Treptower Park, Berlin

21 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • River Spree (And Boats For Hire)
    River Spree (And Boats For Hire)
    by johngayton
  • Lone Jogger
    Lone Jogger
    by johngayton
  • Anyone For Tennis? (Table That Is)
    Anyone For Tennis? (Table That Is)
    by johngayton
  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    Soviet Memorial

    by diocletianvs Updated Sep 17, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Soviet Memorial
    2 more images

    Causalties of the Soviet Army in the WWII battle for Berlin were huge, and so is this monument commemorating them that occupies the central area of the Treptower Park. Some 5,000 Soviet soldier are buried here.

    The monument is a typical Soviet - Stalinist piece of gigantism and features statue of the Motherland (represented as a grieving woman) and statues of Soviet soldiers flanked by huge triangles (made of red granite Nazis bought from Sweden for their never finished projects in Berlin). From this point there is a broad view of the main monument of the Soviet Soldier saving a child and fighting a Swastika, placed on top of a huge hill. The paths leading there are decorated by some reliefs showing the scenes from the war and many Stalin's words displayed in Russian on the one side and in German on the other side.

    The monument is not as crowded as it used to be in the GDR time when it was the must-stop of organized bus tours but it is kept in almost perfect shape and is worth visiting if for nothing else then for its size and monumentality. I stopped here for a while and tried to think about the Soviet army losing so many soldiers here and it made understanding the irrational post-war German and especially Berlin history a little bit easier.

    Was this review helpful?

  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    Treptower Park

    by diocletianvs Updated Sep 17, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Treptower Park

    The heart of Berlin is made of the huge Tiergarten, but its residential districts are rather dense. Treptower Park makes a green oasis situated on the river Spree in south-eastern suburbs of Berlin and is very popular among those looking for some nature and escape from the urban environment.

    This large park was created in the 19th Century and features huge meadows, natural wooden areas and some restaurants and cafes situated close to the water. There are some boats to rent here as well, and nearby Spreepark is a nostalgic amusement park built during the GDR era. But the main feature of the Treptower park is huge Soviet Memorial commemorating some 300,000 causalties on the Soviet side during the battle for Berlin in WWII.

    S-bahn station Treptower Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • diocletianvs's Profile Photo

    Treptower (business) Park

    by diocletianvs Updated Sep 19, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Treptow riverside development
    1 more image

    This area on the banks of the river Spree close to Treptower park is perhaps new Docklands of Berlin. New offices and residential buildings occupy an area of former industry and although it may not be the liveliest area of Berlin for me it was a pure pleasure to wander around.

    Port cranes and new skyscrapers - wow, what else could I ask for ?

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (1) - Introduction

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 19, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Soviet War Memorial covers a huge space.

    We went to Treptower Park because I wanted to see the kitschy-bombastic monument of the Soviet soldier with the child, the symbol of the liberation from fascism and the Nazis by the Soviet army, and the glorious start of the not so glorious GDR state.

    This Soviet Memorial is the centre-piece of the huge 10 hectare park which is bordered by the river Spree. But the park is really much more. It is a great place of relaxation, has a lot of space for lying down in the grass, have a picnic, and for ball games. You can walk for several kilometres on the promenade along the river, hire a rowing or pedal boat. There are also kiosks along the river where you get a Berliner Weiße mit Schuss.

    Be prepared to walk quite a bit from the S-Bahn station Treptower Park. BTW Next to the S-Bahn station you find boats for tours, and the kiosks. If you turn to the left you get to the Molecule Man and the Treptowers, a big swimming pool on the river, and a real bit further down – we took the bus LOL – you reach Oberbaumbrücke and Eastside Gallery.

    If you do not walk along the river but cross busy Alt-Treptow street you cross a huge lawn, used for suntanning and playing, and to a big lake which the Berliners call “Karpfenteich” (Carp Pond). From there it is not far to the Soviet Memorial (Sowjetisches Ehrenmal).

    Another attraction of the park is Archenhold-Sternwarte (Observatory). They have the world’s longest lens telescope.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee und Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (7) - The 16 Marble Sarcophagi

    by Kakapo2 Updated Mar 25, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A look at the heroic Soviet army.
    2 more images

    The 16 white marble sarcophagi – eight on each side – along the boundaries of the Soviet War Memorial complex in Treptower Park impressed me most.

    As said earlier, some of the stories on those sarcophagi are ridiculous if you know how history went on. But at the time they were created they were the perfect description of war and peace, of grief and hope, and above all, they still reflect the feelings of the ordinary people who lost their homes and many loved ones.

    I think they are impressive pieces of this kind of bombastic monumental art. Walking along the sarcophagi you can read the history of the war even if you do not understand neither Russian nor German. The reliefs tell the war history of the Soviet peoples.

    The quotations of Stalin – in Russian on the inside towards the central Grove of Honour, in German towards the boundary – have caused political controversy, and I also wonder if the quotations of such a tyrant and murderer should be left at such a spot, even if it is testimony of an historic era. Stalin was no better than Hitler, and I imagine which protest it would cause if comments of Hitler’s Mein Kampf had been incorporated in a war memorial. I think this Stalin memory is politically too correct.

