bishop's Palace

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bishop's palace
    4 more images

    The palace of the Bishops of Worms has a medieval core. In times of the renaissance it was enlarged to its present size and shape, except some changes in the mid-18th century when the building was turned into offices for the Palatinate administration and the half-timbered upper floor of the northern wing taken down.

    The painted architecture of the facades is a reconstruction. In 1960 remains of the original paintings were found underneath younger plaster and paint and the renaissance decoration repainted according to the finds.

    Excavations next to the palace have unearthed the foundations of the first medieval fortification of the town.

    The palace contains the Lobdengaumuseum, a museum which presents the history of the town and the ancient Roman history of the region. Unfortunately it was already closed when I arrived, but this is one entry on my 'things to see next time' list.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    The Premises of the Bishop

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View from the new town hall towards the chapel
    4 more images

    The Bishop of Worms ruled Ladenburg since the 7th century. In 1395 a large part of the town became property of the Pfalz (Palatinate). So the town had two rulers and two governments to deal with until the Bishops left Ladenburg in 1705.

    The property of the Bishop is located in the southwestern corner of the old town along the town wall. Together with the adjacent Domhof, the property of the cathedral chapter, it forms kind of an enclave inside the town.

    The Bishofshof includes the palace of the Bishop and the Chapel of St Sebastian (see separate tips). A wall surrounds the grounds, which have been turned into a little park with colourful flower beds.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Former Hospital and Chapel of St Antonius

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Former hospital chapel
    2 more images

    The hospital was founded by the citizens of the town probably around 1300. Hospital and chapel were dedicated to St Antonius Eremita (not to mix up with Antonius of Padua, the companion of St Francis).
    The chapel was destroyed both in the 30 Years War and in 1689 and in both cases rebuilt afterwards. Not much is known about the first, medieval building. The present building dates from 1739.
    In the early 19th century the hospital moved away. In 1810 the buildings were sold for profane use and have served as a normal house since then. The octogonal choir of the chapel has received smaller windos in two storeys but the shape still indicates that this was a church.

    The former chapel still has a statue of Saint Antonius standing in a niche of the facade. Antonius was the patron saint not only of the hospital but of the whole town.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Altes Kloster - Old Nunnery

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 19, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Altes Kloster
    2 more images

    The convent that used to be here is long gone and the house is not as old as it looks. In the inscription on the facade it tells us: "Hans Chowanetz, carpenter and cook, has built me on the remains of the old nunnery in the year 1972." So this house is a reconstruction, probably the timberwork has been taken down, repaired and rebuilt just like it is happening right now in the Jesuitenhof.

    A medieval relief of the Madonna and an inscription in gothic letters, both hardly recognizable due to weathering, are attached to the facade above big portal.

    Unfortunately the soap and honey shop inside was closed when I visited, so I cannot tell you much about it - check out the tip on christine.j's Ladenburg page for details.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Sackpfeife

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sackpfeife
    2 more images

    The house named "Sackpfeife" ("bagpipe") is dated 1598 above the entrance door. The wooden balconies in two storeys are preserved, as are the original windows with their little round glass panes. Maybe the most romantic house in town...

    The house is the seat of the restaurant "Sackpfeife". I have not been in (I was alone) but this looks like the perfect place for a romantic candlelight dinner for two...

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Architecture
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Handschuhsheimer Hof

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Handschuhsheimer Hof
    4 more images

    The impressive part stone, part half-timbered building belonged to the noble family of Handschuhsheim (Handschuhsheim is now a suburb of Heidelberg). Such a name (Handschuh = glove) requires a 'speaking' family crest which shows, of course, the glove.

    The house dates from the late 15th century and was enlarged and redecorated in renaissance style a century later. The year 1561 is written above the portal.
    Ground floor and first floor received a design with diamond-shaped stones which were popular in those times and often used on palaces and other reresentative buildings. However, these here are not real but a painted imitation.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Evangelische Kirche - Protestant Church

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Protestant church
    4 more images

    The protestant church is a building in purest neogothic style, erected in 1876-1878. The interior must have recently been renovated. The timberwork of the open roof truss, the galleries, benches, and the repainted ornaments on the walls all match.

    Unfortunately the altar, pulpit, baptismal font and organ have been substituted by modern pieces in the second half of the 20th century. These disturb the overall picture. Shame the neogothic furniture is lost. I could accept the new, slender baptismal font and maybe also the altar, but the pulpit is just plain ugly and the mouldy green modern organ is the worst punch in the eye...

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Altes Rathaus - Old Town Hall

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Altes Rathaus
    1 more image

    Ladenburg's medieval town hall was destroyed in the 30 Years War. Only in 1730 a substitute, the present building, was erected in the until then "deserted" location.

    After several changes of both the building and its use, in 1983 the Volkshochschule moved in who is still using it today. The baroque appearance has been restored.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Marienbrunnen - Virgin Mary Fountain

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fountain in market square
    2 more images

    The fountain in market square bears the image of the Virgin Mary - the majority in Ladenburg, partly being property of the bishops of Worms, is (was) catholic. You will find images of the Madonna on several facades in town, too.

    The present fountain was renewed in the 1950s and substituted an older one in the same location.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Marktplatz - Market Square

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Marktplatz and fountain
    4 more images

    Marktplatz is the heart of the old town. I think the photos speak for themselves - the architecture around the square is amazing. Pick up your dropped jaw, then walk over the square and see it from all angles. Take photos, then climb up the stairs of the fountain in the middle of the square, take more photos from there (best viewpoint!), then sit down in one of the cafes...

    The southern side is the most remarkable example of medieval town planning - a gap between the two half-timbered houses provides a view to the steeple of St Gallus church. Interesting perspective.

    The best light for photos is early in the morning and in the late afternoon.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Ladenburg

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

107 travelers online now

Comments

Ladenburg Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Ladenburg things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Ladenburg sightseeing.

View all Ladenburg hotels