Outside Berlin, Berlin

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  • Outside Berlin
    by rogli
  • Outside Berlin
    by rogli
  • Path and stream
    Path and stream
    by rogli
  • Mandy23's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg

    by Mandy23 Updated Jan 20, 2003

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    castle in KW (State of Brandenburg)

    It's the Federal State which surrounds Berlin and the one I live in *g*, offers a variety of sights which are easily accessible for a day trip. Easily to say for me when I already live here, but it's really close ;-)

    The State of Brandenburg covers an area of 29,056km² (11,218 miles²) and stretches between the rivers Elbe and Oder. There are 3000 rivers and lakes in this area - with Havel and the Spree as the main rivers.

    With 500 hectares of parks and 150 palaces constructed between 1730 and 1916, the complex of palaces and parks of Potsdam are worth a visit. Voltaire stayed at Sanssouci Palace, which was built under Frederick II between 1745 and 1757.

    Königs Wusterhausen

    Königs Wusterhausen is located southeast of Berlin in the state of Brandenburg. The surrounding countryside including forests and lakes has been popular among Berliners since the early 20th century.

    If you have some time, you could visit the Königs Wusterhausen Palace which was originally a medieval castle. It was the favourite haunt of Frederick William I, who used it as a hunting lodge and held his famous Tabakskollegium or 'tobacco round' here.

    Königs Wusterhausen is an important transport junction. The A10 and A13 motorways pass close by and the town is also crossed by the B179 linking Berlin to the area. Berlin's Schönefeld airport is only 15km away.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Potsdam - Sanssouci Park

    by keeweechic Updated Nov 20, 2002

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    Sanssouci was the summer palace of Frederik I, and I think was known more for its grounds and the famous terraces of grape vines and rows of bedded plants. Of course it was winter and I was freezing my butt off but I could still imagine how wonderful it would look in the warmer months.

    Opening times:

    1 April - 31 October. 1 November - 31 March. Closed on Mondays

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  • bmiller39's Profile Photo

    Seelowe hoeher or Seelow...

    by bmiller39 Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Seelowe hoeher or Seelow Heights..about 30 miles due East of Berlin on Hwy 1 (a very scenic drive). This is a small town almost on the Polish border that saw a great deal of fighting in WWII. The Germans made their final stand against the Russians reportedly to buy time for the civilians of Berlin to escape..There was extremely fierce fighting and many of the emplacements and positions are still in place..The best restaurant in town is the Schwarzer Adler (Black Eagle ?) and that also does double duty as a hotel. There is a small museum on the way to the polish border (hwy1) that is magnificent in its historical presentation of the battle..they have a regurlarly scheduled video show and if you ask the curator he will provide it in English. Also a lighted map table portraying the troop movements etc...THIS IS WORTHY OF A TRIP !

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  • Werder/Havel

    by sabsi Updated Aug 29, 2002

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    Rowing in and around Werder

    This is a little town outside Potsdam (You can get there by S-Bahn from Berlin). It's situated on an island, there are many apple trees, old houses, cobblestone streets, Fish restaurants and a gorgeous scenery there! Go there for a day to see something else than cars, houses and traffic jams.
    You can see pics of our rowing trips in my travelogue!

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  • Bauhaus, in Dessau, a 100 km...

    by stijn_swinne Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Bauhaus, in Dessau, a 100 km from out of Berlin. Bauhaus is the famous art style and school from

    1919-1930. The art was very shocking with it's very simple and rational designs in it's furniture,

    textile, architecture. It's designs are still called modern at present time. When visiting Bauhaus you

    should always keep in mind that the designs were made in the years 1920-1930. Compare the tables,

    chairs, spoons, architecture with the style you know like at your grandmothers house... You will

    certainly feel that these were really shocking for some people. Bauhaus dissapeared in Dessau with the

    due to the upcoming Nazi success. The school closed in 1933, many intellectuals fled to the United

    States of America (Bauhaus is very known in Chicago, see the flats, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe)

    http://www.bauhaus-dessau.de/en/index.asp

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    The extermination camp of...

    by CubsIn4 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    The extermination camp of Sachsen-Hausen may not be a very cheery destination, but it's an important site historically. It was first used by the Nazis for political prisoners and later by the Soviets for German POWs. It's a very grim and emotional reminder of the harm done to the German people by both the Nazis and the Soviets.

