Fun things to do in Stuttgart

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Stuttgart

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    Staatsgalerie

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    Possibly the most architecturally stunning building in all of Stuttgart, this art gallery is a work of art in itself, and deserves a visit even if you don't intend spending the 4.50 needed to get inside and see the vast exhibits within. Walking from the eponymously named U-bahn station to the entrance within the extensions designed by celebrated British architect James Sterling, you witness plenty of delights before you even begin the tour of the gallery itself.

    Opening hours are 10am to 6pm, every day except Thursdays and Mondays. On Thursdays it is open until 9pm, and on Mondays it follows the German tradition of closing. On holidays the information provided states it is open "normal" hours, which doesn't make clear if that means it is closed for holiday Mondays or not.

    Staatsgalerie Staatsgalerie Staatsgalerie Staatsgalerie Staatsgalerie

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    Hauptbahnhof

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    Built between 1914 and 1927, and designed by architects Bonats and Scholer, it is very evocative of the period and one of the most impressive station buildings I have seen. On top of the station is a large tower, which you can scale to see impressive views of the city. The tower itself is a great landmark, and navigation point, especially with its unmistakable and unmissable Mercedes star on the roof. This will likely be the very first building you see in Stuttgart, and it doesn't deserve to be overlooked.

    Stuttgart Station View from Stuttgart Station View from Stuttgart Station View from Stuttgart Station

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    University of Music and Performing Arts

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 23, 2008

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    This squat round tower, which to me looks like an unfinished lighthouse, is the home of the University of Music and Performing Arts (Staatliche Hochschule für Musik und darstellende Kunst Stuttgart).

    The building was completed in 1996, and is directly across the street (a very busy six-lane motorway, actually) from the opera house.

    In the ground floor of the tower there is a concert hall with seat for 500 spectators, where frequent concerts are given by students and faculty of the university. The rest of the tower consists of classrooms and practice rooms, as well as the university library and cafeteria.

    To get up to the top of the tower, take the elevator to the eleventh floor and walk up one flight of stairs to the roof.

    Second photo: From the top of the tower at the University of Music and Performing Arts you can look out through various round and square openings at different parts of the city of Stuttgart.

    Third photo: Through one of the round openings you can get some nice views of the back end of the opera house, with one of Stuttgart's seven hills in the background.

    1. Tower of the Music University 2. On the roof of the tower 3. View of the opera house from the tower
    Related to:
    • Music
    • Architecture

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    Hauptbahnhofturm

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    The train station tower is ten stories tall, and topped with the grand star of Mercedes. Not only is it an eye-catching icon of the city, perfect for navigation, but it also serves as a viewing platform to snatch great pictures of the city. If you want to stand under the Mercedes star, you don't even have to pay any money, as the lifts to the top are free. If you have the time you can even stop off at the exhibitions in the different levels, or the restaurant on floor 8. To get to the top you must take one of the two lifts in the tower to floor 9, and then walk up a few more steps to the observation platform.

    The tower is open until 9pm on weekdays, until 2pm on Saturdays (partial opening until 4pm), and on Sundays it is closed.

    View from the Hauptbahnhofturm

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    Hegel-Haus

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    Stuttgart was the birthplace of the great philosopher Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), who also studied at the university in nearby Tubingen, and died in Berlin. Hegel-Haus, on Eberhardstrasse, was his home from birth until the age of 18. Inside the house you can find a museum dedicated to Hegel, charting his life from Stuttgart to Berlin. Entrance is free, and the museum is open from Monday to Friday, 10am until 5:30pm, and on Saturday from 10pm until 4pm. It is closed on Sundays.

    Hegel-Haus, Stuttgart

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    Wilhelmpalais

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    The former residence of the last King of Wurttemberg, Wilhelm II, the Wilhelm Palace was built between 1834 and 1840 by architect Giovanni Salucci. The building now plays host to the city library, with a collection of nearly one million books.

    Wilhelmpalais, Stuttgart

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    Staatliche Hochschule fur Musik

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    The State Music Academy is built as an adjunct to the Staatsgalerie, and was designed by the same British architect, James Sterling. It opened only fairly recently, in the Spring of 1996. Personally this striking tubular tower was one of my favourite piece of architecture in the whole city.

    State Music Academy, Stuttgart

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    Markthalle

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    Just off to the left of Schillerplatz is the old Market Hall (Markthalle), a beautiful art nouveau building designed by Martin Elsaesser and completed in 1914. It is considered to be one of the most beautiful Market Halls in the country, and worth a look on any tour of the city centre. Within its cavernous interior, of around 7000 square meters, it is still a fully functioning marketplace, with produce from all around the region laid out for sale on row after row of stalls.

    The Market Hall is open Monday to Friday from 7am until 6:30pm, and until 4pm on Saturdays.

    Markthalle, Stuttgart

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    Kunstgebaude

    by antistar Updated Nov 2, 2004

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    The Kunstgebaude (House of Art) can be spotted from the Oberer Schlossgarten or the Schlossplatz, and recognised by its distinctive domed roof, topped with a golden deer. The gallery hosts permanent and special exhibitions, with the permanent one being dominated by Hoelzel, but also other works by the likes of Otto Fritz, of Metropolis fame.