    Each of the 16 sarcophagi has its own theme, for example: Germany’s attack, destruction and suffering in the Soviet Union, sacrifice of the Soviet people, support for the army, heroic army, heroic battle, sacrifice and agony of the army, victory and heroic death.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (2) - Soviet War Memorial

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 19, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    There are several Soviet War Memorials in Berlin, the most visited surely the OTHER one on Straße des 17. Juni, as it is located along the boulevard which links Brandenburger Tor and Siegessäule, and the people just walk past. It requires a little effort to get to THIS memorial, as there are no other famous attractions around it, and you have to walk quite a bit from the S-Bahn station.

    The memorial in the centre of Treptower Park is the biggest one of its kind in Germany, and although rather kitschy it did not deter me at all. Its magnitude took me by surprise, and the workmanship impressed me. Sure, if you know how history went on after World War II and how the theory of real socialism in the eastern part of Germany and Europe ended, you cannot take the message seriously. But separated from its content and the execution of the work, it is well worth a visit.

    The memorial is not just a memorial. It is a memorial park within Treptower Park. It was created from 1946 to 1949 at the site of a former huge playground, and is a cemetery for more than 5000 Soviet soldiers as well as a monument for the victory over the Nazis and fascism. They needed 40,000 cubic metres of granite to build the monument. Every year on 8 May, the day of the liberation, a memorial service takes place. But the state does not hold ceremonies there anymore. The last official military act was on 31 August 1994 when the Russian troops retreated from GDR.

    In times of separation the monument was the symbol of GDR’s founding myth: East-Germany freed from the claws of suppression, incorporating the everlasting appeal to follow in the footsteps of the heroes who had successfully fought for socialism and freedom.

    A collective of architects and artists collaborated to achieve the impressive result. The architect Jakov S. Belopolski, the sculptor Yevgeni Wutshetitch, the painter Alexander A. Gorpenko and the engineer Sarra S. Valerius were the heads of the project.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (4) - Mutter Russland (Mother Russia)

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The centrepiece of the forecourt.

    Following the alley from the Triumphal Arches on Puschinallee or the street Am Treptower Park you reach a kind of forecourt.

    Its centre-piece is a three metre high statue of a woman. She symbolises Mother Russia, the homeland grieving for its fallen sons.

    From here the view opens to the main part of the memorial park.

    Passing two red granite monuments you enter the Grove of Honour.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (5) - Red Granite Flags

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stylised flag, symbolising grief.
    1 more image

    A wide alley, bordered by willows, leads from the forecourt to the main field of the complex (see photo of the tip "Soviet War Memorial") in Treptower Park.

    You enter this main field passing between two monuments made of red granite. They are stylised flags, hanging towards the alley, symbolising grief – like a person bending the head when in grief.

    On the front sides of each flag you see the sculpture of a soldier on his knees, each carrying a machine gun. One of the soldiers is a young guy, the other one looks clearly older. (See detail on photo 2.)

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (6) - The Grove of Honour (Ehrenhain)

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grove of Honour, view towards the monument.
    1 more image

    The Grove of Honour (Ehrenhain) within the Soviet War Memorial in Treptower Park is a huge grassy field in the centre of the whole complex, about 200 or 300 metres long, leading up to the bombastic statue of the soldier with the child. Five iron-cast reiths are placed in this area.

    Here, 4800 Soviet soldiers are honoured. But most probably they are not buried under the five burial grounds which are framed by low hedges and each adorned by a flagstone and a big iron-cast laurel reith. The fields are more symbolic. The real burial sites are more probably beside this grove which is bordered by white gravel walkways on both sides of the complex, under the sycamore trees. Another 200 soldiers are buried in the hill of the mausoleum.

    On photo 2 you have a perfect view over the five symbolic burial sites, as from the elevated position of the mausoleum.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (3) - Triumphbogen (Triumphal Arch)

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The arch at the side of Puschkinallee.

    If you come from Puschkinallee you enter the Soviet War Memorial in Treptower Park through a trimphal arch, made of grey granite. An inscription honours the soldiers who “died for freedom and independence of the socialist homeland”.

    A second entrance portal is on the other side, on the street Am Treptower Park.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (9) - The Mausoleum

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A five-pointed stars adorns the dome.
    2 more images

    The mausoleum in Treptower Park is located in a pavillion at the end of the Grove of Honour. This pavillion is sitting on a burial hill, and on the mausoleum stands the statue of the soldier with the child. You can walk up there on a wide staircase.

    You can have a look inside through the iron bars that protect the wonderful dome of the mausoleum and in its centre the book of honour which holds the names of the soldiers who are buried here.

    The dome is covered in great mosaics. At the bottom you see representatives of all Soviet republics mourning their deaths, the top is adorned by the five-pointed star of communism. In between are mosaic ribbons with inscriptions in Russian and German. The German translation obviously contains some mistakes - but as I can only read the Cyrillic letters but do not understand their meaning I cannot judge this.

    BTW Such hills on which the pavillion was erected are called “Kurgan”. They are the medieval burial sites of the wide plains of the river Don.