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  • greentara's Profile Photo

    There's a wonderful lake...

    by greentara Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    There's a wonderful lake surrounded by forest at a place called Leignitz. So beautiful on a hot summers day to walk through the cool forest then lie in the sun or play ball then jump in the lake to cool off!

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  • nighthawk's Profile Photo

    Dutch houses in PotsdamIn...

    by nighthawk Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Dutch houses in PotsdamIn 1732, after the Prusian king Friedrich Wilhelm I had visited The Netherlands, he insisted on having Dutch building-contractors to built a quarter in a swampy area of Potsdam. Not only because he had such a faith in their building insights, also because the king thought that some Dutch immigrants were needed in Potsdam. He expected that they would have a favourable influence on the economy. Where else would these colonists rather live than in pure Dutch brick houses with a clock facade, tiffany windows and red brown panels?Only 24 families settled and most of them returned to the Netherlands rather quickly. Despite that fact the 134 houses still stand, although many are empty and rotting away. In 1990 was started with raising funds to restore the quarter.Dutch builders had built before in East Germany. After 1750 they builded palaces for two daughters of the Dutch municipal Frederik Hendrik of Orange and Amalia Solms. Both daughters had married with German princes, something more Dutch royalty would do in the years after.Louise Henriette of Orange and her prince moved into the palace Oranienburg and her sister Henriette Catharina and her spouse lived in Oranienbaum, a palace in a village that had the same name, between Dessau and Wittenberg.Oranienbaum still seems to be perfect and is a pure typical Dutch building, and has a strong resemblance with the palace Noordeinde in The Hague.Oranienburg, somewhat north of Berlin, has been successively since 1700 a cotton factory, a plant for acid, a school, SS-barracks, a Russian barracks and finally the shelter for border police. All that off course is no good for a palace.

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    If you want to stretch your...

    by oja Written Aug 25, 2002

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    If you want to stretch your recent history experience a few years beyond the Cold War, hop on S1 and head for Oranienburg. What you'll find there is a concentration camp of Sachsenhausen - not as well-known as Auschwitz or Dachau, but equally moving. Well worth a few hours.

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  • miaou's Profile Photo

    Of course I couldn't resist...

    by miaou Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Of course I couldn't resist taking a picture of this enchanting Chinese Teahouse. Overall, good easy-going day in Potsdam. Certainly Potsdam is not a priority when visiting Berlin but it's a side excursion if you have time and want to a break from the city. To get to Potsdam, take the S7 train (the S-Bahn) from Berlin's Bahnhof Zoo. It's only half an hour away.

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    Go to POTSDAM (west of Berlin)...

    by miaou Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Go to POTSDAM (west of Berlin) and see how Frederick II spoiled himself. This 600 acre park holds royal residence, pavilions, fountains, etc. This palace is Schloß Sanssouci. Tours of this place are only in German.

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  • deeper_blue's Profile Photo

    Potsdam

    by deeper_blue Written Jul 6, 2008

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    Potsdam is an ideal daytrip from Berlin, easily accessable by train you can see the beautiful Sansoucci palace, Cecilinhof castle (where the allies divided up the defeated Germany in 1945).

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Trellised Pavilion

    by keeweechic Updated May 25, 2003

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    The Trellised Pavilion within the grounds - I had six layers on and I was still freezing my butt off.
    .

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  • RamSter's Profile Photo

    The Spree Forest near and...

    by RamSter Written Sep 12, 2002

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    The Spree Forest near and around Berlin, truely beautiful place, not far from the city, very peaceful indeed.

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