    The Kunstgebaude is free to enter, and is open from 11am to 6pm, Tuesdays to Sundays, with a two hour extension on a Wednesday. It is closed Mondays, even on public holidays.

    Kunstgebaude from the Oberer Schlossgarten Kunstgebaude from the Oberer Schlossgarten

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    Calwer Strasse

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    Calwerstrasse is one of the most pleasant streets in Stuttgart, and is lined with historic gabled houses dating from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. It is popular with strollers, and has an excellent cafe culture, with some quality cafes and restaurants sprawling out onto the streets to try and tempt you to sit down and eat. The adjacent covered arcade, of Calwer Passage, was designed in the 19th century style by Kammerer and Belz in 1978, and is home to some of the most exclusive shops in Stuttgart.

    Calwer Strasse, Stuttgart

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    City Coach Tour

    by JimKnopf Updated Jan 30, 2008

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    I have this Inforamtions from a flyer of the Stuttgart marketing GmbH. Hopes that help you to plan your travel.

    Season April - October and November - March
    Day
    April - October: Daily
    Nov. -March: Fri/Sat/Sun/public holiday
    Time 1.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. also fridays at 5 p.m.
    Participants min. 5 persons
    Price
    per person € 18,-
    concessions € 14,50
    children Euro € 9,50
    Meeting Point >>i-Punkt Hotel am Schlossgarten Schillerstrasse 23
    Languages English + German
    Advance Booking Necessary phone +49 (0)711/2228-0

    This tour takes you to the city's most important points of interest. Passing the state Gallery, the Opera House and parliament building to Schlossplatz and Schillerplatz. Walking through the historic centre you learn a lot of interesting details. The tour then continues along roads offering wonderful panoramas up t the TV Tower (admission included) with a splendid view of Stuttgart and its surroundungs.

    Bookable online at least 4 days in advance

    flyer
    Related to:
    • Cruise
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Eberhardstrasse

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    Eberhardstrasse runs around the edge of the south part of town, marking the end of the Alte Stadt. Until the 14th century, this street formed part of the city wall and moat system. Today it is a chic shopping street, that is obviously such a prime location that shops and restaurants some distance from the street boldly advertise themselves as being "Eberhardstrasse", much to the confusion of idiot tourists like me.

    Eberhardstrasse

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    Tagblatt-Turm

    by antistar Updated Oct 14, 2013

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    This piece of modern architecture was the first high rise concrete tower block in Germany. It caused quite a stir when originally built, being at 61 meters as tall as the tower of the old city hall. While it was not well liked in its day, it has come to be regarded as a high ranking work of architecture, and an protected city monument since 1978. Before it gained protected status, it was the main publishing house of the Stuttgart newspaper, the Tagblatt, hence its name. The tower was built in 1928, and designed by the then completely unknown architect Ernst Otto Osswald.

    Tagblatt-Turm, Stuttgart

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    Landesbibliothek

    by antistar Written Nov 2, 2004

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    The rather ugly State Library, right next door to the City Library at Wilhelmpalais, is home to an astonishing two and a half million book volumes. This includes over fourteen thousand bibles, making this collection one of the most important in the world.

    Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart

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    The State Opera in Stuttgart

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 5, 2011

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    The Stuttgart Opera House was built from 1909 to 1912 as part of the Royal Court Theater (Königliches Hoftheater).

    Unlike many of the nearby buildings, the Opera House was not seriously damaged during the Second World War, but it lost some of its character when it was „modernized“ in 1956 and 1970.

    In 1982 the original blueprints and plans were rediscovered, and in 1983/84 the building was fully restored to its original form. There are seats for 1,399 people, slightly more than in the new opera house in Frankfurt.

    Second photo: On the ceiling of the Stuttgart Opera House there is a large circular painting showing various constellations of the northern sky. It is the work of a painter named Julius Mössel (1871-1957).

    Third photo: If you don't mind sitting up in the third balcony ("3. Rang") of the opera house, you can not only save a lot of money -- some seats cost as little as 8 euros -- you can also step outside onto the roof during the intermission to get some fresh air and have some nice views of the park and the rest of the city of Stuttgart.

    Fourth photo: Like most of the older opera houses in this part of the world, the Stuttgart Opera has separate staircases going up to the second and third balconies on the left and right sides of the building. The idea of this was that the elegant spectators at the lower levels should be spared the indignity of having to mingle with the less elegant spectators from the cheaper levels upstairs. The staircases going up to the third balcony (“III. Rang”) are narrow, dimly lit, not carpeted and not decorated. They just serve the purpose of getting the not-so-well-off people up to their cheap seats without letting them go through the more posh areas down below.


    For more photos, please have a look at my travelogue "The Opera House in Stuttgart".

    1. State Opera in Stuttgart 2. Constellations on the ceiling 3. View from the upper balcony 4. Staircase to third balcony
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Theater Travel
    • Music

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