    Photo 2 and 3 show the entire mausoleum and the statue of the soldier with the child.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    (8) - The Soldier and the Child

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saving the child, destroying the swastika.

    And finally we are at the main monument of the War Memorial park, the huge statue of the Soviet soldier towering on the mausoleum. The soldier holds a German child on his left arm. In his right hand he holds a sword with lowered blade, and under that you can recognise pieces of the destroyed swastika.

    The child symbolises the innocent (German) people who can look towards a brighter future in the arms of their saviours.

    The sculpture is 12 metres high and weighs 70 tonnes. It stands on a mausoleum, and this on its part is erected on an 18 metre high burial hill. You can walk up a wide staircase to the mausoleum.

    The statue had to be restored in October 2003. For this purpose it was taken to a workshop on the island of Rügen, and came back to Berlin by ship. Since 4 May 2004 it is back on its base on the mausoleum.

    Location:
    Between the streets Puschkinallee and Am Treptower Park, 12435 Berlin-Treptow

    Directions:
    S-Bahn S41, S42, S8, S85, S9, station Treptower Park
    Buses 166, 265, 365, stations Sowjetisches Ehrenmal and Herkomer Straße, also N 65 Klingerstraße and Rethelstraße

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sarahandgareth's Profile Photo

    Sombre wartime memorial

    by sarahandgareth Updated Jun 4, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Treptower Park Soviet Memorial

    Soviet War Memorial, Treptower Park

    Although some people do make the trek over to Treptower Park, many people still seem to confuse this memorial with the far less impressive one in the Tiergarten.

    The war memorial is a massive exercise in Soviet visual propaganda, and is also a grave for 5,000 Soviet soldiers who helped to liberate Berlin (as a consequence, it's also a solemn place; keep the raucous picnics for other parts of the very large park, closer to the river).

    At one end stands a statue representing Mother Russia, at the other a heroic Soviet soldier carrying a child, and trampling on a swastika. Even if you're turned off by the many quotes from Stalin that adorn the friezes on either side of the memorial, in Russian and German, this memorial is a very powerful reminder of the tragedy, suffering and heroism of very ordinary people, in this case young Soviet soldiers, that have so marked Berlin.

    Perhaps understandably, the memorial seems at its most impressive in the dead of winter, the trees bare and a sprinkling of snow on the ground. Once, while we were visiting, a fox darted out from one side of the park, leaving tracks in the snow and disappearing through the railings at the other side.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    The Soviet War Memorial in Treptower Park

    by azz8206 Written Oct 2, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Soviet soldier on top of the mausoleum
    4 more images

    The Soviet War Memorial in Treptower Park is a must see for anyone going to visit Berlin. It is a massive and beautiful open space that is pure genius. Hats off to the Soviet propaganda machine that is alive and well and living in Treptower Park. The Memorial is 900 metres from the entrance to the park. You will see an arch and a fountain across the road. Go through the arch. You will get to a statue of the Motherland weeping at the loss of her sons, look to the left. You will be greeted by two towering granite Soviet flags flanked by two statues of kneeling soldiers with their helmets in their hands and their heads hung down. Passing through the granite flags is a stairway that you must manoeuvre down. In the middle of the monument is a well maintained lawn with well trimmed bushes all around and lined by 16 stone sarcophagi with carvings of military scenes. There are quotations on both sides of the sarcophagi one side in Russian and the other in German. At the end and on top of the mausoleum, is a towering statue of a Soviet soldier holding a German child in one arm while another has his/her arms around his neck. His sword is drawn and pointed towards the ground. Underfoot there is a broken Nazi swastika that he has trampled on. All the stone was taken from Hitler's Reich Chancellery. There are 5000 Soviet soldiers buried here. This memorial is really and I mean REALLY amazing. There aren't many people here like in other touristy locations which is great because this memorial is meant to be admired in quiet awe. I will certainly never forget coming here.
    Another thing I'd like to point out. The park is only a half hour walk from the East Side Gallery down Muhlenstrasse so it would be wise to do both on the same day. At the end of Muhlenstrasse go right and over a bridge and the park is right there. Or you can take the S-Bahn to Ostkreuz then transfer lines here to Treptower Park. Entrance is free.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    no expectations

    by richiecdisc Updated Mar 24, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    gloomy Sunday

    We drove in from Dresden so the first thing I saw was this bizarre bridge in a park. It was gorgeous out but we had left later than we had planned. I would have normally asked to stop for a photo but I knew Doreen was tired and figured we could come back. It turned out to be Treptower Park and not exactly all that close to the city. After exploring town, I asked to go back out there our last day in town. It took a while to get there by mass transit and it was a gloomy day. It was a dirty rundown park but certainly a place for locals. The bridge itself was disappointing and showed me once again how bit a part expectations play in liking something. I hadn't expected anything when I first saw it, and it seemed amazing. After waiting a few days to get back there, it was really nothing special. Still, it offers a weird glimpse into a part of the city I imagine the tourist board would rather you not visit. lol

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Berlin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

71 travelers online now

Comments

View all Berlin hotels