Ulm Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Ulm

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    Ulmer Münster

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 14, 2011

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    Believe it or not, not everyone that travels to Ulm does so to check out their two exemplary breweries. Some crazed tourists go to view the tallest church in the world: The Ulmer Münster! It's not even a cathedral since they never had a bishop's seat but lo and behold, taller than the somewhat more famous but still shorter cathedral in Cologne. In fact, prior to the 20th century, this baby was the fourth tallest man-made structure in the world after the Eiffel Tower, Italy's Mole Antonelliana and the Washington Monument until came along a decade later.

    The foundation of the massive church dates back to 1377 and work on its tallest tower halted at 100m in 1543 due to various economic, religious and political factors. Construction resumed in 1817 with its eventual completion in 1890. Miraculously enough, though most of the old town was destroyed during WWII bombings, the formidable church was scarcely damaged.

    The steeple still rises over all of Germany at 161.5m with views of the Alps on a clear day. Well, you have to shell out €4 and more importantly climb its 768 steps for the privilege. We didn't even give it a thought since the fog was as thick as pea soup. Okay, a slight exaggeration but it was definitely not a clear day and it's unlikely you could see much beyond the city limits. Maybe worth €4 but not the climb. ;)

    the formidable Ulmer M��nster the back end of the Ulmer M��nster entrance to the Ulmer M��nster carved wooden doors this guy had a nice view
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    wood-timbered crooked house

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 14, 2011

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    No great old German town would be complete without some wood-timbered houses and Ulm has quite a few clustered around a small neighborhood called the Fischerviertal and where would a Fisherman's Quarter be located but on the water. Most noted of these timeless structures is the Schiefes Haus which certainly seems like one of the most crooked houses in the world and attracts many tourists and their cameras trying to capture it. A stroll in this area is a must even though assume you will not be doing this alone unless you go out very early morning.

    the crooked house indeed charming wood-timbered houses wood-timbered & willow willowy wood-timbered house Fisherman's Quarter
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    Ulmer Münster interior

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 14, 2011

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    While many people might argue that the Ulmer Münster's interior could never match its overpoweringly large exterior this is just not the case. If anything, it seems even larger from within and secondly it is a perfect blend of spectacle and simplicity. While not overdone like those of the Bavarian Baroque variety, Ulmer Münster takes its power from large strokes like the immense vaulted ceiling flanked by sky-reaching Gothic entrances. Huge intricate stained glass windows add colorful and shed light on the stunning statures that adorn the central pillars. The carved oak pews are particularly impressive and amongst the most famous of the Gothic period. Though miraculously spared by the ravages of bombing, iconoclasts destroyed not only the main altar but also the church's original organ. The replacement was the biggest organ in the world for many years and is most famous as having been played by Mozart in 1763.

    the stunning interior is bigger than life too well-lit statues on main pillars the impressive vaulted ceiling colorful intricate stained glass at one time the biggest organ in the world
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    Rathaus

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 14, 2011

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    Much like most old towns in Germany, Ulm has an impressive Rathaus or Town Hall. Though it dates back to 1320, it was given a major facelift in the 16th century when colorful murals and an astronomical clock were added. Unfortunately, the building suffered major damage from bombing during WWII. It has been masterfully restored and acts as one of the town's main attractions.

    Ulm's
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    Einstein in Ulm

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 19, 2007

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    This inconspicuous monument is supposed to represent the apartment building where the physicist Albert Einstein was born on March 14, 1879.

    The building was quite new at the time, since it was erected in 1871. It was destroyed by bombs during the Second World War, in December 1944.

    Einstein only lived here for a year and a half, after which his family moved to Munich. It is unclear if he ever returned to Ulm after that, but if he did it was only for brief visits.

    In the 1929, on the occasion of Einstein's 50th birthday, the city of Ulm named a street after him. Einstein was somewhat amused by this, and wrote to the mayor: "I have already heard about the street named after me. My comforting thought was that I am not responsible for whatever is going to happen there." When the Nazis came to power they re-named the street because Einstein was Jewish, and after the war in 1945 the city changed it back again.

    For Einstein's 125th birthday the city of Ulm commissioned an Austrian composer named Dirk D'Ase (born 1960) to write an opera called Einstein in Amerika, which was first performed at the Ulm City Theater on March 18, 2004.

    The Adult Education Center (VHS) in Ulm is in a building called the Einstein House.

    Today there is nobody named Einstein in the Ulm telephone book.

    Second photo: In 2005 several temporary tin-can monuments were set up in Ulm to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Einstein's theory of Special Relativity. But the main purpose of these tin cans seems to have been to advertise local solar energy projects, and the connection to Einstein was tenuous at best.

    1. Einstein was born here 2. Sun in cans, 2005
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    Central Library

    by Nemorino Written Feb 19, 2007

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    The new Central Library in Ulm was opened in May 2004. It is on the Marktplatz (Market Square) near the City Hall.

    The facade is made almost entirely of double glass walls, and the roof is in the shape of a pyramid with a height of more than 36 meters. On the fifth floor there is a readers' cafeteria with views of the city roofs and the Ulm Minster.

    The building is cooled in the summer and warmed in the winter by a modern fuel-saving ventilation system.

    Second photo: The Central Library and the Town Hall.

    Third photo: Entrance to the Central Library.

    1. The central library in Ulm 2. The library and the City Hall 3. Entrance to the central library
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    Keppler in Ulm

    by Nemorino Written Feb 19, 2007

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    This plaque on the Ulm City Hall commemorates the astronomer Johannes Keppler (1571-1630), who moved to Ulm in 1626 and lived here for two years.

    During this time he published his "Rudolphine Tables", which formed the basis of practical astronomy for the next hundred years.

    Today there are 13 people named Keppler in the Ulm telephone book.

    Second photo: The City Hall, Marktplatz 1.

    1. Johannes Keppler plaque 2. The City Hall (Rathaus)
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    The Danube River

    by Nemorino Written Feb 19, 2007

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    Here in Ulm is where the Danube (known in German as the Donau) starts to be navigable for river boats. Above Ulm you would have to have a canoe or kayak, but even then you might have to get out and wade in some places where the water is low (at least we did on our canoe trip in 1962).

    There are now several dams along the Danube between Ulm and Regensburg, so it's more a series of lakes than a river.

    The Danube is the boundary between the cities of Ulm, in Baden-Württemberg, and Neu-Ulm, in Bavaria, which means that the school children in Ulm have different vacations than their friends across the bridge in Neu-Ulm.

    Second photo: There is a small ferry boat crossing the Danube from Ulm to Neu-Ulm, in addition to several bridges.

    Third photo: Excursions are offered from May to October on this river boat, the MS Donau.

    Fourth photo: Sign advertising the river boat excursions.

    1. The Danube River 2. The ferry boat 3. The excursion boat MS Donau 4. Sign advertising the excursions

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    Fishermen's and tanners' district

    by Nemorino Written Feb 19, 2007

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    This attractive district is located between the Minster and the river. It has narrow streets and historic half-timbered houses, as well as hotels, restaurants, cafés and galleries.

    Second photo: Fischerplatz, with the Minster steeple visible in the background.

    Third photo: Café by the Crooked House.

    1. Fishermen's and tanners' district 2. Fischerplatz 3. Caf�� by the Crooked House

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    The City Theater

    by Nemorino Written Feb 19, 2007

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    This is another one of those small city theaters in Germany which were collectively awarded the title Opera House of the Year by the critics of Opernwelt magazine for the year 2004.

    Okay, you can't expect to see any big-name opera stars here, and you won't get the really stunning new productions like the ones in Stuttgart or Frankfurt, but they do have their own opera and drama ensembles, and they provide a substantial schedule of operas, musicals, plays and ballets for over ten months of every year.

    The Ulm City Theater was where the famous conductor Herbert von Karajan got his start as a young man, so the square in front of the theater is now named after him.

    Second photo: The current building is a replacement for an older one that was destroyed during the Second World War.

    Third photo: Entrance hall of the Ulm City Theater.

    1. Ulm City Theater 2. Ulm City Theater 3. Entrance hall
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    Cathedral in Downtown Ulm

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 29, 2004

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    If you are a fan of architecture, I highly recommend a stop into Ulm to view this wonderful cathedral. There are tours available, and well worth the hike to the top.

    The Ulm Cathedral is the biggest church in southern Germany with the world's tallest church spire (161m, 768 steps) and the most beautiful Gothic choir stalls in existence.

    Ulm Cathedral, photo by Mark Carroll (c)2001
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    The Butcher and the Farmer

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 23, 2014

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    This statue of two men and three pigs is at the Pig Market, known officially as the Schweinemarkt and unofficially as the Saumarkt.

    The inscription in the local dialect reads:

    Dr Metzgr ond dr Baur
    beim
    Handl om dui Sau
    Which means:

    The butcher and the farmer bargaining about the sow.

    The farmer is not getting a good price, I don't think. When you go to Ulm, have a look at the statue and see if you agree.

    The Butcher and the Farmer

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    Ulm Minster

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 24, 2007

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    This protestant church was built starting in 1377 and is said to have the world's highest church steeple, measuring 161.53 meters from the bottom to the top.

    Thanks to VT member Mariajoy for asking if this was really the world's tallest steeple, and wondering who had done the research. Well, when I was in Ulm I actually just took their word for it, but it turns out that Guinness World Records is one source of this claim. Also Ulm is first on the Wikipedia list of the tallest churches. Lincoln (England) would be second if their spire hadn't collapsed in 1549.

    Actually Ulm's claim to fame may be short-lived, because if the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona is finished on schedule by the year 2026, then it will be the tallest.

    Second photo: The steeple of Ulm Minster.

    1. Ulm Minster 2. The steeple of Ulm Minster
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    Intricate Carvings

    by ATXtraveler Written Feb 10, 2005

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    Matthäus Böblinger is the architect of this wonderful structure, and it is wonderful to see this intricate detail that is carved into the structure.

    It always amazes me to see the detail that older generations took to each of their buildings. It will be interesting to see if that detail comes back in the future.

    outside of Ulm Cathedral

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    Löwenbrunnen

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Dec 4, 2011

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    The Lions Fountain (Löwenbrunnen) was built before the 17th century, it shows a single column supporting a double lion, which has an imperial eagle on the one side and Ulm´s shield on the other.
    Due to damage in the 2nd World War and the re-designing of the Minster Square, its location was changed several times until it was erected at its current site in 1992.
    The original column can now be seen in Ulm Museum.

    L��wenbrunnen Irina at L��wenbrunnen
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Ulm Things to Do

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